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First Bear Post

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Hi, all! I'm brand new to this forum, as well as a relatively new skier. This is my third season and I've progressed reasonably well (I consider myself a pretty solid intermediate). I just purchased my ski instructor's Blizzard SXPs (170's) and decided to upgrade my boots as well. I got a great deal on a pair of Dalbello Proton 8's (Mondo 285) at the local sports/ski store (the only place in town that sells ski equipment). I'm pushing a size 11 in street shoes, but my left heel is already lifting significantly in these boots after a fairly brief night at the local ski resort (Peek 'n Peak, Clymer, NY). The fitter at the store is willing to work with me to either tighten the boots up or exchange them for a smaller size, so I guess my questions are as follows: (1) Am I in the right type boot for my level? (2) Am I in the right boot for my shoe size? I'm sure you've heard this all before, but any advice will be greatly appreciated.

Pete in Erie, PA
post #2 of 21
pjnats, welcome to EpicSki. While waiting for one of the boot pros to look into your question, could you pull the liner out of that boot and describe the fit you get from the shell?
post #3 of 21
pjnats,

Welcome to Epic Ski!

After checking shell sizing and making sure the size is correct, have the bootfitter check you range of motion at your ankle. Make sure he assesses your dorsilflexion. If there is a lack, your boot may need adjustments. Also, have you had a ski lesson to analyze your technique?
post #4 of 21
Thread Starter 
First of all, thanks for the quick reply. I have removed the liner and "finger" tested the boot length. I have about a finger and a half with my toes touching the front. I do have narrow feet (B width) and I'm wondering if these boots aren't simply too wide. Regarding my technique, I have had a couple of years of lessons, and am obviously still attempting to improve. My instructor is attempting to get me into a more "dynamic" stance and encouraged the upgrade in equipment. When he saw me wearing my new boots, he simply said: "Your boots are too big, aren't they?" A wise man. Anyway, I'm supposed to try on a 27.5 version of the same boot tonight, but again, if these boots are notable for their width, then maybe I'm "barking" up the wrong tree!

Pete
post #5 of 21
try the 27 in the same and shell fit that FIRST.

then if that is really too small, try a 28 in a narrower boot and see.
post #6 of 21
Thread Starter 

Feelin' better

Okay, yesterday I took my 28.5 Dalbello Proton 8's back to the store and exchanged them for 27.5's. Immediate improvement. Without any tweaking my feet were secure in the boot. I skied for two hours just to see how they would feel. They were great during my runs, but I did have to take them off in the lodge to give my feet a break. I'm confident that with continued use they will pack out enough that they will be comfortable both on and off the hill. One nice feature with this year's model is that they provide heel cups for narrower feet or to tighten rearfoot fit. Thanks again for the input; I'll let you know what happens during the remainder of the season.

Pete in Erie, PA
post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 

A quick update

A friend and I spent part of the day at Holiday Valley in Ellicottville, NY yesterday. A beautiful, sunny day with soft, spring snow. On the down side, my boots continue to pack out more than I anticipated. I've only worn them three times, and the left boot, which is on my shorter foot, is becomming noticeably loose. I had hoped not to have to install the heel inserts that come with the boots at this point, for fear that they will somehow make the boots pack out even more. At what point do liners in general stop packing out? I have about 10 total hours of skiing in these boots, and I'm amazed how much they've changed already. Thanks again for your help.

Pete in Erie, PA
post #8 of 21
Quote:
I had hoped not to have to install the heel inserts that come with the boots at this point, for fear that they will somehow make the boots pack out even more.
Install the heel inserts and see if the boots contain your rear foot better. They will not make the liners pack out faster.

Quote:
At what point do liners in general stop packing out? I have about 10 total hours of skiing in these boots, and I'm amazed how much they've changed already. Thanks again for your help.
Liners break in approximately after 10 days of skiing. (a very loose approximation) If you are dealing with loosening, why not try a slightly thicker sock? If you have one foot that is looser, use a slightly thicker sock on that foot. Also, bootfitters can help you. (I think they still do that, don't they?)

The real answer to "When do these liners stop packing out?" is the moment you start skiing on another boot!
post #9 of 21
Production boot liners never stop breaking down. They start packing out the first day you ski and stop when you buy your next new boot.

The Proton 8 is 101mm at the forefoot and has generous volume over the top of the instep.

To find the correct boot for your foot takes more than just shell sizing. Ok, It sounds like you found the correct length boot for your foot through trial and error. Finding the best width and volume for your foot is the key to having a new boot last the longest without needing to shore up the fit.
If you are in the first 10 hours of the boots life and looking for fit aids to take down the volume, I think that maybe this boot is too voluminous for your foot. The boot needs to feel like a firm handshake around your foot in the shop to last the test of time on the hill.

Buying a boot that is too puffy to start is a little like being addicted to crack. Sure it seems OK to put those little heel tighteners in for a quick fix, but then the next thing you know your back in the local ski shop begging for another set, then it's onto the harder stuff like a bontex insole, or a neoprene tongue shim. A week later you find yourself late at night trying to track down a "bootfitter" in the alley for a bootlegged pair of eliminator tongues. It all ends badly when you get caught stuffing your kids hamster, and your wifes panties into your boots and trying to justify it by telling your instructor that you just needed a little bit more to make everything alright.
post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by starthaus View Post
Buying a boot that is too puffy to start is a little like being addicted to crack. Sure it seems OK to put those little heel tighteners in for a quick fix, but then the next thing you know your back in the local ski shop begging for another set, then it's onto the harder stuff like a bontex insole, or a neoprene tongue shim. A week later you find yourself late at night trying to track down a "bootfitter" in the alley for a bootlegged pair of eliminator tongues. It all ends badly when you get caught stuffing your kids hamster, and your wifes panties into your boots and trying to justify it by telling your instructor that you just needed a little bit more to make everything alright.
Jim, this is classic!

pete, sounds like you should exchange the boots if you still can.
post #11 of 21
Jim, would those be "whitey tighties" or thongs because I find the thongs leave marks in my shins!

pjnats,

Starthaus offers great advice as usual, if you are a B width there are better lasted boots for you out there. The Dalbello Krypton series is meant for a narrower foot if you prefer Dalbello but there are a variety of other brands that would better match your foot shape. Probably a softer race boot with a 95 to 97 mm forefoot would be a good place to start!

The skis you purchased will do fine for you but if you are serious about skiing and getting better, get the boots right, right away and enjoy the ride!!

Panties......can you believe that...really?
post #12 of 21
Thread Starter 

Wow!

It looks like I hit the motherload of advice! Thank you, everyone, for the wealth of information! Just for a point of reference, when I tried on these Proton 8's in the local shop, they were so tight that I didn't think that they would ever pack out enough to accomodate my foot. I don't want to give the false impression that my feet are moving all around in these boots, it's primarily my left heel that is somewhat "fluid". I'm not sure if the local shop will take these back at this point, so I might have to resort to the heel cup or different sock approach. Sorry for being such a newby, and I really do appreciate the help.

Pete
post #13 of 21
Try the heel cup. If not enough check out an eliminator tongue, or a neoprene tongue shim. Either one of those will do a good job of driving the heel down and back in the boot.

Have your fitter check your ankle dorsiflexion Range Of Motion. It is possible that your heel is moving up in the pocket because your ROM is limited. The fix would be raising your heel with a heel lift.

Jim
post #14 of 21
"Fit Aid Pusher":

Sure at first the aids are free then you suck'm in and start charging for the high. I've seen it before, you are not foolin anyone.
post #15 of 21
Tricks of the trade Bud, tricks of the trade.
post #16 of 21
Thread Starter 

Thanks, again!

I already put the heel cup in my left boot last night, JIm, and it seemed to make a difference just walking around. I can't really test it on the local slopes until at least tomorrow, as it's been raining pretty steadily here. Not too many more runs left in this season for me. Hopefully I can get this boot issue resolved before I put everything away until next season. Thanks again, to everyone.

Pete
post #17 of 21
Welcome to Epic Pete! Hope you continue to find valuable info here!
post #18 of 21
Thread Starter 

Thanks, Bud!

My only regret is that I didn't find this site sooner. You are all very generous with your time and advice. Happy Easter to all who read this!

Pete
post #19 of 21
Thread Starter 

One last update.

Today I skied after inserting both of the optional heel cups that came with my boots. A significant difference, to say the least. No movement of either heel, just a nice, snug fit all around. There is a little pressure on the sides of my left heel, but I'll have to see if that diminishes if I get to ski again (back to work on Tuesday). We've had a couple of glorious early Spring skiing days here in Erie, and I took advantage of both of them. Rain and warmer temps, however, are on their way.
post #20 of 21
I'm glad the heel cups worked...just like I suggested first!
post #21 of 21
Thread Starter 

You the man!

You the man...Cantman! Too bad you're all the way on the other side of the state. If you ever get up to Erie, let me know. I'll treat you to lunch at my favorite Mexican restaurant.

Pete
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