or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

So, What's Up With Carving? - Page 3

post #61 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
they are 104mm max probably 94mm waisted B4s.

carving is the ideal turn...but to carve everything is far from ideal. thats what the OP is implying.
Impossible.

B4s have orange on the base. Green is for b3 and squad
post #62 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post
Well, I've read the entire thread and, while the self importance still oozes a bit, I don't see any harm in the banter. I'm no moderator, but I can't see any problems with this thread. Brag away and enjoy yourselves. I won't be locking anyone out. That's up to the mods, I guess.
Thanks for leaving the door open Posaune! I think everyone brought their own beer.:

Quote:
Many skiers will insist they are carving a clean arc because they see two paralell tracks in the snow as it cuts accross the fall line. They ignore the swish in the snow at the very start of the turn or they simply don't see it from their vantage point - mojoman
I don't think anyone here is calling that a carved turn. If the definition is tails following tips I see a lot of people doing that. Even though they're not skiing with rearview mirrors I'll give em the nod of a carve from the lift.

If you eliminate beginners, windshieldwashers, bumpers not trying to carve etc. and only count the people trying to carve what percentage is carving?
Perhaps it's something else you're getting at? Not all those tails following tips turns are great. Force them to change the radius or the pitch gets steeper and things will change. (the mirrors hit the snow )

How many turns would a racer carve if a racer could carve turns? :
post #63 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
How many turns would a racer carve if a racer could carve turns? :
All of them!
post #64 of 67
yah yah greedy racers...

I'm not a racer but I've done a number of multi day race programs. I've always been amazed at how you can completely blow say 39 out of 40 turns but you nail that one turn and that's what brings you back. "I've got to do it again. I know I can get more". Nail two turns the feeling grows. Put together a sequence of three turns where everything goes right and you feel like superman. Then you blow the rest but it doesn't matter. It's very addictive.

The addiction is similar to the powder addiction. Except with powder good skiers pretty much just need to show up and they'll be hootin' and hollerin' after 1 turn. With racing it's like you've got to hack your way through the jungle, fend off attacks from wild animals, dodge spears and arrows from the natives, just to make two great turns. Then back to the jungle in search of turns. At the bottom you can be mangled and bleeding and all you want to do is go back to the jungle to find those turns.

Back to "What's up with carving ?"...
In racing, (or freeskiing actually) what's the most important thing to do to put together a sequence of carved turns on a steep pitch? . In terms of technique what's the key? (this isn't some sort of bizarre test it's a serious question)
post #65 of 67
Race courses are designed to test your ability. If you nail two turns in a row you will be going pretty fast for the next turn. I swear some must be designed so it's impossible to carve them all. That's where practice runs come in handy, so you know just how fast you can go and what corners you need to scrub speed on.


Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post
The point here is about turn inititation. Once the skis are on edge it is a relatively simple affair to ride out the edges with no tail displacement. Not much in skiing gets easier than that. This requires neither great skill or timing. Initiating the turn cleanly and smoothly without any tail displacement requires both great skill and precise timing with both edges and is something rarely seen. Most of what people refer to as carving is really nothing but scarving that is planted into a rigid and static park-n-ride.
I find it pretty to initiate a carved turn. Maintaining that edge lock as I make the turn tighter and tighter, especially as the skis come 90 degrees to the fall line and gravity adds its weight to the mix is the hard part.

Living in the land of hard packed conditions and small hills, you find ways to amuse yourself. I've combined seeing how hard I can turn with how suddenly I can release the turn. A very dynamic cross-under can make initiating the next turn tricky, and sometimes a little impatience to get going at the top of a slope calls for a pivot, but other than that initiation is not a problem.
post #66 of 67
Well, I mainly carve because I can ski fast AND in control (yet some scrubs still complain about me going too fast).

Let me give a timeline of my skiing experience (ages 6-15)

Age 6: First started skiing, advanced on to blues pretty quickly, but still with a pretty big snowplow.

Age 7: Made my snowplow smaller, made less turns, became in a way, speedier.

Age 8: Became a speed addict, went straight down blues in a tuck (egg position) with a slight snowplow (I never realized I had a slight snowplow, always thought I was parallel)

Age 9: Realized I had been looking very newbish by tucking down a hill with a "pizza", so I straightened my skis, got my feet to shoulder width, and started skidding turns, although still not very many turns.

Age 10: Idolized ski racers (I'm too far from any decent mountain to ski race), started trying to ski like them, worked up a half-decent "scarve".

Age 11-12: Working up my scarve to a good level, a level where a newbie skier would think that I was "pro", especially for my very small size (like 4'8" at the time).

Age 13-15: Started really carving (or at least I think it is), and varying from small to large radius turns.

As you can see, I still like to ski fast, but also in control. Now I carve because when I do so, i can control my speed, and the g-forces you feel when carving are just phenomenal, especially when you really put as much pressure as you can when carving (although if I do that, my quads get tired by the end of the run).

Now if only I could get half-decent skis for carving....
post #67 of 67
Quote:
How many turns would a racer carve if a racer could carve turns? :
That's a very deep and meaningful question -- kinda like how much wood could a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood? Sorry, just couldn't make my fingers stop!


Quote:
I've always been amazed at how you can completely blow say 39 out of 40 turns but you nail that one turn and that's what brings you back. "I've got to do it again. I know I can get more". Nail two turns the feeling grows. Put together a sequence of three turns where everything goes right and you feel like superman. Then you blow the rest but it doesn't matter. It's very addictive.
So true! It's the same with golf, which is also addictive. Even in the worst round, scorewise, there are enough good swings to keep you coming back for more! One reason I personally like match play -- you can make up a few absolutely terrible holes and end up winning some money in the end! (This is particularly true if you are a female playing from the forward tees -- and the rest of the group are men. ) But seriously, there is something that feels just magical about both a good golf swing and a good turn.

DEP

P.S. the quoted text is Tog's.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching