or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Boot repair (Good one!!!) in Seattle?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Boot repair (Good one!!!) in Seattle?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Tried to pick up a demo of the Legend 8000 and/or Watea 84 at Sturtevants in Bellevue, WA to make a decision on which during SJ's sales. Contrary to what they told me over the phone ("We have both in 176 and 178"), they had neither when I got there and the person who is the main guy for demos left early. They also tried to convince me that the Mantra or AC40 are really very comparable to the 8000 and that is really what I want to demo. Geez! I am really starting to hate that store!! :

But I digress...... It looks my planned trip to either Crystal or Mt. Baker may not happen tomorrow. It might also be a blessing in disguise that the shop had neither ski I wanted to demo. When I got home, I found the bolt/screw securing the outer pivot point of the cuff on my right Tecnica Icon DPXR boot missing....... again. Couple of months ago I already had it repaired once at the Stevens Pass shop during which the very helpful technician retapped the aluminum thread of the female part, but also had to put in a slightly larger bolt. That is now gone again.

Any recommendations on what I could do (besides buying new boots)? I really wanted to go skiing tomorrow morning, but I also don't want to drive all that way with neither the skis I want to demo nor even a working boot.
This is getting ridiculous.

Note: I was also planning on writing up my review/comparison of the Legend 8000 and MRs in ~172 cm each (sizes that were really too short for me) that I was able to conduct at Mt. Baker this past week, but I am afraid that the night and day experience I had between the two skis may have been partially due to a defective boot (as happened during another demo late last year).

Any recommendations on what to do regarding this pivot bolt continually popping out on my boots would be greatly appreciated.

I really want to do some final demos and buy some skis!! Maybe I will end up buying new boots instead!!

BigNick
post #2 of 11
Not much I can think of that will help you today. Since the fastener was drilled and threaded, no telling what screw/bolt fits unless you have the right diagnostic tools.

You could come from the inside/out with a very flat head bolt and fasten with a nut on the exterior, then dremmel off any extra bolt. Could cause problems with ankle bone, however. Trial and error...

If you like the boot and want to replace with same, Al's Ski Barn (www.untracked.com) shows new remaining stock in 11/12/13 (29.0 -31.0) sizes. $199

Good luck!
post #3 of 11
Ha, did you see SJ's post Yesterday!? Boots coming soon!!!
post #4 of 11
Call Jim Mates at Custom Boot Service in Seattle. He's in the book. If anyone could fix you up, he can. It won't help you for today, though.
post #5 of 11
I've heard good things about Mates.

I'd also totally trust Gerk's Alpine Hut in Redmond for this sort of thing if you happen to be east side oriented. I'm not sure if they'd run into any brand specific h/w issues as I don't think they are carrying Tecnica these days (not 100% sure off the top of my head).
post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
Medmarkco-
Yeah, I was thinking of something similar. I wonder if the Tacoma Screw shop is open today. They probably have the best selection of bolts around. I should be able to find something that would work. I also, took a look at Al's Barn. They don't seem to have the same model, but there are similar types.

Trekchik-
As for SJ's upcoming boot sale, don't tempt me . Its been hard enough to narrow down my planned purchase of skis let alone complicating the whole issue with getting a new pair of boots too. Wouldn't I now have to also try the skis all over again with a new pair of boots to get just the right combo (Its kind of like matching speakers to an amp/preamp)

Actually, it took me a long time to get my size 14 narrow feet (very narrow heel) with long toes (2nd longer than big toe) and fairly wide toe area to fit into my Icons size 12 shell - lots of shaving, pressing, shell expansion, custom orthotics, and heel lifts. I don't think I could handle the"pain" of it all again - figuratively and actually! Ha Ha!.

But then again..... I am a glutton for punishment.....

BigNick
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigNick View Post
Tried to pick up a demo of the Legend 8000 and/or Watea 84 at Sturtevants in Bellevue, WA to make a decision on which during SJ's sales. Contrary to what they told me over the phone ("We have both in 176 and 178"), they had neither when I got there and the person who is the main guy for demos left early. They also tried to convince me that the Mantra or AC40 are really very comparable to the 8000 and that is really what I want to demo. Geez! I am really starting to hate that store!! :

But I digress...... It looks my planned trip to either Crystal or Mt. Baker may not happen tomorrow. It might also be a blessing in disguise that the shop had neither ski I wanted to demo. When I got home, I found the bolt/screw securing the outer pivot point of the cuff on my right Tecnica Icon DPXR boot missing....... again. Couple of months ago I already had it repaired once at the Stevens Pass shop during which the very helpful technician retapped the aluminum thread of the female part, but also had to put in a slightly larger bolt. That is now gone again.

Any recommendations on what I could do (besides buying new boots)? I really wanted to go skiing tomorrow morning, but I also don't want to drive all that way with neither the skis I want to demo nor even a working boot.
This is getting ridiculous.

Note: I was also planning on writing up my review/comparison of the Legend 8000 and MRs in ~172 cm each (sizes that were really too short for me) that I was able to conduct at Mt. Baker this past week, but I am afraid that the night and day experience I had between the two skis may have been partially due to a defective boot (as happened during another demo late last year).

Any recommendations on what to do regarding this pivot bolt continually popping out on my boots would be greatly appreciated.

I really want to do some final demos and buy some skis!! Maybe I will end up buying new boots instead!!

BigNick

So looks like you liked the 8000 more than the MRs, right?

Alex
post #8 of 11
Not same?

http://www.untracked.com/p213-03_tec...ski_boots.html

Jim Mates is great and would definitely fix you up when you get back (assuming you figure a way to ski today). I'm with you on seeking out a new boot - you know what has to be done with this one ... just don't wait until there are no options before searching for the replacements.
post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
Medmarkco,
Geez... my boot screw must not be the only one I have loose. I didn't find that listing the first time. Thanks. Yes, Jim Mates would be a good choice. On the other hand, is $200 for a pair of boots for spare parts really such a bad idea.... I could always mix and match as necessary. There might be cheaper options though too.

Alexzn (an others),
I was going to refrain from making a comparison of the MRs and the 8000s since I was skiing both in one size (172) too short for me; I really wanted to compare them in 178. Now with the added complication of not knowing exactly when the boot pivot bolt popped out (probably when I was changing skis and had to remove and replace the boot), I don't want to taint the results.

But here goes anyways....
Just a reminder, I am 6'2" 180-184 butt naked. I ski all over the mountains and like to play in the deeper snow but also in the moguls. I prefer off-piste.

I skied the 8000s in a 172 in the morning at Mt. Baker last Tuesday. It had snowed the day/night before resulting in about 9" of typical PNW snow (moisture laden). I had a late start so not much untracked snow left. I found the 8000s very easy to ski through everything. I could either ski them with old-school or modern technique. They were easy to turn at either slow or moderately high speeds too. They do have a wide sweet spot and I never had to hunt for proper fore-aft position. In the deeper and "crud"/mashed potatoes snow, they would get bounced around a bit, but I would never lose track of where I would want to go. They would always return to the proper direction; and were very easy to turn. Although tips would bounce around a bit, I was always in control. Some people might find it a bit disconcerting; but I don't feel that way at all. I would liken the 8000s to skiing on flexible rails in opposition to stiff/solid rails. Both get you to where you want to go; but the flexible ones give you more choices on how to get there. I really liked the 8000s and think I would have like them even more in 178 (not sure about 184). The tip on one of the skis did submarine once in the deeper heavy snow when I was playing and I ended up twisted up like a pretzel - naturally under the chair lift for all to see -but that was more pilot-error than a ski problem.

I didn't get to take the 8000s up to really high speeds since the snow was slow, so I never found their speed limit. (Actually, I don't think skis have speed limits, only skiers do ). At the end of the morning, I took them on a steeper sun-drenched slope which was full of tall, tightly-spaced moguls consisting of mashed potatoes over hard cores. I was able to get through the field with some fun and style, but it wasn't my prettiest endeavor. No one else seemed to be skiing that slope - I think I found out why. As I said, I could do it. (Remember this mogul field).

In the afternoon, I took out the 172 Mythics (MRs). I was really looking forward to it because I thought the added stiffness would be perfect for the snow conditions of the day. (I had skied the MRs in 178 in Colorado in some light dry snow and really loved them too). This time, though, I was disappointed. It was like "night and day". I would never have expected such a big difference especially in such a short length of ski. Although I could ski the MRs in the glop, they would tend to go straight when I wanted them to turn - exact opposite of the 8000s. Yes, they were more stable at higher speeds and didn't get bounced around, but they weren't much fun to ski in the glop - much more work to try to get quick turns in the heavy snow those times that I could actually do it. Granted, these need more speed and I was not skiing the real steep sections and the snow was really slow. On this day, I just could not find a good stance on them to get them to respond to my instructions. I always seemed to be hunting for the proper forward/rearward pressure to get them to respond, and I found myself often falling into the back seat. Much different than my experience with the skis in Colorado in the longer 178 length.

I also took them into that tight mashed-potato mogul field on the steep section that I tried earlier with the 8000s. It was not good and it was not pretty! The shortness and the stiffness of the MRs seemed to accentuate my getting banged up on the moguls. There was not much cushioning. I know technique is really important in moguls, especially the tight heavy ones, but these skis were not good for this type. (I have been wondering if the longer versions 178 might be more amenable to such a field since they would provide a wider flex pattern and potentially absorb more shock).

I will add the caveat though, that it is highly possible that the pivot point on my boot broke when I switched to the MRs in the shop since I have to really pull apart the shell to get my foot in. So some of this dissapointment with the MRs on this specific day in these specific conditions might have been due to that.

So, on this day, skiing the 8000s and MRs in one size too short for me, I definitely preferred the 8000s for an all-mountain ski. If I was ONLY going to do wider turns at high speeds and in deep snow, the MRs would have been a more appropriate choice. I would really like to do a final comparison of these two skis in a 178 (and with a repaired boot) on the same day. Unfortunately, Mt. Baker only has them in a 172. I am also still considering the Watea 84 in the 176 (as per SJs suggestion) or 184. It might be a good compromise between the 8000 and the MRs.

BigNick
post #10 of 11
I see. Well, I own the old 8K's in 178 (and as of now also own the new MR's in 178). 8000 is a fantastic ski, destined to become one of all-time classic skis, playful, it can turn on groomed with the best carvers out there, it can ski moguls, it can ski mash, steeps and do it all with a phenomenal dose of fun thrown in the mix. I was reminded about it Friday- I had an absolute blast skiing the 8K in all sorts of mixed conditions. The only thing confusing it is crudy snow. So that ski is not going anywhere from my quiver...;-)

The MRs for me were much more stable, burly, and noticeably faster, yet I still was able to turn them as much as I wanted to, and as quick as I needed. The straightish sidecut was good on the steeps. The only thing I was not happy with was a mogul field (and I tend to like those), but that was an acceptable tradeoff for me (and remember I still have the 8K's for that). So I hope that the MR will become my default Tahoe ski, and lately I find that I tend to use the groomed slopes only as a means to get to something else, so I can take a more freeride-oriented ski. As a wekender I see crud more than I see anything else, so that was the motivation for getting a really goo crud buster.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BigNick View Post
Medmarkco,
Geez... my boot screw must not be the only one I have loose. I didn't find that listing the first time. Thanks. Yes, Jim Mates would be a good choice. On the other hand, is $200 for a pair of boots for spare parts really such a bad idea.... I could always mix and match as necessary. There might be cheaper options though too.

Alexzn (an others),
I was going to refrain from making a comparison of the MRs and the 8000s since I was skiing both in one size (172) too short for me; I really wanted to compare them in 178. Now with the added complication of not knowing exactly when the boot pivot bolt popped out (probably when I was changing skis and had to remove and replace the boot), I don't want to taint the results.

But here goes anyways....
Just a reminder, I am 6'2" 180-184 butt naked. I ski all over the mountains and like to play in the deeper snow but also in the moguls. I prefer off-piste.

I skied the 8000s in a 172 in the morning at Mt. Baker last Tuesday. It had snowed the day/night before resulting in about 9" of typical PNW snow (moisture laden). I had a late start so not much untracked snow left. I found the 8000s very easy to ski through everything. I could either ski them with old-school or modern technique. They were easy to turn at either slow or moderately high speeds too. They do have a wide sweet spot and I never had to hunt for proper fore-aft position. In the deeper and "crud"/mashed potatoes snow, they would get bounced around a bit, but I would never lose track of where I would want to go. They would always return to the proper direction; and were very easy to turn. Although tips would bounce around a bit, I was always in control. Some people might find it a bit disconcerting; but I don't feel that way at all. I would liken the 8000s to skiing on flexible rails in opposition to stiff/solid rails. Both get you to where you want to go; but the flexible ones give you more choices on how to get there. I really liked the 8000s and think I would have like them even more in 178 (not sure about 184). The tip on one of the skis did submarine once in the deeper heavy snow when I was playing and I ended up twisted up like a pretzel - naturally under the chair lift for all to see -but that was more pilot-error than a ski problem.

I didn't get to take the 8000s up to really high speeds since the snow was slow, so I never found their speed limit. (Actually, I don't think skis have speed limits, only skiers do ). At the end of the morning, I took them on a steeper sun-drenched slope which was full of tall, tightly-spaced moguls consisting of mashed potatoes over hard cores. I was able to get through the field with some fun and style, but it wasn't my prettiest endeavor. No one else seemed to be skiing that slope - I think I found out why. As I said, I could do it. (Remember this mogul field).

In the afternoon, I took out the 172 Mythics (MRs). I was really looking forward to it because I thought the added stiffness would be perfect for the snow conditions of the day. (I had skied the MRs in 178 in Colorado in some light dry snow and really loved them too). This time, though, I was disappointed. It was like "night and day". I would never have expected such a big difference especially in such a short length of ski. Although I could ski the MRs in the glop, they would tend to go straight when I wanted them to turn - exact opposite of the 8000s. Yes, they were more stable at higher speeds and didn't get bounced around, but they weren't much fun to ski in the glop - much more work to try to get quick turns in the heavy snow those times that I could actually do it. Granted, these need more speed and I was not skiing the real steep sections and the snow was really slow. On this day, I just could not find a good stance on them to get them to respond to my instructions. I always seemed to be hunting for the proper forward/rearward pressure to get them to respond, and I found myself often falling into the back seat. Much different than my experience with the skis in Colorado in the longer 178 length.

I also took them into that tight mashed-potato mogul field on the steep section that I tried earlier with the 8000s. It was not good and it was not pretty! The shortness and the stiffness of the MRs seemed to accentuate my getting banged up on the moguls. There was not much cushioning. I know technique is really important in moguls, especially the tight heavy ones, but these skis were not good for this type. (I have been wondering if the longer versions 178 might be more amenable to such a field since they would provide a wider flex pattern and potentially absorb more shock).

I will add the caveat though, that it is highly possible that the pivot point on my boot broke when I switched to the MRs in the shop since I have to really pull apart the shell to get my foot in. So some of this dissapointment with the MRs on this specific day in these specific conditions might have been due to that.

So, on this day, skiing the 8000s and MRs in one size too short for me, I definitely preferred the 8000s for an all-mountain ski. If I was ONLY going to do wider turns at high speeds and in deep snow, the MRs would have been a more appropriate choice. I would really like to do a final comparison of these two skis in a 178 (and with a repaired boot) on the same day. Unfortunately, Mt. Baker only has them in a 172. I am also still considering the Watea 84 in the 176 (as per SJs suggestion) or 184. It might be a good compromise between the 8000 and the MRs.

BigNick
post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
Alex,

I'm jealous !!! I think the combo (2-ski quiver) of the MRs and the 8000 you have is really nice. Some people might say that there is too much overlap in the two skis. I think the amount of overlap is perfect. You could take either ski with you on any given day and not curse yourself about having the wrong one. I would hate to have to take 2 skis with me when I travel.

I also agree with you on the utility of the MRs. They are really nice and if I could do both skis, I would probably do exactly what you did. I want to do more off-piste and possibly backcountry and the potential power (we won't mention the weight) of the MRs would be really nice. But I also don't always have the flexibility of going when and where I want to ski, so I need something a bit more versatile in terms of the low end. I sometimes ski with friends who don't venture out on the more steep and difficult slopes, so I need a ski that I can also enjoy on more moderate slopes and do the bump/mogul sections of lower blacks and upper blues and venture into the trees to entertain myself while skiing with them. I think the softer flex of the 8000s (or Watea 84) are more suited to that. Therefore, I am leaning towards that side. BUT, I wish I could try the 178 MRs and 178 8000s side-by-side on a given day. Its just virtually impossible to do that (unless I want to pay for 2 demos at the same time from a shop) and the snow conditions in the WA area are quickly deteriorating.

I still am curious about the Watea 84 and wonder if it would be a good compromise between the 8000s and MRs.

Update on boot problem and a potential purchase.....

I went to REI yesterday. They had the perfectly matching bolt, washer, and nut, for my cuff pivot point for my Tecnica Icons. The guy gave them to me for free. I didn't have to replace the actual canting plate since I was lucky enough to find it in the grass next to my car. Amazing that it fell off there and not when the bolt disappeared at the slope.

But I did something else too while I was at REI. While waiting, I spotted one pair of the Legend 8000s with the fluid system there which were on sale for $420 plus tax. It is a 184, so it might be too long for me; but I'm not sure. I asked them to put it on hold for me. I am seriously considering buying that today and just holding on to them. If I do get a chance to try the 178 8000s and the Watea 84s and decide I don't need the 184 8000s, I can always return them, especially if I don't use them at all. On the other hand, I might try the 184 length (no shop has that for demoing) and if it is too long for me, I might be able to sell it on this forum to a local.

Did you ever try the 8000s in a 184?

BigNick
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Boot repair (Good one!!!) in Seattle?