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What Ski ?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hello all!

I know, I know too many posts about this matter.
BTW, my question is a bit different of the other ones.

I'm an intermediate(maybe level 6) skier who skies just few(unfortunately) days/year. Mainly at groomed terrain. I'm trying to understand the differences between the several brands and models and, would to be, at least a little more knowledge about it, in order to chose a good stuff to rent on my next time.

This year, for the first time, I rented a "top" set, the store leverage as "beginer", "top" and "competition" skies.

They bring me a Fisher Cool Heat. And I must to say, I felt nothing better than the last year Salomon "beginer" that I rented. :

Of course, I don't know about the radius and other important measures of those skies.

What I would to know is, in fact, how to know if they are giving me the correct skies or not.

Could any one help me?

Thanks in advance!
Eduardo
post #2 of 11
The Cool Heat is definitely a good ski, so I think they were being fair in billing that as an upgrade. As you discovered, that doesn't necessarily mean it will upgrade your skiing experience. On the contrary, a higher-end ski may actually be more difficult if you're in the intermediate range. At the minimum, you may notice no real difference if you're not getting the ski up on edge and carving.
post #3 of 11
You also have to get a ski that is designed for the type of skiing you are going to do. For example a equally good ski more suited to skiing on groomed hardpack terrain would be RX8. If you are just skidding turns in a wedge, you won't notice much difference between skis. If you are slicing turns on your edes at a good clip you will notice the difference.

Almost every ski will have a "sidecut radius" marked on it. This corresponds to radius of the largest turn you can carve in a pure arc with the ski on a hard surface. If you want to make smaller turns get a ski with a smaller radius. If you want to make really large turns at higher speeds, get a ski with a larger radius.

Skis less than 70 mm in width at the narrowest point work better on hardpack. Wider skis work better in deeper softer snow.

Stiffer skis work better when you are putting more force through them to the snow by skiing faster and making tighter turns on hardpack. Softer skis work better with lower forces, going slower or skiing softer deeper snow.
post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
You also have to get a ski that is designed for the type of skiing you are going to do. For example a equally good ski more suited to skiing on groomed hardpack terrain would be RX8. If you are just skidding turns in a wedge, you won't notice much difference between skis. If you are slicing turns on your edes at a good clip you will notice the difference.

Almost every ski will have a "sidecut radius" marked on it. This corresponds to radius of the largest turn you can carve in a pure arc with the ski on a hard surface. If you want to make smaller turns get a ski with a smaller radius. If you want to make really large turns at higher speeds, get a ski with a larger radius.

Skis less than 70 mm in width at the narrowest point work better on hardpack. Wider skis work better in deeper softer snow.

Stiffer skis work better when you are putting more force through them to the snow by skiing faster and making tighter turns on hardpack. Softer skis work better with lower forces, going slower or skiing softer deeper snow.
very imformative post you wrote
post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks!!

Let me explain a bit more in order you can better understand my point.

Last year, we(wife, son and myself) skied at Tremblant, begin of December, with Atomic.
Must to say, about half mountain open, great snow, not much deep, well groomed.

We had no difficult to ski the greens(of course), blues and the blacks, since the conditions were very good. Not the double diamond, we don't felt enough confidence.

My son change the ski set for a advanced one on the last day. He said about how better the boot fits(sure I can imagine), more than the increase in the speed, he could make turns with lees effort and gain confidence, cos he feels in control all the time.

After that I decide to rent a better equipment in next time on the mountains.

This year we go to Stubaier-Gleschter, Austria. A fantastic place for sure!!
The ski experience there is totally different. Large pistes, no trees.
I get the Cool heat and my son a Pure Heat.
The levels are a little bit mixed, that said, some times the difficult changes hard on the same piste, with no signal. The snow was deeper and I think a bit harder. Despite the fact of the pistes are groomed, they do it passing the cats not so close one-to-another, something as one meter remain between one cat and another one. If you make big turns you pass these locals and spread the snow. Many people doing it and on the middle of the day, the terrain seen as full of bumps. OK, little and soft bumps, but, it changes the way you skies in the morning and in the afternoon.

For the morning, the Coolheat works well. But to the afternoon, or for more mixed terrain, I suffered to remain in control wen speed's up. I felt very unstable.

And, yes, I can skies in the edges. This year I begin some carvings.

Some advice on the type of skies for the next time?? We are thinking in go to Whistler, begin of December.

But, thanks again for the tips.
Eduardo
post #6 of 11
How long were your Coolheat skis?
post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
I don't know exactly, but I'm 170 cm and the skies were up to my nose,I think around 150cm, maybe 155cm.
post #8 of 11
It sounds to me like the skis were too short. Often the shorter lengths of skis are not as stable as longer ones in the same model. I guess they figure if your going to go fast you will buy the longer ski.

That being said, you could also be noticing something that feels unstable but really isn't. Let me explain.

While I personally haven't tried the Heat series of ski from Fischer, I have tried their RX8 and RC4 WC skis, along with Atomic Balance, SX10 and SX11 among others while I was researching wht skis to buy to bring me into the modern era. I was used to Super-G skis.

The atomics had a substancial feeling to them and felt like they would be rock steady no matter what, until you actually hit their speed limit, at which the skis were virtually useless. The Fischer RX8 on the other hand felt like to me at the time like I was skiing on a plastic credit card. It was a leap of faith to believe that they would hold at speed, but when push came to shove, they could handle the speed just fine. They only felt incredibly light, almost as though they weren't there. I could also feel every perturbation in the snow. The atomics just crushed everything in their path without any qualms.

Maybe you just like the Atomic feel, but before giving up on the Fischers, you should try one that is about 10 cm longer.

You should also be aware that a ski with a smaller sidecut radius will want to hunt back and forth looking for turns when you try to run the flat and straight. That's pretty much common to any small radius ski. It doesn't stop the ski from turning where you want it to go at speed though.
post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the response Ghost!!!!

Yes, I agree with your concerns. But, remember I'm skiing with rented equipment, few days a year and it's very hard to know about different skies and so on.

But basically, you get the point. I'm not confident with the Fisher, mainly on mixed terrain and I have had lots of bumps and mixed condition's pistes at Stubai. Sometimes you begin from the top on a blue/black well groomed, suddenly it turns full of bumps, suddenly icy and, at the final, you are completely tired. I need to say, it's amazing, you run to the chair to do it again and again. But I'm not confident, you knew you was not in control all the time...

As you said "...I could also feel every perturbation in the snow. .. " That's it! For who have a little experience...

I think this kind probably be my preference "...The atomics just crushed everything in their path without any qualms. ..."

A question: you think is better to me longest skies? My main concern is stability not speed.

And, for sure the Fisher cool heat probably is a very good stuff. I cannot say the same about the skier

What I'm trying to do is getting some information on it, in order to better chose next time.

Cheers,
Eduardo
post #10 of 11
I would recommend a ski in about 170 cm for on piste. You will have to search long and hard to beat a Fischer RC4 WC SC, but I doubt you will find very many of those for rent. If you are going to whistler, you will want something fatter.

Probably something from Atomic, Head (maybe SS Magnum) or Dynastar will have you feeling more secure. I'll let the Western skiers advise you here.

If you feel like subscribing to realskiers.com, for 20 bucks you will get very good reviews to help you choose.
post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
Ops!

"... If you feel like subscribing to realskiers.com, for 20 bucks you will get very good reviews to help you choose...."

No thanks, I've been getting good reviews from here for free!

BTW, I'll post on travel threads, asking for information about Whistler, if you could give some tips... my sincere thanks in advance!

Once again, thanks for your great information!

Regards,
Eduardo
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