or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

SofaSkiSchool Video? - Page 2

post #31 of 53
Man's a legend. Sells more private lessons than anybody at Mammoth Mountain. Someone cancels and he has people lining up to take their spot.
post #32 of 53

I bought the Klaus Video and found it to be the best instruction I'v ever had.

 

I go to ski school for a week every year ( past ten years ) and all the lessons teach the same techniques as are in the video but his explanations and demos have shown me the way.  I now "get it" about separating the skis, getting them on edge and putting weight on the uphill ski as the downhill ski is extended.

 

Tried this out at Mammoth last weekend and it really helped.  My only complaint is,  new aches in muscles that I was not using previously.

 

You can teach an old dog new tricks, I'm 71 and still learning.  I started at nine.

 

Rebbe

 

post #33 of 53

for all beginners and intermediates:

the video below is my cut of training with Klaus Mair in lech-zurs. i began skiing feb08, first real education from adrian seligman in sunshine village, alberta, who taught me to "walk" so to speak; further skiing with chuck "snowhawk" seymour at catamount, upstate new york, both of whom helped develop my basic skill-set and confidence;

then with klaus in lech-zurs, austria, april 09.

 

KM taught me :

(a) to let gravity do more than i was willing earlier

(b) slowed me down and exposed all that is flawed and learn again, that was so damned hard..

(c) especially as the terrain was a lot steeper than what i had skiied, taught me key skill, how to side-slip calmly down steeper terrain

(d) how to negotiate corn powder, mogulled to the gills.

(e)  got rid of stem-step on right turn initiation, my weaker turn, i had, its gone except for when bad old habit peeks out but its pretty rare.

(f) weaker right turn finally improved, still got to work on it but generally upper-body counter-rotation facing downhill showed marked sustenance given history of massive upper-body steering

(g) controlled ripping..

 

this cut is mine and parts of the film is from a sony camera whose conversion is not the best, and film is 10 mins but for beginners and intermediates could be interesting to see the progression over a week..first 5.5mins is training and then results i think begin to show..from 5min 20 sec marker;

dont kid yourselves, this was unparalleled exhilaration, but boot-camp, all the way, body got destroyed daily...!

 

pardon my film editing skills, just put it together for self-analysis, and burning into my neurons..am just trying to keep up with my boy..but he has pulled away decisively! for all of dad's dedicated relentless efforts..(watch 42-46 sec part, the weary stress shows, early on in boot-camp with KM)

 

..

 


Edited by dustyfog - 5/2/2009 at 09:34 pm GMT


Edited by dustyfog - 5/2/2009 at 09:41 pm GMT


Edited by dustyfog - 5/3/2009 at 12:41 am GMT


Edited by dustyfog - 5/3/2009 at 12:42 am GMT
post #34 of 53
Funny, I just happened to see this thread...was watching Sofa Ski School last night!  As an intermediate skier I too, have many videos--including the Laws of Lito series--.  SSS is so fun to watch.  Here's a guy who is charismatic, has a sense of humor, and absolutely rips these techniques.  I laugh because he's instructing people like myself and gets going so fast he even loses contact with the snow.  Love it!
post #35 of 53
I had an interest in the DVD's as well until I saw that the only testimonial was from this forum!!
post #36 of 53
Klaus Mair mixes several skiing styles in his stuff, and he is such an excellent athlete that he can pull it off.  He does not show a single consistent skiing style that will work for everybody, all mountain, all conditions, every day.  Some of his skiing shows great inclination.  Some shows great angulation.  Some shows great tip lead.  Some shows little tip lead.  I don't think his stuff will allow the average doofus to become a consistently better all mountain skier.

Spindrift, yes, Lito's stuff is dated by now, and I disagree with one of his points that extending the outside leg is the same as flexing the inside leg--it isn't.  Other than that, and allowing for the development of equipment since he was last active, Lito's stuff is very good.  PM me and we can try for a ski day together at Crystal if you'd like.
post #37 of 53
Being from Europe I have to say that this in no way represents the "euro style" teaching.

I bought this DVD a few years back and my feelings are mixed. I bought it primarily because I was teaching my kids to ski and I wanted to find some good drills. This is the best part of the DVD, it contains a lot of good drills for beginners and it is possible to pick up a decent carving technique in a short time.

What I don't like about the DVD and his skiing style is:
- He rotates the hip outwards in the turn. A lot! European skiing advocates that the hip should be turned inwards in the turn. This outward rotation will give you problems when the conditions are tricky. You can easily end up in the back chair. I tried to start a debate about this in TDKs track filming thread, but no response so far.
- Very little dynamics. He does not extend into the turns very much. He basically stands in a static position until he angulates the skis the other way. Just look at the quick short turn. They might be fun and it takes some skill to do them without loosing control, but where is the retraction?
-Edging is primarily with knee/hip angulation. Edging in the early phase of the turn should be primarily inclination (with extension).

Side note, the WC version of Dobermann does not have a 11.5 m radius, at least not the 165 FIS race-stock (I own a pair)

Edit: I didn't notice this thread was started years ago.
Edited by Jamt - 1/28/10 at 2:00am
post #38 of 53
A confusing thread. An early implication that the guy in the first video was Max. Later we learn he uses Edelweiss skis...

Quote:
Originally Posted by SimonColyer View Post

Man's a legend. Sells more private lessons than anybody at Mammoth Mountain. Someone cancels and he has people lining up to take their spot.
post #39 of 53
In either case, took the plunge and bought the DVD on Ebay for a mere $19.95 (incl free shipping!)...I was impressed enough with the guy's skiing and straightforward approach and if you think about it, there is very little by way of instruction out there that's current, provocative and informative.

Will let you know how it goes!
post #40 of 53
 Swisstrader : how was your encounter with the inimitable Klaus Mair, electronically nonetheless, what did you think, feel, learn? or not?
post #41 of 53
I also bought this DVD and have to say it got me to learn simple things: how to get in the proper position in the steeps by "angulating", to control the skis by leaning forward, and to "Face the danger" to avoid skiing in the back seat. The main drill about putting your hand on your outside knee and taking the other arm and pointing it down the valley gave me the confidence to advance to a black run. It is a great dvd, worth the money!
post #42 of 53
I  really also have to add that at my level anyway, I liked the Bode Miller and US Ski Coach guy DVD, you get each clip on Youtube too, ActionSportsSkool or something like that. There is something about the way Bode talks through things, seems quite natural for the beginner/intermediate for sure, I mean he is the one guy who on tape talks about killing speed at the TOP of a turn, most others in books (like the DesLaurier book or Lito Flores) effectively talk about killing speed at the bottom of the turn, which may be great for the experts but killing at the top, smearing the turn etc is so much better but not the easiest thing to do though. Amazon has the DVD.
post #43 of 53
I highly recommend his DVD. This is my first year of skiing and I learned how to carve after watching his lessons. I'm sure most of you would benefit more from his video because he has tons of awesome advanced drills!

When I just started out, everyone who skis parallel look like expert to me. After watching Mair's "diagnosis" videos, I realize most people ski poorly down the slope, and only handful of instructors are decent.

He demonstrated common problems such as skiing in the backseat, upper body rotation to steer the turn, and leaning towards the outside ski. I see these problems all the time on the slopes and make me want to close my eyes on the chair lift to avoid picking up these bad habits subconsciously.
post #44 of 53
The video is actually quite good...clear, crisp descriptions, lots of drills and limited technical jargon. My only downside is 1) the underlying theme of the DVD is first figure out what your doing wrong (a big assumption that I can self asses my skiing!) and 2) it was a bit difficult to navigate the DVD (I was not always sure where I was in the lessons).

Defnitely worth the money in either case.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dustyfog View Post

 Swisstrader : how was your encounter with the inimitable Klaus Mair, electronically nonetheless, what did you think, feel, learn? or not?
post #45 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by dustyfog View Post

 I mean he is the one guy who on tape talks about killing speed at the TOP of a turn, most others in books (like the DesLaurier book or Lito Flores) effectively talk about killing speed at the bottom of the turn, which may be great for the experts but killing at the top, smearing the turn etc is so much better but not the easiest thing to do though.
 
Dustyfog, in racing and expert skiing speed should be killed as much as possible before the fall line. The art of scrubbing off speed before the fallline and then edge-locking at exacly the right moment is really expert domain IMO. It might be simple enough in easy groomers, but not in expert terrain.
post #46 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by ExoticSkis View Post

What do people think of this little vid?
Looks like Klaus Mair sells his own DVD at the website.
I like his dynamic images and good editing of the video segments.
$35 usd.

Comments?
I always love to hear the US vs. European teaching debates...


Stance is a little bit too open and has a bit too much tip lead, but other than that a great progression. I think a demo should be performed on a harder snow surface, you can see the skis better and almost anything can be done in soft snow and it just never gets mentioned to the student that this actually could make a big difference.
I am not familiar with the North Amerikan program, but I hear that this is something that progressions hardly exist there?
Also a Ski school program can only be as good as their instructors which have to demo the skills and drills. Sometimes I wonder how some people in NA can even get past the entrance exam to be an instructor based on their own level of skiing. What is the criteria to become an instructor and pass the exam there?
post #47 of 53
SimplyFast - having actually skiied with Klaus and instructors here on the United States east coast Chuck Seymour, and at Alta, Tom Cadura. I would say all are great instructors. It was at different stages in my evolution as a skier and am still evolving. I learnt the most basic stuff about skiing from Chuck, then with Klaus I learnt about how to get down big mountain steeps calmly and all about believing and letting gravity do its thing, and he taught my son a ton of basics and the beginning of serious carving (my boy had just turned 6 in that month), and finally with Tom C at Alta - I learnt the key issues related to skiing a ton of snow, with very little or no grooming and real powder (some of it). I would say all were great, different age groups in terms of their vintage, Klaus is mid-30s, Chuck is almost 60, and Tom is early 40's. I have "progressed" for sure...

see this thread on my comment on comparing the methods briefly for beginners Europeans vs Americans: just one guy's personal perspective.
http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/91869/how-to-do-the-non-carving-parallel-turn#post_1192422

Tom C at Alta was the one who finally helped correct that fact that I could barely get on inside edges (seriously bow-legged, with Klaus i did a few airborne in-air 360's on flattish slopes and he noticed I was on my outside edges !!!) etc, and the work with bootfitters thereafter has made an immeasurable difference and the boots are not fixed yet but the change is incredible.  Also, he introduced me to Dynastar Sultan Legend 85's - what skis, I use them in NEast hardpack and they are good for me in Alta. His point was my skiing had improved beyond the short carvers I was used to and needed a pretty stiff pile-driver, and man, does that ski blast through stuff, love it. You should have seen the incredible bend/contortions/angulations I had to execute to get a major edge angle out of my skis...just tipping was doing diddly squat until the boot-fixes occurred, no wonder I struggled often. I could not skate, and my little boy would give me lessons on it, all much improved now.

So in summary, instructors on both continents have been great. Klaus and I are pretty good friends now. His video is in my view the best ski instruction video out there. Being an older dude, and starting skiing in Feb08, i have seen most of them: Lito Flores(his book is way better, video I thought was not that good), Rick S on this forum, Harb(found his videos actually could use a ton more improvement), GoSki(warren smith, some of the short clips are pretty useful) etc, Rick's is the most detailed but its a 4 dvd sequence. I found Klaus's video the best overall hands down for beginners and intermediates, no question. The Bode Miller collection, I also like a lot, there is something very realistic about the way Bode skis when he is not blasting, like he understands what the non-Bode's are going through. Then again KM's video is far more systematic and his simple exercises (he makes them look a lot simpler than they are!) are the best I have found to get the sensations and position you are trying to achieve. I mean the most basic body position, the way he shows it so often, never seen anything like it anywhere else.

SimplyFast: What did you mean by "he shows PROGRESSION" and do they teach "PROGRESSION" in the US? I being a "Student" did not understand, perhaps you can clarify?
Edited by dustyfog - 3/5/10 at 10:00pm
post #48 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by dustyfog View Post

 I mean he is the one guy who on tape talks about killing speed at the TOP of a turn, most others in books (like the DesLaurier book or Lito Flores) effectively talk about killing speed at the bottom of the turn, which may be great for the experts but killing at the top, smearing the turn etc is so much better but not the easiest thing to do though.

DesLaurier’s method works for me. Their method requires a lot of balance if you look at the 3 drills mentioned in the book.  It works well for steep but also for many conditions one will encounter on steep off-piste.  I am familiar with killing speed on top of the turn because it is common in snowboarding.  I am unable to use this method when I ski in crud snow when my ski is buried under snow because my speed is not fast enough. My ski will come off if I tried to steer or skid. DesLaurier’s method emphasizes carving and let skis do the work so it works quite well in this situation.  I spend a lot of time on the drills to the point I want to give up but I got it suddenly one day.  I find it help my skiing everywhere after that.  Any difficult situation I encounter now is more of a mental challenge. I started ski last year so my experience is similar to yours. 
post #49 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by dustyfog View Post

SimplyFast - having actually skiied with Klaus and instructors here on the United States east coast Chuck Seymour, and at Alta, Tom Cadura. I would say all are great instructors. It was at different stages in my evolution as a skier and am still evolving. I learnt the most basic stuff about skiing from Chuck, then with Klaus I learnt about how to get down big mountain steeps calmly and all about believing and letting gravity do its thing, and he taught my son a ton of basics and the beginning of serious carving (my boy had just turned 6 in that month), and finally with Tom C at Alta - I learnt the key issues related to skiing a ton of snow, with very little or no grooming and real powder (some of it). I would say all were great, different age groups in terms of their vintage, Klaus is mid-30s, Chuck is almost 60, and Tom is early 40's. I have "progressed" for sure...

see this thread on my comment on comparing the methods briefly for beginners Europeans vs Americans: just one guy's personal perspective.
http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/91869/how-to-do-the-non-carving-parallel-turn#post_1192422

Tom C at Alta was the one who finally helped correct that fact that I could barely get on inside edges (seriously bow-legged, with Klaus i did a few airborne in-air 360's on flattish slopes and he noticed I was on my outside edges !!!) etc, and the work with bootfitters thereafter has made an immeasurable difference and the boots are not fixed yet but the change is incredible.  Also, he introduced me to Dynastar Sultan Legend 85's - what skis, I use them in NEast hardpack and they are good for me in Alta. His point was my skiing had improved beyond the short carvers I was used to and needed a pretty stiff pile-driver, and man, does that ski blast through stuff, love it. You should have seen the incredible bend/contortions/angulations I had to execute to get a major edge angle out of my skis...just tipping was doing diddly squat until the boot-fixes occurred, no wonder I struggled often. I could not skate, and my little boy would give me lessons on it, all much improved now.

So in summary, instructors on both continents have been great. Klaus and I are pretty good friends now. His video is in my view the best ski instruction video out there. Being an older dude, and starting skiing in Feb08, i have seen most of them: Lito Flores(his book is way better, video I thought was not that good), Rick S on this forum, Harb(found his videos actually could use a ton more improvement), GoSki(warren smith, some of the short clips are pretty useful) etc, Rick's is the most detailed but its a 4 dvd sequence. I found Klaus's video the best overall hands down for beginners and intermediates, no question. The Bode Miller collection, I also like a lot, there is something very realistic about the way Bode skis when he is not blasting, like he understands what the non-Bode's are going through. Then again KM's video is far more systematic and his simple exercises (he makes them look a lot simpler than they are!) are the best I have found to get the sensations and position you are trying to achieve. I mean the most basic body position, the way he shows it so often, never seen anything like it anywhere else.

SimplyFast: What did you mean by "he shows PROGRESSION" and do they teach "PROGRESSION" in the US? I being a "Student" did not understand, perhaps you can clarify?
 
I do like the things Klaus shows on the videos and I like his progressions. Thank you for the explaination about all the differences.
Well progressions are simply drills and tasks that step by step show the links and completion of an entire range of motion and how to achieve them.

Do they still follow that in the US or do they just randomly go through one drill after the other and one theory to the next?
post #50 of 53
It all depends on the ski school i would think. On the small mountain where my boy learnt to ski here in upstate new york, the instructors were terrific, all the way from the time he was 3 1/2 years old to about 5+ when he outgrew the school and they were the first to tell me about it. Sensibly systematic and free-wheeling too, my son loved it from the day he put on skis on a slope outside our upstate home and the school fostered it.

I cannot opine on all schools but generally they are pretty sensible I would think. Question is more that since most people go for perhaps one ski vacation per year, for any prolonged period, how many put themselves or their kids in a ski school on a sustained basis for someone to learn systematically. Instructors can show students the drills, but they need time on skis to practise them. And in the US, ski instruction is rather expensive whichever way one slices it relative to Europe, again I will only observe on Austria about which I have first-hand knowledge. Austrian ski school costs are about a third or less of US ski school costs. So these are also factors.

For example Rick S - for yourskicoach.com writes extensively on this forum. Now his instruction DVD set is a 4 DVD + series, and that is painstaking detailed "progression" as per your definition above. It takes a lot though to go through those steps on a regular basis. Folks just do not have the time or in many cases the resources or access to a ski slope to diligently practise the drills. That said, my experience is that many ski instructors in the US love their sport and are enthusiastic, and actually "caring" teachers, i.e. they care that the student advances. Since here in the US ski instruction almost never generates enough income to support a family, these folks do it for the love of their sport and most have other careers too.
post #51 of 53
hellside: you started skiing in 2009 and joined the forum in 2007 ! so you loved skiing from afar!
post #52 of 53
I know how to ride snowboard before skiing.
post #53 of 53
ok, i got it, how do you feel about the differences, and what do you think as you practise klaus' moves?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching