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Lanzinger - Page 3

post #61 of 75
Indeed.

If *you* were racing a downhill course, would you feel better if there was a medivac helicopter on standby, as opposed to an ambulance with a 45 minute road trip to the nearest hospital?
post #62 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
... I just watched the women's World Cup DH from Switzerland. Anja Paerson finished the race, and removed her ski by TWISTING! I got it on tape, had to replay it to believe it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
Can you spell Q-U-A-D-S?

Them girls are strong.
Nah, just really small feet
post #63 of 75
A week and a half later and I am still shocked by this accident. Truly horrible. I wonder all the time about binding technology and how it could be improved since it is rare to see a racer make it to the World Cup level without a road map of surgical scars marking their knees.

I thought about remote release via a coach or other third party but as a couple people mentioned, the coach has to be able to see the racer in plain view (even the tv cameras on World Cup courses don't cover all the angles sufficiently), and the speeds are so great that no human has the necessary reflexes to act fast enough, even in optimum conditions, to prevent every serious injury. (And let's not forget that just as many injuries happen while training and free skiing away from watchful eyes as during televised races).

No, the answer has to be the binding itself, or perhaps more accurately, the ski-to-human interface. Skiing is fascinating because it may be the ultimate futuristic bond between man and machine; through the skis, boots and bindings a skier wears, a skier becomes an incredibly agile, maneuverable, high speed machine, and also the pilot of that machine all rolled into one. So perhaps the best approach would be to not have the human and the mechanical elements of that machine as two separate parts as they currently are, but somehow more integrated.

High tech examples may be to have electronic sensors attached to the leg and knee somehow that trigger a binding release when a threshold of forces are reached, or to have an integrated exo-skeleton structure that the skier wears from the hip down that is able to sense dangerous forces and torque and trigger a binding release. These are just my hypotheses, I am no binding expert and have no clue where binding design is going in the future.

But more reliable bindings or not, skiing is a fast, dangerous sport filled with any number of ways to injure or kill a skier. The good news is injuries like Lanzinger's are very, very rare.
post #64 of 75
Any news on Lanzinger?
post #65 of 75
He won't be allowed to compete as a sprinter in the summer Olympics...
post #66 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
He won't be allowed to compete as a sprinter in the summer Olympics...
what?
post #67 of 75
Look at this thread... it will help you understand my 'odd sense of humor':

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=65005
post #68 of 75
That video makes me sick to my stomach.

I hope that guy makes a decent recovery. Good vibes out to him and his family.
post #69 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
Look at this thread... it will help you understand my 'odd sense of humor':

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=65005
I see.. However, does anyone have a serious response to my question?
post #70 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
He won't be allowed to compete as a sprinter in the summer Olympics...
I LOLed. I feel dirty.
post #71 of 75
I read a week or so ago, that he was promised a media job.

Additionally ..... Wikipedia .... for what that's worth .... : .... indicates that the additional damage was caused because the leg was broken and hence did not provide the resistance needed for the binding to release.

Considering the source ..... (Wiki) .... and where they got the information is of course suspect .... but in some ways, it may make some sense.

It does appear that he may have landed hard in downward compression on the left leg. Possible????
post #72 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
I read a week or so ago, that he was promised a media job.

Additionally ..... Wikipedia .... for what that's worth .... : .... indicates that the additional damage was caused because the leg was broken and hence did not provide the resistance needed for the binding to release.

Considering the source ..... (Wiki) .... and where they got the information is of course suspect .... but in some ways, it may make some sense.

It does appear that he may have landed hard in downward compression on the left leg. Possible????
I was thinking that from the beginning and I think there was a post here somewhere stating that if the leg could break without the binding releasing. How much pressure would it apply to release even with the leg broken?..
post #73 of 75
I am playing "Devils Advocate" and the actual facts may never be known, please take that into consideration.

Even "slow motion" photography can give a false impression and I'm sure we have watched that series of impacts trying to make sense of when the binding could/should have released.

This week they had an illustration regarding slow motion ..... they pop a baloon with a pin under slow motion ..... the pattern of "shards" of yellow latex seemed quite apparent and the direction they flew in the "explosion", seemed plain as day.

They then showed the same baloon with a camera that had greater speed (number of frames) .... and what was shocking was that you were tricked. There were actually two baloons (one blown up inside the other) and you realized that you missed so much .... clear as a bell ... one pops and stuff flys and then the other follows ..... but under conventional slow motion ..... your perception was that of a single "incident" or explosion.

When you look at how hard he initially lands on his left leg, could that impact, as "routine" as it seems, have caused an initial fracture that then negated the DIN and release at "conventional angles of release" .... ?

If he landed relatively ..... flat and hard .... in that initial impact, the best thing I can think of it's like jumping off a lift and hitting flat .... your binding is not set to release under that condition.

If his bone was fractured as a result of the initial impact ... and the DIN is set regarding the bone and point of release, all bets were off regarding any settings ... the damaged tissue and bone would not provide the resistance for the binding to release.
post #74 of 75
Lanzinger gave a mini-press conference in the second week of March.

++++++++++

Matthias Lanzinger made his first public comments Thursday following a horror crash in a downhill World Cup race earlier this month that resulted in the amputation of his lower left leg. "I just have to be happy that I'm even here at all," said Lanzinger in Salzburg. "I have accepted my destiny and will get through this together with my family."

The 27-year-old, who made his appearance in a wheelchair, added that while it was too late for him he hoped that answers would be found as to how the terrible accident happened.

"It won't help me any more but it might help others," he said.
"I'm getting an awful lot of medical support. That makes things a lot easier," he said.

Asked about the hours and days following his crash, Lanzinger said "the days and nights in Norway lasted for ever. The intensive care ward was particularly hard. I had a lot of pain and was only semi-conscious," he said.

Lanzinger was placed in an artificial coma to help treat his injuries but developed serious vascular problems as doctors struggled to re-establish blood circulation to his left foot and ankle.


post #75 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
I LOLed.
Wouldn't it technically be "L'ed OL?"

Who's the hottie pushing the wheelchair?
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