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skid before carving

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hi folks,
I noticed that when I initiate turns the ski will skid before carving. When I slow the edge engagement I have trouble controlling speed, I'm just riding the ski wherever it wants to go. Is there a simple way to describe what I’m doing wrong? Sorry, no video, all thoughts appreciated.
Thanks
Ryel

FWIW
56 yr old, 5’ 11, 185 lbs
172 Dynaster contact limited. Look demo, Nordica boots
post #2 of 12
Ryel,

It is possible to initiate turns without skidding. If you do this, you will only control speed through turn shape. There are many possible reasons why one would be skidding during turn initiation. One common reason is weight that is centered too far back.
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
thanks, I will work on that
post #4 of 12
Another producer of skidding in hurrying the start of the turn to get the skis pointed the other direction as quickly as possible.
post #5 of 12
Use the skis as the steering wheel, not as the brakes. Start by thinking about turn shape, more of it. When you make your edge change, try and do it without twisting the skis into the new turn. As an exercise, try a really slow edge change, have a slight pause where the skis are flat, see if you can continue in the direction the skis are pointed. Keep moving your CM across the skis to get on your new edges and let the tips of those Dynastars pull you into the new turn.
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post
Another producer of skidding in hurrying the start of the turn to get the skis pointed the other direction as quickly as possible.
I do hurry the turn, especially as it gets steep. I will go to a slower slope and work on init in small steps.
post #7 of 12
That would be a good start. Learn to get the skis on edge at the beginning of the turn and have patience as your speed increases while you're pointing 'em downhill with the knowledge that as you continue to turn toward the end, you can use turn shape to adjust speed. Take the same patience to gradually steeper terrain.
post #8 of 12
Another option to add to your quiver would be to flatten the skis and purposely not allow them to pivot. Learning to not pivot a flat ski is still working on your turning skills. Much like learning that getting the skis flat in the first place is a tipping skill. It's all part of exploring the complete range of motion verses always going for more. Sometimes we need to explore the less is more concept.
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post
Another option to add to your quiver would be to flatten the skis and purposely not allow them to pivot. Learning to not pivot a flat ski is still working on your turning skills. Much like learning that getting the skis flat in the first place is a tipping skill. It's all part of exploring the complete range of motion verses always going for more. Sometimes we need to explore the less is more concept.
I'm having trouble wrapping my mind around that one. it may take me a while to get there. but thanks for throwing it out there.
post #10 of 12
Ryel, if you try traversing on a really gradual slope and just flatten the skis while keeping your weight equal on them, they gradually will turn toward the fall line. I think that's what JASP is describing. Using that process to get used to having patience at the start of the turn would be the goal. As the skis reach the fall line, engage edges to complete a turn.
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
that makes sense, thanks
post #12 of 12
Hi All,

Maybe Ryel doesn’t want to go that fast in the steeps. A black groomed run can produce a progressive increase in speed if one hooks the skis up at the top of the turn and continues to do so down the hill. If you want to control the speed on a run like this then some smearing and steering will be required. Depending on the turn shape and turn radius you are trying to achieve, where to apply more edge angle will be different. A medium radius turn might require a smeared turn throughout the whole turn to control speed. In a larger turn the skier might want to apply more edge through the bottom of the turn to climb back up the hill to control speed. Of course if the skier wants to take a real ride he or she can hook them up at the top of the turn and go for it. This is an approach I would suggest on a moderate blue run where the skier can find a steady speed through turn shape and not have to bleed off excess speed because of the terrain being steep. So IMHO, it’s not how much edge you are trying to get, but how to manage edge angles and what you are trying to accomplish.--------Wigs
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