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Tactics for LuMPy TraVErsEs?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Narrow ones, fast ones, say 1/2 or 3/4 ski length wide.

Best tactics for speed control?
post #2 of 13
Horizontal sideslip. Plus you gotta learn to slide above the big bumps and drift back down to the traverse. It's also useful to know when to air over the bigger bumps....
post #3 of 13
Actually, I consider a 'narrow" traverse to be one that is no more than two ski width...and a truly narrow one is one that is only one.

If you have 1/2 ski width, you can pull your tips 30 degrees above the traverse line, but continue forward, essentially slipping the front portion of your skis.
post #4 of 13
Harry,

FWIW, he's talking ski LENGTH not WIDTH (BIG difference ).
post #5 of 13
In my experience, by the time traverses develop really nasty lumps they usually start to develop alternate paths. When a forest traverse has a fork to both sides of a tree, oftentimes one is a nasty whoop-de-whoop (or "compression" if you want to be dignified) and the other is hook around it. Even if there is no other path, the edges of the dip are usually less deep than the center.

As for handling the obstacle itself, I try to do my speed control before or after and be as loose as possible during the thing itself.
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonnie View Post
Harry,

FWIW, he's talking ski LENGTH not WIDTH (BIG difference ).
I fully comprehend that, hence why I expressed my opinion that a "narrow" traverse was measured in width of skis...a traverse that is 3/4 ski length wide is not what I consider a "narrow" traverse.
post #7 of 13
Follow the snowboarders, they don't put up with the lumps, they make another traverse.
post #8 of 13
Those big whoop T doos are easier to handle if you push your feet and tips into them and ahead, then pull your feet back as you crest and compress. Its best shown by an animation Bob Barnes has posted many times.



Charlie McArthur worked with us on this at the Aspen ESA and it is applicable in many places...traverses, steeps and moguls in general. It works to control speed and ease the shock of the bumps. Adding a progressive side slip as needed for speed control is a good strategy as well. If you can ever get to where you actually feel this circular motion, it can really turn on a light.
post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
Cirq, i've sort of been trying to combine that reverse cycling with Ott's wedeln move.
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Cirq, i've sort of been trying to combine that reverse cycling with Ott's wedeln move.
No link?
post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 
post #12 of 13
I have learned doubling stuff like this is the best option, speed control, not something that is very desiable on a traverse. usually trying to maintain speed as much as possiable.

I am being serious though doubling these bumps like a BMX rider is the best option alot of times to save your knees.
post #13 of 13
The problem (for me at least) is that I am not brave enough to take traverses through the woods at speed my first time through. And usually not my second either. By the third I start to get comfortable.

I do vividly remember folllowing an instructor at Jackson Hole (a group -- actually camp -- lesson) on what she called the "James Bond traverse" and desparately trying to keep up. We came around a corner and there was a wrist-thick branch across the trail four feet off the ground.: a) Think fast! and b) Duck!
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