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Boots good one day bad the next..what gives?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I have had this phenomena occur with nearly all my boots. One day I will ski and my boots feel like a second skin, all is wonderful. The next time it will feel like a medieval torture device. This will occur with the same socks and the same skis.

Here are my best guesses:
  • Water retention, the amount of water our bodies retain varies greatly day to day, as a result if you have snug boots or improperly fit boots problems may arise.
  • Snow conditions, different snow calls for different techniques, I like firm snow, this weekend I skied mashed potatoes and powder, I struggled, used bad form, and my feet were killing me.
  • Type of skiing, when cruising nice and easy, even lousy fitting boots feel okay, but once I push its all over. This seems to happen to me even when the boots usually feel great.
  • Foot size; I guess you can fluctuate your weight enough that this may cause a fitment problem as well.
  • Swollen feet due to altitude or barometric pressure?
  • Temperature?
  • How much you walked that week?
I would like to hear your ideas and or suggestions, because I seem to be the only one to have never ending boot issues out of all of my group.
post #2 of 19
Boots too big, curling toes for extra purchase insta-reaction when going gets tough?
post #3 of 19
Get your wife/girlfriend to put an L on the left one and an R on the right one.
post #4 of 19
Put the left liner in the left boot and the right liner in the right boot.

Make sure your micro-adjustable buckles haven't rotated 360 degrees.

Boots too big, and feet already sensitive from being bashed around yesterday.
post #5 of 19
I remove my liners and footbeds after each day to let them dry.

When I put my footbeds back in, if I don't reset the outside of my bed (sixth toe area) inside my liner to lower my arch, my foot hurts like hell on the top.

For me, the footbed placement will ruin my day until I reset it. And the pain is not under my foot, which resulted in a lot of time trying to figure out the same issue as yourself. My problem was; "why does the top of my foot hurt some days but not others?"
post #6 of 19
they def get stiffer as temp drops towards zero
post #7 of 19
I'm assuming you always always always use the same (type of) socks, right? I'd also suggest using the exact same buckling regimen every time out. I used to ski the first run of every day with my buckles undone, to let the blood circulate a bit in my feet (don't do this now that I have found the world'sbestperfectboots). I know a lot of guys who have elaborate unbuckle/rebuckle routines, which need to be adjusted according to how cold/warm it is. The same would be true of buckle settings (except with world'sbestperfectboots, which are always cozy/tight), maybe need to crank more when warm, back off when cold. I'd be hopeful. If your boots don't hurt all the time, you may be on to something. Keep tinkering.
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
Get your wife/girlfriend to put an L on the left one and an R on the right one.
Thats fine until your name is Randy Logan.


My simple rule is...buckles on the outside.


If I have any problems with my boots, it is usually that the buckles are the wrong tension and not tight enough.
post #9 of 19
R-R, I think you have good list of possible factors. How about the fit of the boot changing? I know that new boots take at least 15-20 days on the slopes before settling into a groove for me. And if I tweak them (say new footbeds) it will be at least another 5-10 days before they settle back in. Break-in and pack-out is something you won't be able to avoid.

Now, if the boots are good one day, bad the next, then good, then bad, etc... then it's either a poor fit that only makes itself apparent in certain situations, or maybe your feet are shrinking/swelling for some reason. I haven't experienced a cyclical boot fit issue (thankfully) so it's hard for me to say.
post #10 of 19
I agree with the possibility of toe clenching. As you describe it, the pain comes when you're not in your comfort zone and are focusing hard on making your turns work well in unfamiliar environments. For me, that's when the toes begin to clench. The boots may fit fine, but the toes still do their thing. I have had some success with just thinking about relaxing them when I get into those situations. It's not perfect, but it helps.
post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post
I agree with the possibility of toe clenching. As you describe it, the pain comes when you're not in your comfort zone and are focusing hard on making your turns work well in unfamiliar environments. For me, that's when the toes begin to clench. The boots may fit fine, but the toes still do their thing. I have had some success with just thinking about relaxing them when I get into those situations. It's not perfect, but it helps.
I never considered the toe clenching, you may be on to something.
post #12 of 19
Was there any difference in temps between the two days?
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Yes, much warmer on the painful day.
post #14 of 19
that will make a difference . I have to run and go skiing right now but others will be able to explain.
post #15 of 19

I hear hoofbeats in the dark, what colour the equine?

Horse and mule guesses:

Boots too big: toes clench for grip as I described above

Boots too big/wrong angles: more forward & back motion for balance on warmer snow -> more banging about inside boot

Boots too big/wrong shape: Bigger moves used for steering, tipping, turn release on warmer snow -> more banging about inside boot.

Boots too big/wrong shape: On second day the feet are still swollen from the banging about on the first day.

Boots too big/wrong shape: Intentional buckling for control makes pressure points, clamps arch down, restricts range of motion, restricts circulation

...

I have zebra, quagga, and unicorn guesses too , but more information than 'medieval torture device' might help save time?
post #16 of 19
I have experienced same issue a few times over the last couple of years. It finally occured to me (I'm not very bright eh), that on the good days when the boots feel great in the am, I still have to tighten top three buckles 1 full turn in the afternoon and everything is great for the rest of the day. The last time it happened, I finally realized that I sometimes forget to reset the buckles to morning setting from the previous day, therefore the boots are too tight to start the day. Although it's ony 1 turn, It usually gets painful by the second or third run at which time I'm kicking myself that I didn't realize sooner.

I think age also plays a factor (LOL) !!
post #17 of 19
RMP I'm guessing that you don't walk in the boots very much, from locker to snow?
post #18 of 19
Comprex:

Actually I usually do walk a fair bit. I just used to get really stoked for the first run of the day and would forget to actually think about how the boots felt. I pay more attention now because, although 1 turn either way may seem inconsequential to some, it makes all the difference in the world to me.

Take care.
RMP
post #19 of 19
I had this situation in my old boots. It was almost always tongue placement. If I had the tongue 1/2" to the outside it would cause me quite a lot of pain. Then I would unbuckle, move tongue to the inside and redo buckle regimen; second from top first, then top, then power strap then second from bottom then the bottom one.

If that didn't cure the problem micro-adjustments did.
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