New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Dedicating to SL? - Page 2

post #31 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublediamond223 View Post
Not sure if you are looking for MA, but you REALLY need to stop trying so hard to crossblock. You did not need to about 70% of the time that you did, and ended up reaching all the way across your body, causing your tails to wash out. An inside arm clear works just as well. Spend some time in brushes or stubbies to rid yourself of this problem and work on the turns.
X 2

Cross blocking is both good and bad. If your close enough to the gate. Use your inside pole to block. But, if you cross block to an extreme. It throws your upper body out of alignment which takes your lower body with it. Which in turn takes your skis. Now you really have to work harder to make the next turn stick. This = a loss of time. I also kind of noticed that you like to be in the back seat a little. This is what I tell people. Practice skiing really slow. Try lifting your toes against the top of your boots. Try practicing really small radius turns slow on a steeper pitch. The drill I am thinking of is kind of hard to explain over the interweb. Ill look for a video on youtube or something.

Good luck and enjoy it. I wish I would have taken skiing more serious when I was your age.
post #32 of 45
Thread Starter 
My friend just sent me a frame from a while back... not sl though.

post #33 of 45
After reading many responses, I have few thoughts. 1) Find a very good coach and listen. Do not worry about points, as a first year J2, you have lots of catching up to do. You might have to wait a few more years to get lower points. 2) Attend a ski team summer camp, do not go to a "for profit" summer camp. 3) A good coach can work with you on equipment. 4) Lastly, get ready for drills, working on fundamentals. Ask questions, start summer dry-land training, and work hard. Work ethic goes a long way.

Its been my experience that the good teams in the western USA, most if not all J2 skiers run all disciplines. I suspect if you can not ski GS that well, it does not lead me to think that you will be successful w/ SL. Good luck. cmr
post #34 of 45
I think it might help to read the following stories posted in the "Racing Style/All-Mountain Style -how to work on both?" thread.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posted by Bob Barnes:
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=69848

Quote:
(note this story is about the US ski team racers practicing at Killington before the 1980 Lake Placid Olympics. They had to go through moguls before getting to the course for training.)

while some of the US ski teamers were able to ski the bumps pretty well, some of them kinda flailed. the *most* interesting skiers to watch were the Mahre brothers.... who had such a nice touch... made it look super easy, skiing icy "VW Bug" sized bumps... while holding 2 pair of skis (one on each shoulder) . they were so fluid and smooth, you would have thought that they *always* ski bumps like that... hehehe!!! -Chili
Very much related, Chili! I had the privilege of working with Phil & Steve Mahre for 15 years or so at the Mahre Training Center at Keystone (now at Deer Valley). I can vouch for their bump skiing ability, even though bumps weren't their first choice of terrain. They were awesome bump skiers. I also recall a time about ten years ago, when Keystone put in one the first terrain parks with a "hit line" that ended with an enormous jump with a huge kicker. The Mahres and the MTC coaches were just out skiing, and we came into the park. There were snowboarders and a handful of skiers sitting on the snow above the big jump, watching the brave few who were actually attempting it. All of a sudden, Phil came from way above them all, gathered a good bit of speed, slalomed through the spectators, and hit the jump fast, launching sky-high and throwing a perfect, very slow rotating 360, before disappearing over the horizon to the landing. The crowd cheered with awe--he'd gone way huger than any of the other budding new-schoolers out there. Of course, they had no idea who it was that had just impressed them so.

In 1988, I was skiing in the Arlberg region of Austria, home of the famed Kandahar World Cup races. It was four years since the Mahres had retired from the World Cup after their Gold and Silver medals in the Sarajevo Olympic Slalom, and yet the Austrians still revered them as super heroes. They were somewhat less enamored of the rest of the US Ski Team, who they said lacked versatility, because they only skied gates. What impressed them most about the Mahre brothers was that they SKIED--whenever and whereever they could, in any weather, in any conditions. They described a World Cup race one season when a blizzard conflicted with some of the training days. The rest of the US team, they said, stayed in their hotel rooms and complained about the "lousy conditions," while Phil and Steve went out and skied the powder, and the crud, and the steeps....

What many American racers seem not to realize is that race courses have varied conditions, so you cannot expect to win many races if all you do is train gates on groomed runs on sunny days. Phil and Steve themselves were critical of typical American race programs, which seemed to spend more energy working on cross-blocking techniques than on learning how to make a good turn. (bold added)

Anyway, these stories certainly bring some reality to the ideas we've described here, that racing and free-skiing are the same, and that you can't get really, truly good at one without getting good at the other.

Best regards,
Bob
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This is Anja Paerson at Aare 2006 slalom, 2nd run.
Image reference: http://www.ronlemaster.com/images/20...2006-sl-2.html

Note there's not much "cross" in her "cross blocking". She does concentrate on where she's turning.
525x525px-LL-vbattach3273.jpg
post #35 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
I think it might help to read the following stories posted in the "Racing Style/All-Mountain Style -how to work on both?" thread.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posted by Bob Barnes:
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=69848

Very much related, Chili! I had the privilege of working with Phil & Steve Mahre for 15 years or so at the Mahre Training Center at Keystone (now at Deer Valley). I can vouch for their bump skiing ability, even though bumps weren't their first choice of terrain. They were awesome bump skiers. I also recall a time about ten years ago, when Keystone put in one the first terrain parks with a "hit line" that ended with an enormous jump with a huge kicker. The Mahres and the MTC coaches were just out skiing, and we came into the park. There were snowboarders and a handful of skiers sitting on the snow above the big jump, watching the brave few who were actually attempting it. All of a sudden, Phil came from way above them all, gathered a good bit of speed, slalomed through the spectators, and hit the jump fast, launching sky-high and throwing a perfect, very slow rotating 360, before disappearing over the horizon to the landing. The crowd cheered with awe--he'd gone way huger than any of the other budding new-schoolers out there. Of course, they had no idea who it was that had just impressed them so.

In 1988, I was skiing in the Arlberg region of Austria, home of the famed Kandahar World Cup races. It was four years since the Mahres had retired from the World Cup after their Gold and Silver medals in the Sarajevo Olympic Slalom, and yet the Austrians still revered them as super heroes. They were somewhat less enamored of the rest of the US Ski Team, who they said lacked versatility, because they only skied gates. What impressed them most about the Mahre brothers was that they SKIED--whenever and whereever they could, in any weather, in any conditions. They described a World Cup race one season when a blizzard conflicted with some of the training days. The rest of the US team, they said, stayed in their hotel rooms and complained about the "lousy conditions," while Phil and Steve went out and skied the powder, and the crud, and the steeps....

What many American racers seem not to realize is that race courses have varied conditions, so you cannot expect to win many races if all you do is train gates on groomed runs on sunny days. Phil and Steve themselves were critical of typical American race programs, which seemed to spend more energy working on cross-blocking techniques than on learning how to make a good turn. (bold added)

Anyway, these stories certainly bring some reality to the ideas we've described here, that racing and free-skiing are the same, and that you can't get really, truly good at one without getting good at the other.

Best regards,
Bob
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This is Anja Paerson at Aare 2006 slalom, 2nd run.
Image reference: http://www.ronlemaster.com/images/20...2006-sl-2.html

Note there's not much "cross" in her "cross blocking". She does concentrate on where she's turning.

I liked that last one.
post #36 of 45
The Mahre's comments on the United States race programs is not completely true. Most good ski team at ages J5-J4 just concentrate on directed free skiing and drills. At J3 level, a split between directly free skiing, drills and gates. J1-J2, more of an emphasis on gates with drills and about 20% free skiing. I've watched racers train on bumps, so they can control their landing, get used to the terrain that may or may not mimic a race course. The best alpine racers and ski teams are the individuals/teams that are training (free-skiing, drills, gates, etc.) in all snow and weather conditions. cmr
post #37 of 45
what Phil has commented to me was that kids are specializing in a particular sport too early. He would like to see them play different sports during the year instead of skiing 300 days a year maybe up through J1.

His comment was that some of the other sports provide svaluable kills that cross over and that there is less chance they burn out early!
post #38 of 45
That's a tough one these days as most sports want kids to do them almost year round. Completely ridiculous but that's the trend. For skiing, I know it's tough that a lot of kids want to play hockey at school, but even doing weekend ski racing can conflict. From what I've seen, neither coach likes kids to try to do both, and sometimes it's impossible with time. Miss practice to ski, no game etc.
There also sometimes unwilling to see the crossover value in it.
Burn out - yeah that's a big one.

charlier,
Agree that in good programs those ideas are followed. Still, the obsession with gates at young ages, or J5,6 racing on too steep terrain etc. happens.
post #39 of 45
Tog makes a good point, many coaches concentrate on running gates - in particular at young ages. Last year my daughter was a J2, competing at a FIS level. The summer and fall training schedule was huge, let alone the winter racing traveling. She loved ski racing, but decided it took way too much time, considering how much school she was missing during the academic year. Burn-out is a big issue. charlier
post #40 of 45
I have a nephew who raced J2 last year. So much time it's true. If his school didn't have a program then I don't know how you'd do it. Even then, you have races over vacations that you have to get to.
post #41 of 45
We are off topic, but... My daughters school did not accomodate her very well. A FIS typical race, say traveling to Sugar Bowl or Jackson Hole takes one day on either side for air travel. Then perhaps 4 days of racing/training, including SG, SL and GS. Regional coaches costs, room/board, registration, and a week of missed school - twice a month in the winter. And, upon her return, her teachers ask, "how was your ski vacation". It was year round, except just two month, september and october. charlier
post #42 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlier View Post
We are off topic, but... My daughters school did not accomodate her very well. A FIS typical race, say traveling to Sugar Bowl or Jackson Hole takes one day on either side for air travel. Then perhaps 4 days of racing/training, including SG, SL and GS. Regional coaches costs, room/board, registration, and a week of missed school - twice a month in the winter. And, upon her return, her teachers ask, "how was your ski vacation". It was year round, except just two month, september and october. charlier
When my boys were racing at that level, I wrote a letter to the school principal at the beginning of the year outling their race accomplishments, their schedule for the season and met with thier counselors with professional photos taken at races. this put ski racing in an entirely different light.

My older son also pitched in high School and most of the important races and training conflicted with baseball. Being a pitche, the baseball coaches accomodated his absences. And fit his rotation around his race schedule!
post #43 of 45

Kids

Sorry we are so off topic but I just ran into this thread! I have kids that are very committed to skiing and I am concerned about them burning out! We normally ski every week once and every weekend as a family! They now race and it is going to be an issue at school. How do I do this without burning the kids out? I know the school was less than enthusiastic about giving our kids assignments in advance last year when we would leave for Colorado and Montana etc.

Thanks
Matt
post #44 of 45
My younger daughter did burn out. She also was more interested in what her friends were doing in school. My older daughter stopped racing, since she was not interested in racing unless she could give it 100%. This was going to a full-time program - perhaps moving away from home. Now is is coaching skiing (she is 17 yrs old) and loves it. As she tells me - I get paid to ski, get a season pass, and great deals on skis and clothing. My only advice is make sure its about what your kids want to do versus what you want them to do. Does this make sense? Charlie
post #45 of 45
Our race team has an arrangement with the schools to let the kids out early some days for training and to accommodate their racing. The kids basically have to maintain a certain grade level, keep up, etc., but they are allowed to miss a lot of school if they can do it. The argument was made that the same level of support was provided to the track, basketball, football, etc. teams and that this sport was the equivalent to those even though it wasn't a "school sport". One of the female skiers set a new school record of missed days (like 42 or something in one semester) racing FIS. She still had a 4.0.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home