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Male Instructors, Cute Guys, Beware!

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Stalker Alert!

[ January 04, 2004, 08:35 PM: Message edited by: Lisamarie ]
post #2 of 20
Good ole Boston.com! Where else could you expect to see "adorable ski instructor" and "Killington" in the same sentence?
Thank you, LM, for once again keeping everyone up-to-date on the latest serious skiing-related news.
post #3 of 20
Yes

The Snowsports Skimail newletters always have very useful information.

Like the current conditions at McIntyre in NH on the mainpage.

They have a huge 160 foot vertical.

post #4 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by David7:
Good ole Boston.com! Where else could you expect to see "adorable ski instructor" and "Killington" in the same sentence?
Thank you, LM, for once again keeping everyone up-to-date on the latest serious skiing-related news.
HAHA!! I LOVE IT!!
post #5 of 20
Quote:
Originally posted by Lisamarie:
Stalker Alert!
Boston has lost it.
post #6 of 20
Scalce, on that "huge" 160 vetical the McIntyre Ski and Snowboard School teaches over 4,500 lessons a week. Information on the conditions happens to be useful to quite a few folks.

How many lessons does Killington do in a week?

[ January 05, 2004, 12:37 PM: Message edited by: David7 ]
post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 
Anyone recognize themselves? [img]tongue.gif[/img]
http://www.boston.com/travel/seasona...secondchances/
post #8 of 20
Aw Shucks Maam............!!!!!!!! [img]redface.gif[/img]
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally posted by David7:
Scalce, on that "huge" 160 vetical the McIntyre Ski and Snowboard School teaches over 4,500 lessons a week. Information on the conditions happens to be useful to quite a few folks.

How many lessons does Killington do in a week?
Time for a beginner survey: "would you be intimidated by lessons on a big mountain?"
post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally posted by David7:
Scalce, on that "huge" 160 vetical the McIntyre Ski and Snowboard School teaches over 4,500 lessons a week. Information on the conditions happens to be useful to quite a few folks.

How many lessons does Killington do in a week?
Where did you pull that 4500 from?

O wait, I know where you pulled it from.

Sorry but most people who subscrie to a ski newsletter probably don't want to know the weather at a hill.

If they do have that many lessons , which I highly doubt, it would be a dangerous place to take a baby in a backpack so some people may not go.
post #11 of 20
Scalce, stop by at McIntyre some weekday after school this month, at about 3:30, or on a Saturday or Sunday morning at 9:30, then come back and tell us you still doubt the numbers.

I'm not quite sure what you mean by the comment "...I know where you pulled it from" but that doesn't matter. Most people who know only the resort areas have no concept of what goes on at the small local areas that do high volume after school programs. Pats Peak has over 10,000 kids a week, and I think Nashoba Valley has volume like that too. I understand that the midwest areas, also a short school bus ride from major populations, are much the same

Naturally more than 90% of the ski school business at these areas is children, and a large percentage of the instructors are high school or college age. They do very little marketing other than word of mouth. The word of mouth is overwhelmingly positive and the school programs continue to grow every year. These types of ski schools know things about scheduling, staffing, crowd control and making lessons fun that the big resorts with the prestigious ski schools haven't got a clue about.

But are they good places to learn to ski? Comprex asked an interesting question. Are some potential beginners intimidated by big mountains? Is a big mountain resort, with it's high prices for everything, necessary if you're a beginner?

Does it matter that the big resort ski school has 25 level 3 certified instructors if they all consider themselves too good to teach beginners? Does it matter that the area has 2,100 feet of vertical if you're only going to use a couple hundred feet of vertical at the bottom?

Sure it's a lot better to look out across the valley and see Mount Washington, or across the notch and see Mt. Lafayette. A lot better than the V. A. Hospital water tower and a residential neighborhood. But is spectacular alpine scenery a necessary component of a beginner lesson?

[ January 17, 2004, 07:08 PM: Message edited by: David7 ]
post #12 of 20
My comment means you pulled the numbers out of your ass.

I'm just being an ass.

[img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]

4500 lessons a week

I'm speaking in averages here so bear with me.

So you are saying that they teach an average of 642 people a day 7 days a week? 53 people an hour for 12 hours if they had lessons every hour which they don't.

How is that even physically possible?

I'm sure you know better than I do but that is just crazy.

I have been to Nashoba once and that will be the only time I go.

That still doesn't change the fact that the newsletter has McIntyre on the main page.

I don't think that school kids or the parents that drive them to lessons are the target audience for a ski newsletter.

If it is then I will unsubsribe.
post #13 of 20
No, that's not where I got the numbers. Though you don't really deserve a civil response, pay attention anyway.

McIntyre has two sessions of pre-school lessons on weekday mornings, five days a week, averaging 75-100 kids in each. There is an early afternoon "mom and tot" lesson each of the five days a week, with about 25-30 pairs each day. There are after school lessons at 3:30 and 4:30 with about 200 to 250 kids in each lesson, five days a week. On Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights there are 6:00 and 7:00 lessons for older kids and adults drawing a total of about 500 students a week.
Saturday and Sunday mornings at 9:30 there are weekend kids programs with about 250 kids on Saturday and 175 on Sundays. Then there are group and private lessons every hour on the hour from 10:00 to 3:00 both Saturday and Sunday. Depending upon the weather there may be as many as 200 to 250 students in these over the two days. And then there are pre-school lessons at 3:00 on both days of the weekends with about 75 kids each day.

Because something isn't "physically possible" in your mind doesn't make it impossible.

So what's "crazy" about that?

[ January 18, 2004, 08:15 PM: Message edited by: David7 ]
post #14 of 20
David, that puts you at about 6375 by my rough calculations. You were being conservative, I see... [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #15 of 20
Geez, you're right, Steve. I overstated something, cause I know it isn't that many. It is around 4,500, though. I've seen it.

That wasn't my point, though. What I was trying to say is that there is a monumental ignorance on the part of many, including many within the ski teaching profession, about the huge role played by the small local areas in introducing new skiers to the sport. Scalce's attitude appears to be that only the big areas are "real" ski areas. Well, from my observation over more than thirty years, it is those big areas that turn off thousands of newcomers every season. The little local places like McIntyre are doing a great job of attracting new participants. So what happens when they graduate to the bigger mountains?

Does this belong in a thread on "retention"?

[ January 19, 2004, 05:43 AM: Message edited by: David7 ]
post #16 of 20
By the way...Lisamarie, I think the "adorable" ski instructors your original article was referring to are female instructors.
post #17 of 20
I understand that small areas do alot of teaching and that is their strong point.

But once again I am saying that to have a small mountain on a newsletter seems like it is trying to reach the wrong audience for a major distribution in the Boston area and New England.

I'm not a bad person but I can be a jerk sometimes.

[img]tongue.gif[/img]

Thanks for the breakdown of the lesson schedules.

I meant crazy as it's crazy that they teach that many people.

I just can't deal with smaller areas as they have a large amount of kids running around like crazy in the base lodge and restaurants.

Plus I like a nice sustained pitch because I like to work on linking turns for longer than 2 minutes.

I had some little kid today almost knock my wife and me over on the stairs because he was chasing his friends and couldn't wait for us to pass.

[ January 19, 2004, 08:59 PM: Message edited by: Scalce ]
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally posted by Scalce:

I had some little kid today almost knock my wife and I over on the stairs because he was chasing his friends and couldn't wait for us to pass.
"I had some little kid today almost knock . . . I over on the stairs because he was chasing his friends and couldn't wait for us to pass."
post #19 of 20
Look out! It's the Grammar Patrol.

Had a Patroller yell at me from the lift yesterday for ending a sentence with a preposition.

What was that all about?

[ January 19, 2004, 08:35 PM: Message edited by: David7 ]
post #20 of 20
I fixed my error.

[img]tongue.gif[/img]

Cut me some slack.

I got up at 4 am to drive to Okemo.
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