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The Right Tool For The Right Job - Page 2

post #31 of 44
Quote:
I also think that edge hold is more about how sharp your edges are than anything. I use ANTs as my really hard snow ski, and I almost never want something narrower. True, there are maybe a couple horribly nasty icy days a year that a race ski would be great, but I really don't see the need to buy a special ski for the couple WORST days a year. I will buy special pow skis for the few BEST days a year, but the days when I want something narrower than the ANTs are going to be mediocre no matter what I'm skiing.
Interesting. I concur about edges, to a degree. Soft snow skis can behave acceptably on hardpack if the edges are in order (otherwise, fahgetaboutit). I find that racing skis, even without edges, will still hold OK.

I agree, too, that it's better to buy skis with a best-case scenario in mind (eg, powder, for most of us). As I said above, I'd personally rather just have fat skis than race skis alone.

Still, I skied a good part of one season with nothing but a pair of 155 cm slalom skis, and they were fine in powder. In fact, if I had to be honest with myself, I'd say those skis gave me an easier time in deep snow than any of my fatter boards do on hardpack.

But I don't want to be honest in that way. As a powder fanatic, I have to have the right ski on the BIG day. I'm happy to have a good ski for ice too, but whatever.
post #32 of 44
My quiver is now 85mm waist (PE), 105mm waist (Gotama) and will add a 125+ Pow specific sometime over the next year. For most conditions..I love the Gotama. If it really hasn't snowed in awhile, I love my PEs on harder snow, bumps and even in small amounts of soft snow. I can't imagine needing anything narrower for exclusively west coast skiing. Additionally, there are only probably 3-5 days a year that I'll need a ski much wider than my Gots...but its still fun to indulge that. More power to people who like race carvers...I just don't prefer that style of ski and will probably never own one ever again. The freeride type ski is too versatile for me to give up.
post #33 of 44
I think you have to disclose where you ski on a thread like this.
post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by prickly View Post
I think you have to disclose where you ski on a thread like this.
What's the deal with folks that don't put anything at all for location? I understand why someone wouldn't put their address, but I like for folks to see the area I live in in case others want to hook up :or avoid me like the palgue!
post #35 of 44
Yeah, I like to know where you're coming from. Like, for example, if you come from Utah I don't ever wanna hear any whining from you.

I avoided putting my age in the profile. Kudos to crgildart for full exposure.
post #36 of 44
Ok, good point, I've skied Aspen for about 20 years. I now split my time between there and Big Sky/Moonlight Basin/Bridger Bowl. Even when Aspen hasn't gotten snow in a week, its usually still soft enough that edge hold isn't really a concern.
post #37 of 44
Ach! I don't think I ever did my edges the year I lived in Utah.
post #38 of 44
I live in DC but ski in UT; I rent a place with a group of folks for the season. Yeah...its true...my edges don't get dull very quickly . Have had 10 POW days out of my 18 days on the Mtn. this year. So yes, I very much have a Western bias in terms of my preference for skis.
post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferniefreeheels View Post
I find it amazing when I look around the hill and see what people got on their feet. For instance last sunday, (we haven't had any real snow for almost 2 weeks) I see this guy skiing with these huge pontoon type skis in. They are probably 120 underfoot and have a reverse camber. He is skiing and the only part of the ski hitting the snow is the part under his foot. Conditions are quite firm and he is fighting with them to make any kind of a turn and their flopping around like a lumber wrapper in a windstorm. So I say to myself "Self, why would anyone want to be on a ski like that on a day like today?"

I'm sure those skis are a lot of fun when the pow is deep, but they never looked like much fun to me the other day. Oh well to each his own I guess.
If they were pink and Praxis shaped, it was probably me. They have Dukes on them and the snow in Lost Boys/Fish is nice.. and they're not so fun to ski on the rained on/refrozen groomers. They rock everywhere else though
post #40 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by prickly View Post
Ach! I don't think I ever did my edges the year I lived in Utah.
I kept throwing mine in the vise every day, usually right before work closed and I was bored. I still take care of my hard snow skis like I always have...my soft snow skis get deburred every couple days and waxed once a week...sharpened every couple.
post #41 of 44
I do my edges more in spring than any other time of the season. Snow gets soft and then freezes over night. Early morning turns are very scrapey. Midseason not so much, usually.
post #42 of 44
Alright, I rode up Bear with two dudes with paper tickets riding some form of Iggy and DPS 138s. They went right towards Arrow rather than Cedar/Fish. Alpine binders. I guess some people just like to rock their expensive toys :
post #43 of 44
explain?
post #44 of 44
Translation: The duck was on a lift with some skiers, not locals with a pass, on seriously fat powder boards. They headed straight to the groomers. He agrees with the origianal poster in wondering why.
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