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Ski or Snowboard Lessons That Saved a Life

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Have you or a family members had any ski or snowboarding lessons that you feel may have saved a life?

Maybe you took a lesson and because of that lesson you were able to prevent someone else from serious injury due to your improved ability level from lesson(s) taken.

When was the last time you had a ski or snowboarding lesson anyway?


Do you now wear a brand new helmet for safety reasons but have not taken any lessons in years?
post #2 of 19
The last time I had a lesson was in December. I think learning is great.

I don't think ability level and risk have much to do with each other. Not in skiing, and not in a lot of other venues.

The last time I had a lesson that may have killed someone was 1995, because the instructor refused to stand in a safe area. Someone got hit and injured. Oops. Can't say I've ever had a lesson I could attribute to saving someone's life...at least not in skiing.
post #3 of 19
well I took an avalanche course (lesson) and that has and will save my life numerous times
post #4 of 19
Quote:
When was the last time you had a ski or snowboarding lesson anyway?
I've have a snowboard lesson about every 3-4 days this season.
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
I don't think ability level and risk have much to do with each other. Not in skiing, and not in a lot of other venues.
Interesting. My view on improved safety on the slopes is not how you cover up and protect your gray matter. It is more to do about what you do with your gray matter that will make the slopes a safer place. IMHO Taking lessons seems to me like a great place to learn new skill like skiing on one ski that may help individuals prevent injury.

Looking at the replies here, it seems lessons are not a real popular way to improve safety on the slopes. Oh well. Helmets on the other hand are real popular for improving slope safety. :
post #6 of 19
My point wasn't that your brain doesn't matter, my point was that the idea that "ability" has much to do with it is somewhat weak.

I used to be a lot more highly skilled in car control than I am now, due to lack of practice. Yet I'm still a bunch safer when I drive now, because I take fewer risks and I'm not a teenager. You see, risk isn't equal to ability. It isn't even close. In fact I believe if you look into it you'll find if there is any relationship at all, it is that the greater your skill at skiing, the more likely you are to kill yourself doing it.

It is pretty hard to kill yourself skidding turns on blue terrain. Now you've changed the goalposts to "help prevent injury" which is an entirely different matter than saving lives.
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
In fact I believe if you look into it you'll find if there is any relationship at all, it is that the greater your skill at skiing, the more likely you are to kill yourself doing it.

Unfortunate but true. On routine runs the speeds and hence forces are greater. On challenging runs, you graduate from "feels dangerous" to "actually is dangerous".
post #8 of 19

Skiing / advanced motorcycling...

Personally I think my advanced motorcycle lessons have been of most use, in this respect, on the ski slopes...


They were <cough>20 years ago now - and I've been using the skills daily ever since - which means they are part of my awareness of other people in almost any situation.

It's basically defensive riding/driving/skiing/boarding/walking/dancing... whatever... being aware of people all around you. Knowing that (as on a bike) when they hit you, you get hurt, so watch out on their behalf.
Knowing that when they stop hard in front, even if you make the stop, you have to let the guy behind make the stop too...
Sure there's the code - but then there are the people.

As for lessons - never been on ski a holiday where I haven't had a lesson - but I don't think any of them, including ESA, have helped save a life unless you count that I can now ski faster and steeper and still stay in control.
post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lbt View Post
As for lessons - never been on ski a holiday where I haven't had a lesson - but I don't think any of them, including ESA, have helped save a life unless you count that I can now ski faster and steeper and still stay in control.
Well that should count for something. Maybe what we need is ski and ride lessons specific to slope safety. The class could include how to ski on one ski, how to avoid a knee injury as shown here in Vermont Ski Safety Research and include Vermont's Eight Steps to Safer Skiing
post #10 of 19
Oh it does but I didn't think it was what you meant.

Hmmmm; whilst I applaud your intent, in my mind I hear the wind whistling as the tumbleweeds roll through the classroom... <grin>

I'm surprised you trimmed the rest of my comment though - I do think instructors should offer suggestions on 'awareness' and discuss these issues over lunch or as they apply to the lesson at hand. A lot of skiers drive so asking if they would just pull out onto a major road from a dirt track without so much as looking for big trucks seems like an analogy that works...


I've also been in classes where fellow pupils are muttering and keeping clear of someone whose concept of awareness spans about 20degrees in front of them out to a distance of maybe 20'

Another problem is that most people who care don't need the lessons
post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lbt View Post
Another problem is that most people who care don't need the lessons
Wow that was well said. Unfortunately very true.
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post

Do you now wear a brand new helmet for safety reasons but have not taken any lessons in years?
:

I wear a helmet. But have not taken a lesson. Is this wrong?
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skiing-in-Jackson View Post
:

I wear a helmet. But have not taken a lesson. Is this wrong?
Wrong?
Wise?

If I had a need to I could buy a calculator and teach myself about sin(), tan() and cos() by pressing the buttons and spending a *very* long time thinking about it. Or I could get a maths lesson - or read a book, or watch a video/DVD, or ask a friend, or go on the internet...

Lessons and learning are for people who feel it is a more valuable use of their time to benefit from the concentrated experience of others rather than blazing their own trail.

Neither is 'wrong' - depending on your goals, one may be a wiser choice...
post #14 of 19
Up until this year I had not taken any lessons in years. Took 2 this year (one on each of my trips out west) and it has greatly improved my skiing.
post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skiing-in-Jackson View Post
:

I wear a helmet. But have not taken a lesson. Is this wrong?
There are many ways to avoid injury. Wearing a helmet is one of your last lines of defense. Learning to ski safely is something everyone should learn. Staying away from a large crowds grouped on a trail. Don't stop where someone can not see you from above.

If your child is learning to drive an automobile, do you give them driving lessons or do you buy them helmet.
post #16 of 19
I wear a helmet for two reasons. First, I love to ski in the trees and don't like getting hit in the head with low aspen branches. More importantly, I wear a helmet to protect me from the crazy, out of control skier who is bombing down a run semi out of control. I worry about getting hit more than hitting something.
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post
There are many ways to avoid injury. Wearing a helmet is one of your last lines of defense.
Absolutely. Just like any safety equipment (like seatbelts and airbags). The point of safety equipment is as a secondary backup to an earlier failure. Preventing accidents is always preferrable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post
Learning to ski safely is something everyone should learn.
I think where lessons might make things clearly safer would be for people who think they are "experts" and really have no control. Of course, these people don't think they need lessons. One value of lessons is it changes the focus on what expert skiing is (ie, not straight-lining at high speed).

Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post
If your child is learning to drive an automobile, do you give them driving lessons or do you buy them helmet.
Would giving them driving lessons make it reasonable not to wear a seat belt?

It's not an "either or" thing. Concidered separately, one might be better than the other. Not having at least one of them is probably worse. Both might be best.
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post
If your child is learning to drive an automobile, do you give them driving lessons or do you buy them helmet.
I know a few parents buy their kids SUV's instead of cars. The rational being they'll be in better position when (not if) they get into accidents.

Driving lessons? Given how poorly many poeple drive, I think it's the parents that needs the driving lesson more than their kids.

So, the parallel of skiing lesson vs. driving lesson is a good one. No one will sign up for a "safety on slope" lesson even if you pay them to do it!

(come to think of it, perhaps if the resort offers "free lift ticket for attending a safety lesson", it might actually work)
post #19 of 19
as a beginner, i wouldn't be anywhere near the level i've achieved without lessons. i sincerely think that with anything in life, no matter how skilled you are there is always more to learn. it doesn't matter whether you've been skiing for 30 days or 30 years, i would say that a good skier of any skill level is always learning. my instructor has, without a doubt, given me tips and taught me skills that will protect me from harm as well as considering the safety of others, and certainly awareness and safety are the first steps to preventing accidents before they happen.
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