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Skiing analisys - my first video

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Any help in is welcome.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HRG-SOqEUX8




Thank you,

Alex
post #2 of 20
Alright, well, the first thing to remember is to try to keep your body vertical in relation to the hill. Near the top, I saw your body leaning into the turns a little to much but you began to correct it nearing the bottom.

And secondly is the pole plants. Take your time with them. The pole touching the ground should be the result of your body changing it's position over the skis; not because you are jabbing them into the ground. Say that you are going from a left turn into a right turn. You should move your right arm forward and place the tip just a few inches off the snow. The pole touching the snow should be the result of your body beginning to move into the direction of the next turn.
post #3 of 20
Hard for me to see a lot of detail, but you look pretty good for a guy your size! Others could give you a much better technical analysis, but I think I saw a bit of "tail wagging" after you past the camera.

How do you like your Lang Comp 100s?
post #4 of 20
Alex,

Nice skiing.

First some questions that a few people might ask before getting to an analysis. It will also help you look into your own skiing.

1. What was your intent during that bit of skiing?

2. What did you feel during that run? (Hopefully you can remember.)

3. Where do you want to go with your personal skiing?
post #5 of 20
Thanks for the video, Alex. Looks like fun skiing. You make generally consistent turns, but look from what little I can see in the video like you're working at it some. Maybe that's because they're all short turns.

Anyway, as you near and pass the camera, it looks to me as though you're tipping your torso forward more than I'd think appropriate, probably trying to get the fronts of the skis engaged. I think if you stood a little more forward by opening your knee joints a bit farther and using your ankle joints more, you'd be using the skis better.
post #6 of 20
Earlier in the video, it looked to me like your motions where much quicker on the top half of the turn than on the bottom half. With the camera angle and loose snow, it's hard to see the tracks. Were your turns round, same shape top and bottom?
post #7 of 20
Man that's hard to see in that light and lack of image stabilization.

Nice balanced , quiet movement and pole touches.

What I see is connected movement from the knees to the shoulders. We need to separate your lower body from your upper beginning with the hips. Allow the inside hip to lead into the turn while keeping the upper body facing into your destination with the turn radius you are using .

When you move into the turn keep the shoulder aligned with the terrain . Keep your inside hand a little higher to hold the inside shoulder up to prevent inclining into the hill. You want your movement to move in the direction of your destination not away from it.

A bit of counter will help you get that separation as well as trying to free up tension and allow some movement of flexion and extension .

Drills ? Pivot slips while keeping the body facing down the hill allowing the feet , hip and shoulders to move independently of each other Hockey stops doing the same. Set your poles on your arms while extended and ski while keeping your arms and shoulders level and quiet . Don't cheat by leaning into the turn . Hold your poles under your arms and face them down the fall line at a center target and let the lower body move under you. The feet will follow a bit of a different path as your upper body takes the shorter path.

Play with getting separated movement and let the feet move around your mass.
Most importantly . Relax and have fun
post #8 of 20
So many symptoms. Getting to the root cause is really pretty simple and Kneale is the only one who is in the right ballpark. Good call Kneale!

Fore / aft balance in powder, or crud doesn't need to shift backwards. Nor do we need to croutch down so low to improve our stability. The net result of these two is the hip staying too far behind the feet, the need for the pivot and push to an edge move, the ab-stem and the sequential edge release that happens at the end of each turn. It also is the reason behind the up move during the transition.
The solution? Stand up and maintain a taller more centered stance. Be more patient and let the turns develop instead of forcing the skis to pivot so much. This will also allow the pressure on the skis to build naturally, instead of adding so much artificial popping at the end of the turns. Even in short radius turns it should feel like you are swooping and scooping out turns instead of using such a hard edge set (check) and hopping from turn to turn.

Addition in editing:Alex you have a lot of strong movements in you quiver already, try using more touch and only as much effort as is actually necessary to acomplish the task. One of my coaches calls this Matching the intensity of your moves to the slope. Right now you're overskiing the turns.
post #9 of 20
I also feel by standing taller, there will be more action below the belt....legs looked frozen. For those short turns, I would have liked to see them moving...whether you are crossing over or under....Perferrably under on this size of turn.


Moving? Moving out from the center line of your body....this will get more edges, the "swooping" discussed above...a whole lot of things....I think you could manage another 12 inches on each side of a turn....more snow for the same ticket price.
post #10 of 20
Very nice skiing. Looking at it quickly revels noting I would like to comment on except that your feet are diverging some. I did not read all the other posts but saw that some have suggested you should stand taller. I think your upper body forward lean is ok. Looks like a racer.

Let me speculate a bit on the conditions. Not a very steep slope. Snow is medium fluffy and base is firm. You need a lot of speed to keep going and therefore you stay close to the fall line and link short turns that are not really needed for speed controll. Due to this you have a hard time committing to your turns and you need to be very light on your feet. This is the reason your skis keep diverging. If you had to use more force your platform would become stronger and you could use more power.

I think your skiing is great. You have good rhythm, you are not mooving up and down with your body, your hips are not rotating, you are not banking, you are not in the back seat, you are working with your feet, your arms look ok and your pole work is great. Only gipes I have for the time beeing is your diverging skis. You need to try to ski more two footed. You need to try to relese the outside ski sooner. Dont wait untill it skidds away.
post #11 of 20
TDK, a couple thoughts and ideas to consider...
  • The skis don't diverge, the tails wash (converging skis and a-frame) because of the strong push to an edge move. The visual clue to this is the hips dropping down and back through the last third of each turn and the heels and tails moving away from the body and eventually seperating. If he were more balanced over the outside ski (fore / aft and laterally) the tail wouldn't release like they are and the hips would move forward with the skis instead of stalling while the skis move sideways (skidding).
  • Releasing the outside ski sooner to prevent it from skidding? It's skidding because it is being pushed to an edge which is a skidding maneuver. It leads to it releasing when the hip drops back and inside the turn during the last third of the turn. He simply cannot keep pressure on the outside ski because his balance point has moved so far inside the turn. That also forces Alex to use the step onto the inside ski and use an up move of the hips to get himself back over the skis. Releasing the outside ski earlier would require him to move back over the skis earlier as well. Which isn't going to happen until he gets balanced over the outside ski. How can he do that? By not letting the hips fall back and inside the turn when it should be moving forward and towards the next turn. In other words he needs to ski a little taller, balance on the inside edge of the outside ski, and allow his hips to move towards the next turn.
  • Tactically he is forcing the turns by muscling the skis, not by working the skis so they shape smoother, rounder turns. The visual clue is the staccato and harsh nature of his movements. Especially through the last third of the turns. I feel the chosen rhythm doesn't allow him to work the skis effectively. He simply isn't that good yet. As an example I would be quick to point out that if you watch Rocca, he can make much shorter turns at an even faster rhythm but his skis still snake through the turns. Which is absolutely not how I would describe how Alex's skis are moving.
post #12 of 20
justannotherskipro - Yes, Rocca is a better skier. No doubt. And he snakes round carved turns on well prepared pist on TV. Not a very good comparisson IMO. My term for the diverging skis was probably wrong. You are right. They dont diverge. Maybe they separate but as you so well point out the outside ski looses gripp and skidds away. Main reason for this is IMO that the snow creates so much friction and the slope is not that steep. He needs to take a much more direct line. He also seems to try to make more turns than what the snow friction permits. Its also a once in lifetime chanse to get on film so he overskis. All this said, your observations are correct even though I was not trying to be particular about anything. Still think that standing taller would not really solve much but extending and flexing would. Hips forward is hard for me to comment on because I dont understand the consept of bringing the hips forwards myselfe. Not even after reading 1000 posts of indepth analysis. Alex is a good skier. Take him with me anywhere anytime.
post #13 of 20
TDK,
Too low and aft, paints him into a corner when it comes to tactics. The check at the end of the turns slows the skis down and almost allows the hips to get back over the feet. That is of course until he pushes the feet forward again. A defensive, braking turn type. Contrast that with offensive turns where the skier works the skis while staying more centered. To accomplish that he needs to extend while allowing the whole body to move forward not back. A common mis-conception is that you need to ski low and aft in that type of snow. Ski it the same way you would ski groomers. Double the steepness and he will be in big trouble.
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post
TDK,
Too low and aft, paints him into a corner when it comes to tactics. The check at the end of the turns slows the skis down and almost allows the hips to get back over the feet. That is of course until he pushes the feet forward again. A defensive, braking turn type. Contrast that with offensive turns where the skier works the skis while staying more centered. To accomplish that he needs to extend while allowing the whole body to move forward not back. A common mis-conception is that you need to ski low and aft in that type of snow. Ski it the same way you would ski groomers. Double the steepness and he will be in big trouble.
Maybe his boots are too stiff! Or he is not used to pressuring his shins and there fore brakes at the waist?
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
Maybe his boots are too stiff! Or he is not used to pressuring his shins and there fore brakes at the waist?
You could be onto something there. If it's causing him to drop his hips back and break at the waist, what's the remedy? My feeling is if he is over using the hips something else is being under utilized / flexed / extended. The knee bending without the ankles flexing? That would drop the hips back as well. So what is the remedy?

Keeping the hips closer to centered would require less knee and hip flexion. If you don't flex them as much how would that look? Wouldn't that cause you to stand a little taller? How would you move to get your hips moving towards the apex of the next turn?
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by alex077 View Post
Any help in is welcome.

Thank you,

Alex
Try to find a camera with a zoom lens.
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post
You could be onto something there. If it's causing him to drop his hips back and break at the waist, what's the remedy? My feeling is if he is over using the hips something else is being under utilized / flexed / extended. The knee bending without the ankles flexing? That would drop the hips back as well. So what is the remedy?

Keeping the hips closer to centered would require less knee and hip flexion. If you don't flex them as much how would that look? Wouldn't that cause you to stand a little taller? How would you move to get your hips moving towards the apex of the next turn?
OP would hate me for it but I would take him to the bunny hill and start going through the basics. He is good enough to do it. Anyway, thats where the possible flaws can be fixed. Or spotted. Maybe a simple gear issue. Problem with up-unweighting type skiers is that they brake at the waist at the wrong time, through apex and low C. This causes their butt to dropp back during the pressure phase and they end up in the back seat. To compensate they brake at the waist. This is bad.
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zippy View Post
Try to find a camera with a zoom lens.
No use of a zoom lens if you dont have a good cameraman. Allways film from the front.
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
No use of a zoom lens if you dont have a good cameraman. Allways film from the front.
O.K., thanks. I'll remember that if I should ever ask someone to video my skiing.
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zippy View Post
O.K., thanks. I'll remember that if I should ever ask someone to video my skiing.
Get Max to help you. He has turned out some really well captured stuff.
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