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Dynamic CoM Movement

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Edited by slider - 1/30/11 at 4:00pm
post #2 of 10
Maybe more than a mantra, or trigger move, you should rethink how you approach the tasks you described.
Offensive intent would include moving towards the next turn from the fall line of the current turn. By beginning to set up that early you will be ready for the new turn by the time you reach the end of the current turn. That doesn't mean you do not finish the current turn though. Most of your speed control should come from route selection and finishing your turns is a large part of that.

Here's an idea that might help you. Speed control depends on two factors, route and the amount of braking you use. On an open slope you can choose your route and skiing round smooth turns is an easier option than trying to do so in the trees. So it comes down to tactical decision making, choose the tactic that best suits the terrain.
In addition you need to revisit how you get from one set of edges to the next. Hard edging late keeps your body inside the turn when it should be migrating back to neutral. Try adding more edging (tipping) and pressure near the middle of the turn instead of waiting so late to "work" the ski. Then try moving towards finishing the turn on a flat ski (releasing the turn by reducing the edge angle instead of unweighting the skis).

Remember that on ice there is only so much edge purchase we can produce and late in the turn all of the forces are trying to pull you sideways (down the hill). Chatter and skidding happen as a result of overwhelming our connection to the snow at that point. So instead of trying to add edge and pressure at that point, we need to think about absorbing some of that pressure and reducing the edge angle. An added benefit is that it also allows you to keep the torso moving towards the next turn instead of it remaining stuck in the last turn.
post #3 of 10
Mantra's? We don' need no stinkin' ... Oh wait.

Flex to release is not a bad mantra for this. As Jasp has noted sometimes we just need to remember to let up off the edges through the bottom of the turns, especially on firmer snow. For those of us mere mortals without razor sharp edges and the ability to perfectly round out the first half of our turns above the fall line on steeper pitches with hard snow, this can be easier said than done. When I'm having a bad day, I'll cheat by pivoting first, then carving out the botom of the turn instead of trying to carve the top and end up skidding the bottom (or going back in to sharpen my edges). But when it comes to trees and hard snow, Rusty says "Just say no!"
post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
Flex to release is not a bad mantra for this. As Jasp has noted sometimes we just need to remember to let up off the edges through the bottom of the turns, especially on firmer snow.
I suspect this is a key point that will help Slider.
post #5 of 10
Line and tactics would be the first place I would start because setting up the release requires getting into a good place to perform it well. Slow line fast, high round line, it's all the same idea. Set yourself up for success before pulling the trigger on another turn. Only then can you expect to transition to the new turn effectively.

An additional though to ponder is that if we do not allow the ski to accelerate so fast in the first place, there is less speed to control later in the turn. Which also means there is less force to cause the skis to skid/chatter. IMO that means being very active in the first half of the turn. Leaving only two tasks for the second half of the turn.

1) using the engaged edges to turn the skis out of the fall line
2) progressively getting our body back over the skis / or our skis under the body in preperation for the edge change.
post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 

Edited by slider - 1/30/11 at 4:00pm
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post
By beginning to set up that early you will be ready for the new turn by the time you reach the end of the current turn.
May I ask how early should begin the set up? And does it depends on the turn radius?
post #8 of 10
I though I defined that in post 2 and 5. The second half of the turn starts halfway through a turn.
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post
I though I defined that in post 2 and 5. The second half of the turn starts halfway through a turn.
Thanks, this is one big misconception I have, I am always late despite many advises given to me before.
So I shall assume the same answer for all turn sizes.
post #10 of 10
Oh I wish it was that simple. To ski the high round line that would be a good assumption. Same basic movements done with different duration, intensity, rate, and timing.
If you ski a faster line (lower and more direct to the gate) tactics change. I suggest you buy the Alpine tactics CD from USSA if you want to explore this in depth.
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