New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Hestra Heli v. XCR

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Want to pick up a pair of Hestra gloves...wondering what the rationale would be for the Heli versus the XCR. Given extra waterproof-ness of the Gore-Tex XCR, is the only reason to go for the Heli the lower price? Or is there anything about the material that people might prefer?

Thanks in advance!
post #2 of 23
I am a hestra devotee so I am baised. Personally, I don't see the need for 100% h2o proof gloves unless you ski in wet areas. Hestra gloves, once they break-in are soft, pliable and warm. Aslo, they provide great dexterity and a very durable leather. I just picked up a pair on SAC and I think Gregmerz bought a real nice pair on the Hestra site at 50% off. You do have to oil them a couple times a season but they are great gloves.
post #3 of 23
I've got the Helis and never found them wanting in wet snow (you can treat the leather). I like 'em. They prolly breathe better than the XCRs, and they did cost less. FWIW, I ski Tahoe, and the snow can get pretty wet there. If I spent a lot of time digging around in the snow and/or setting up poles/gates, I'd wear something else though...
post #4 of 23
Be sure to get specs on breathability -- it may be a factor if your hands sweat a lot. I have found that my XCR gloves breath better than some of my other non-waterproof gloves. Often XCR is paired with other materials to enhance overall breathability.
post #5 of 23
I bought XCR's in December. I realize my experience is atypical, but I really don't like them. Yes, they're fine Swiss craftsmanship (made in China, actually), yes, they have nice size ranges for good fit, yes they're waterproof. But no, they didn't keep my hands warm, which is the primary function of a glove. At speed, when the temps were below 25 or so, the wind wicked heat out of the fingers faster than any insulated glove I've ever owned. Period. I've never had issues with cold fingers before, but I do with these. And no, no physiological/medical changes in me to account for it. All I can suggest is that the fiberfill they use is very old tech compared to most other companies' current insulation, and maybe it doesn't do the job as well as a comparable BD or other high end "guide" glove. OTOH, maybe I just had an out of body experience and dreamed the whole deal. Either way I'm out a lot of money. Buyer beware...
post #6 of 23
Unless you live in the rainforest, get the Helis and an extra set of liners. You'll still end up cheaper than going Gore-tex.

Due to frostbite from many years ago, my hands take a really long time to warm up. I've got Hestra Heli mitts for my "brutal arctic cold" gloves and they work fine.
post #7 of 23
Second that, the Heli gloves are the bomb. The XCR does not have a removable liner, which is great when skiing more than one day in a row. I have used them for the last year in Colorado. -11 top of Vail in January and I was fine in them. They stay quite dry most the time and are very warm. You can kick the warmth up another notch with some skin tight liners underneath.
post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
... Yes, they're fine Swiss craftsmanship...
Er, that's Swedish design. Hestra started out making gloves for loggers in the 1930's (Sweden has a LOT of forests). Hestra employs a common Swedish "form follows function", high quality approach to its products.
The Swiss on the other-hand make great chocolate and some great skis (Stöckli), among other things.
post #9 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanks, folks; Helis it is. If I'd realized the XCRs don't come with liners, that would have made the decision for me already anyway. Glad I learned that.

Next question: size. Tip of middle finger to base of palm, 7 1/4". Measurement around hand is 8.5". Size 8 or 9?

Thanks!
post #10 of 23
9, the sizes run small. I am about 7 3/4 and I wear a size 10.
post #11 of 23
I have a set of Hestra Helis (non-XCR) and leather Swanys (the "x" glove with "triplex")

Honestly, I find the Swanys to be warmer. Plus, the Swanys have the nose-wipe on the thumb
post #12 of 23
I have the swanys and stopped using them. They are too bulky. The Hestras give you much more dexterity. I use a glove liner and they keep my hands warm down to -3 so far.
post #13 of 23
Not to hijack (but I am) anyone see the MAnzella "Awesome" glove? Similar construction to Hestras
post #14 of 23
I have a pair of the XCRs and find them warm and comfortable. One really cool thing is they came with a label attached: "Not For Snowboarding".
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by irul&ublo View Post
I have a pair of the XCRs and find them warm and comfortable. One really cool thing is they came with a label attached: "Not For Snowboarding".
I've seen that tag. What's the deal? Are the leather palms that susceptible to cuts from edges while carrying a board? Or is it more just a joke or something?

I've been thinking about picking up a pair of Heli's, I really like the removable liner vs. the XCR's.
post #16 of 23
I also have the heli's, I like them in warmer weather, though I find they do get very wet, typically from the inside out.

Curious what product you guy's are using to WP the gloves?
post #17 of 23
I have the Helis too. If the Heli XCR has non removable liner that would be a reason to buy them under no circumstance for me. The leather even when nicely catered for is not very waterproof however I will just change liners 2-3 times daily (mostly because of swetty hands) and the Hestras are quite nice gloves overall. For skiing they usually stay quite dry if you however go through the snow with your hands quite often (like when freeriding on a snowboard) then they get wet quite easily. Won't use any goretex gloves anymore however as they are no better at all (sweat simply won't go out fast enough).

The not for snowboarding sticker is because ANY leather is not really abrasion resistant when having your hands on the snow while carving. Therefore for carving I just use overgloves or if conditions seems really bad (like frozen snow in spring mornings) I use welder's gloves beacause I don't really mind to get a new pair every 5-10 days once there done.
post #18 of 23
I just picked up a pair of XCR's on tramdock.  Does everyone treat their leather?  Will it increase the lifetime of the glove?  If so, with what?  I could only find one thread discussing this and it only had one response.  This thread has a lot more info on Hestra, specifically XCR's.

Thanks.
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier2369 View Post

I just picked up a pair of XCR's on tramdock.  Does everyone treat their leather?  Will it increase the lifetime of the glove?  If so, with what?  I could only find one thread discussing this and it only had one response.  This thread has a lot more info on Hestra, specifically XCR's.

Thanks.

Hestra sell a little pack of stuff to treat the leather. I seems identical to SnoSeal to my eye.
post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevesmith7 View Post




Hestra sell a little pack of stuff to treat the leather. I seems identical to SnoSeal to my eye.
I saw that.  But is it necessary?  Hestra does not say anything about care on their website. 
post #21 of 23
I have the leather Hestra Vertical Cut gloves --  they are going on 5 years. I have never treated the leather, accept to use saddle soap to wash them and get the dirt off. My gloves had white leather. I am sure it couldn't hurt to treat them but I have not had any issues with durability. Hestra gloves are built like a tank. It takes a lot of use and abuse to damage them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier2369 View Post

I just picked up a pair of XCR's on tramdock.  Does everyone treat their leather?  Will it increase the lifetime of the glove?  If so, with what?  I could only find one thread discussing this and it only had one response.  This thread has a lot more info on Hestra, specifically XCR's.

Thanks.
 
post #22 of 23
Necessary? Probably not, but they'll be more water resistant and stay flexible without cracking longer. Will they last for years without it, most certainly.
post #23 of 23
I have been using Mink Oil on all my leather gloves. Available in many stores next to shoe polish. Keeps the leather soft, pliable, waterproof and more comfortable.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion