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K2 extremes

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
My uncle gave me a pair of K2 extremes the other day with Marker M51 twin cam bindings. I don't know what size they are, but they are about 6 feet long. He said they were really good skis and i was wondering what makes these skis so good. I'll attach a picture.

I am posting here because the people at the Teton Gravity research forums are no help as you can see here. http://www.tetongravity.com/forums/s...d.php?t=113337
Thanks for any responses.
post #2 of 26
Ah, those fellows on TGR are a fine bunch. I think what they were saying, sans diplomacy, is that these skis were probably average for their day, but are hopelessly outdated at this point and not worth the trouble. They might make a good wall decoration, but you wouldn't want to ski on them nowadays.
post #3 of 26
As mentioned, those are what we now call "straight" skis. Newer skis are much wider, have more sidecut, and are generally quite a bit shorter than skis from that era. The new types of skis turn better and are much more versatile in their terrain and conditions capabilities.

While those skis were on a par with other stuff from that era, they are currently considered obsolete.

SJ
post #4 of 26
Thread Starter 
Well I got em for free so I can't argue with the price. I haven't skied in a while because I just never had the money for rentals and the lift ticket and stuff. I started working at the local ski resort so I can ski for free. These should get me to the end of the season and maybe last next season without any problems right?
post #5 of 26
Yep, get some boots that fit nice and snug with no hotspots, make sure the bindings are functioning and adjusted properly, and go for it! You can probably borrow some poles from the rental shop if you promise to bring them back at the end of the season.
post #6 of 26
I guess the skis will be fine if you have never experienced a modern ski before, but they will suck compared to any ski that was made within the last 5-10 years. I once broke out my old straight skis for nostalgia's sake, and couldn't bear to make more than one run on them. They truly sucked compared to my newer skis.

Make sure the bindings are checked out and functioning OK before you get on these skis. How tall are you and how long are the skis?
post #7 of 26
6 feet is going to be about 180 to 185 cm depending on how you measured them. Is probably said on the side between the bindings. Assuming you can get the bindings set for your weight and ability I wouldn't hesitate taking them out and trying them on some hard pack assuming you aren't under 5 feet tall and can ski reasonably well. I'm one of the few old school folks hanging around here with more straight skis than shaped skis in my quiver (barely). I'd use them before giving them away or throwing them out..
post #8 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Incenerator View Post
I am posting here because the people at the Teton Gravity research forums are no help as you can see here. http://www.tetongravity.com/forums/s...d.php?t=113337
I'm sorry, but those responses were remarkably polite and well-considered, particularly given the context. The only reason I could see to describe them as "no help" is if you already knew what answer you wanted to hear.

These skis were fine in their day. The sun set on that day 15 years ago. Pick up a pair of good cheap skis made this millenium -- I have three in my locker, total cost $100 -- and if they don't already have bindings on them, I think the M51s are still indemnified and will do in a pinch.
post #9 of 26
nice
post #10 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Incenerator View Post
I am posting here because the people at the Teton Gravity research forums are no help as you can see here.
They pointed you here didn't they?
post #11 of 26
Thread Starter 
I'm 5'9" and around 220lbs. I picked up some brand new nordica B7 boots for $100 and brought my skis to the ski shop at ski resort where i work and the guy said the bindings are fine. I guess what i meant by the guys being no help at teton was mainly refering to them says how I don't belong there.
post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Incenerator View Post
...and brought my skis to the ski shop at ski resort where i work and the guy said the bindings are fine.
Did he just look at them, or did they do a tension release/torque test with the boots in the bindings?

If they didn't do the test, they can't really say. Are you willing to risk your knees and or health to 10-15 year old bindings?
post #13 of 26
Thread Starter 
He had the boots in the bindings and was pulling them out and putting them back in. They are set at a 7 for the release.
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Incenerator View Post
He had the boots in the bindings and was pulling them out and putting them back in. They are set at a 7 for the release.
By hand or with a machine/tool? If not tested on a machine, that 7 might not mean anything. Feeling lucky?
post #15 of 26
Thread Starter 
By hand and a screwdriver. He said they should be ok, just before I ski to check them by twisting my foot out or something like that.
post #16 of 26
The bindings suck, but the skis are fine. If you really can't afford better bindings, crank the forward pressure. It'll help a teensy bit.
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
The bindings suck, but the skis are fine. If you really can't afford better bindings, crank the forward pressure. It'll help a teensy bit.
Jer's right, If you weight 220 you can go up a bit past 7, maybe 7.5 or 8. If you are an advanced skier you will want them even higher. But please have someone experienced help. There are online tools you can reference but knees don't grow back ya know.:
post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Incenerator View Post
By hand and a screwdriver.
Screwdriver or torque wrench? Unless it was a torque wrench, the binding will release, but you don't know if it will come off when the correct load is applied to it. Are you sure you want to take that risk?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Incenerator View Post
He said they should be ok, just before I ski to check them by twisting my foot out or something like that.
I can't tell you how bad this advice is. Bindings serve two purposes. To hold the ski on under heavy loads when you need them to and to release when those loads become too great. Guessing by "twising my foot out" could cause you to be hurt if you ski comes off under the wrong load or not coming off when you need it to.

After you blow your knee out or break your leg, print this thread out and try suing him for negligence, unless your state is a compensatory negligence state, then, well, your screwed. Enjoy rehab.
post #19 of 26
What kind of answer were you wanting to get from TGR or here? You've asked the question to two groups of people who know a little about skis, granted that often we know less than we acknowledge. Both have pretty much told you that they are a little past their prime. The bottom line is that it might not happen the first time out, but you will get hurt on these bindings. That is the straight forward scenario. I think it is a little cheaper to get a safe pair of skis and bindings than to replace an ACL. On a side note, the "guy" at the ski shop should be fired.
post #20 of 26
Hey everyone: unless I'm mistaken, those bindings are still on the indemnified list. And with those toes, he'll more than likely pre-release out of them than destroy his knee because they didn't release.

crgildart - I was talking about cranking the forward pressure, not the spring tension (DIN).

As far as the skis - why not ski them? I still have skis that are even older than those. It's not like they're impossible to ski.
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
crgildart - I was talking about cranking the forward pressure, not the spring tension (DIN).
OIC, but wouldn't you agree that someone pshing 220 would want to set above 7.0? The calculator I use says 7.5 for a level 3 skier over 200 pounds and under 250. I'm 165 pounds and usually set between 8 and 9 depeding on the binding. I make sure I can twist out and step out..
post #22 of 26
Thread Starter 
Whats a indemnified list? I googled it and a list came up with a bunch of bindings listed but i didn't understand it.
post #23 of 26
Quote:
in·dem·ni·fy /ɪnˈdɛmnəˌfaɪ/
–verb (used with object), -fied, -fy·ing.
1.to compensate for damage or loss sustained, expense incurred, etc.
2.to guard or secure against anticipated loss; give security against (future damage or liability).
An "indemnified binding" is one for which the manufacturer indemnifies -- i.e., assumes the liability -- for a shop that mounts and adjusts it. Unless a binding is indemnified, most shops refuse to mount or adjust because of fear of liability.
post #24 of 26
Thread Starter 
Oh okay. Thats good then because mine are still on the list. I'll hopefully be taking these skis out tommorow so I'll let you guys know how it goes.
post #25 of 26
Thread Starter 
So I took these skis out last week sometime and I wasn't doing to bad on them but they require so much more effort to turn with. I was doing fine coming down a beginner trail when I caught and edge and my tips crossed, went down right on my face. So yesterday I went skiing again and took advantage of my complimentry rentals and took out a pair of 160 Elan's. No problems at all and I was skiing a hell of a lot better. So at the end of the season my dad is gonna get me a pair of the used ones from at the ski resort.
post #26 of 26
You could probably sell them on craigslist fairly easily. If you post them set them for about $50.00 firm. Or, you could hang on to them and try them again in a year when you get a bit more experienced.
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