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Sharpening plastic scrapers

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 
Do people sharpen their scrapers often? Or do you just buy a new one when its too dull, OR do you just keep using the same one regardless?
post #2 of 35
I keep my fat scrapers forever and just run them along my file.

fat scrapers rule and are often hard to find. (by fat, I mean 1/4 of an inch or more... many are just a few millimeters-- those suck no matter how sharp they are.)
post #3 of 35
Sharpen every couple of pairs of skis. I keep a panzar file screwed down to my workbench and a few passes sharpens well. Also have a tool made just to sharpen them which I run them over.

Scrapers last for years this way and a sharp scraper works much better!
post #4 of 35
Like any cutting tool, you need to keep them sharp for quicker, easier & better results. Why waste the material and just toss them when they can be used for years. Having a couple/few around is also nice when you have a lot of scraping. Setting up a 90° guide or bench vise with coarse or panzer file works well. So does a large flat file on a bench a belt sander, jointer, etc.
post #5 of 35
Can slightly bending a plastic scraper as you pull it along the length of the ski cause the base itself to become slightly concave? Every now and then I think I see a bit of black stuff mixed in with the clear wax, and wonder if I'm pulling off base material.
post #6 of 35
post #7 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
Can slightly bending a plastic scraper as you pull it along the length of the ski cause the base itself to become slightly concave?
Not very likely, not over fewer than hundreds/thousands of scraping passes. You can test this yourself by attempting to scratch the Ptex at the tips or tail with the scraper. Not very easy to do, unless you pull 13a at the rock gym.


Quote:
Every now and then I think I see a bit of black stuff mixed in with the clear wax, and wonder if I'm pulling off base material.
Weren't you having trouble with base burn with those 11.20s not too long ago? That could be one reason. A few others I can think of.
post #8 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by axebiker View Post
+1
post #9 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
Can slightly bending a plastic scraper as you pull it along the length of the ski cause the base itself to become slightly concave? Every now and then I think I see a bit of black stuff mixed in with the clear wax, and wonder if I'm pulling off base material.
If your scraper only slightly bends without a lot of force being applied, the material coming off is likely micro-hairs from abraded p-tex. P-tex develops micro-hairs as consequence of skiing since snow-especially new snow, is very abrasive. Also, likely candidates are dirt, oil and other junk that finds its way onto snow from wind, snowmobiles and ski lifts.

With a plastic scraper, if it's sharp, and you are applying a lot of pressure it might affect the base. Certainly a steel scraper will. However, as you describe it it doesn't seem to be cause to worry. There shouldn't be any reason to bend the scraper though because, except at the tips and tails of today's wider skis, the base should be flat. If your skis are edge high they may be in need of a stone grind.
post #10 of 35
I've used a medium and course drywall screen to sharpen the plastic scrapers. I have one Swix scraper that is getting older and actually has some knicks that may be ready to be tossed.
post #11 of 35
To sharpen my plastic scrapers, I use a very sharp metal one! I lock the plastic scraper into a vise and starting at the far side, I drag the metal scraper towards me in a relatively quick but controlled manner.

2-3 full length strokes and the plastic scraper is as good as new.

Caution- it may take some practice before you become adept at this way of doing it. But once you get it, it is the fastest way to put a wicked clean and sharp edge on your scraper!
post #12 of 35
I stapled a folded square of course grit sandpaper to my bench. I have a scrap of wood (piece of shingle) and I hold the scraper tightly to the wood and run vigorously across the sandpaper.
post #13 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Not very likely, not over fewer than hundreds/thousands of scraping passes. You can test this yourself by attempting to scratch the Ptex at the tips or tail with the scraper. Not very easy to do, unless you pull 13a at the rock gym.


Weren't you having trouble with base burn with those 11.20s not too long ago? That could be one reason. A few others I can think of.
Yes, I was trying to figure out how to get rid of base burn. This year I've been religious about waxing twice a week, and I began the season with a hot scrape and some gentle scrubbing with fibertex. Base burn all gone. They probably do need a stone grind, but I'm holding off as long as I can see structure. Good to know the slight concavity is most likely not my fault. Thanks.
post #14 of 35
I have one of these on my bench. Have used it for a couple years. Wash in hot water and soap when it gets clogged. Does a great job and easy to use. Lasts way longer than the product description says.

Found at :http://www.tognar.com/wax_tools_hot_...owboard.ht ml

PLASTIC SCRAPER SHARPENING SCREEN
Our sharpening screen is handy for keeping the edge on your plastic wax scraper clean and crisp. Simply lay the screen down on a flat workbench. Then, bearing down slightly, slide the long edge of the scraper down the length of the screen. The screen's abrasive coating cuts away a little plastic with each stroke...so keep stroking until the scraper edge feels square and sharp. Each screen measures about 4 inches wide x 11 inches long, and is good for about a dozen sharpenings.



Item #JAN-99438
Scraper Sharpening Screen: $2.95 ea
post #15 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai View Post
I keep my fat scrapers forever and just run them along my file.

fat scrapers rule and are often hard to find. (by fat, I mean 1/4 of an inch or more... many are just a few millimeters-- those suck no matter how sharp they are.)
Try what a friend did years ago. bought a piece of Lexan and cut it up into rectangles. He made about 50 scrapers. I grabbed 5 or six and still use them 20 years later.
post #16 of 35
I have the Toko sharpener with the ceramic blades that I use sometimes. Generally though, I just pull it freehand against a big panzer file. I used to use a 90 degree guide, but just found it unnecessary.
post #17 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
Yes, I was trying to figure out how to get rid of base burn. This year I've been religious about waxing twice a week, and I began the season with a hot scrape and some gentle scrubbing with fibertex.
No hot scrapes since then?
post #18 of 35
I cheat.....I use a knee mill to sharpen my scrapers, and yes the thicker ones are far better.
post #19 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkevenson View Post
I have one of these on my bench. Have used it for a couple years. Wash in hot water and soap when it gets clogged. Does a great job and easy to use. Lasts way longer than the product description says.

Found at :http://www.tognar.com/wax_tools_hot_...owboard.ht ml

PLASTIC SCRAPER SHARPENING SCREEN
Our sharpening screen is handy for keeping the edge on your plastic wax scraper clean and crisp. Simply lay the screen down on a flat workbench. Then, bearing down slightly, slide the long edge of the scraper down the length of the screen. The screen's abrasive coating cuts away a little plastic with each stroke...so keep stroking until the scraper edge feels square and sharp. Each screen measures about 4 inches wide x 11 inches long, and is good for about a dozen sharpenings.



Item #JAN-99438
Scraper Sharpening Screen: $2.95 ea
This is drywall screen you can buy at Home Depot. I think its about $4 for two sheets.

This is also what RShea mentioned above......

It works great, it's inexpensive, and lasts along time. Been using it for years......
post #20 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
No hot scrapes since then?
No. Should I? This is all new to me. Thought hot scraping was good for getting the old gunk out of the structure. I assume with all the real snow this season here my skis have accumulated less gunk.
post #21 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
No. Should I? This is all new to me. Thought hot scraping was good for getting the old gunk out of the structure.
It is. (Unless the 'old gunk' happens to include high fluoro wax)

Quote:
I assume with all the real snow this season here my skis have accumulated less gunk.
Hmm. That might be a suspect assumption, highly dependent on what it is you're calling 'gunk'.

In fact, the dark bits in your scrapings might be 'gunk', only cold scraped instead of hot.
post #22 of 35
No doubt about it that when the scraper flexes you are taking off base material and making the bases concave. Try to apply even pressure and scrape several times with medium pressure rather than try to get all the wax off in one hard scrape.
post #23 of 35
Agree on the general point that keeping your scraper sharp makes life much easier. I use a drywall screen (and hold a 2x4 next to it as a rough guide). Various different abrasives will, of course, work, and I'm pretty sure you could do a good job without the guide if you have a steady hand.

I agree with Comprex: unless you're really trying (hard!) to do so, you won't take off base material with a plexi-glass or plastic scraper. That's what metal scrapers are for.
post #24 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by vail snopro View Post
To sharpen my plastic scrapers, I use a very sharp metal one! I lock the plastic scraper into a vise and starting at the far side, I drag the metal scraper towards me in a relatively quick but controlled manner.

2-3 full length strokes and the plastic scraper is as good as new.

Caution- it may take some practice before you become adept at this way of doing it. But once you get it, it is the fastest way to put a wicked clean and sharp edge on your scraper!
That's the basis for these scraper sharpeners:

post #25 of 35
I use one of these. There happens to be a plastic fabrication business in my family, so scrapers, lifters, and machinery to make both is easy to come by. I use a shaper and a vacuum pump/jig to make them from scratch though.
post #26 of 35
Initially, I used the Toko scraper sharpener tool which is made specifically for this task, but I was never impressed by it. I have a jointer, but I've always been afraid that it rip the scraper out of my hand. What I do with the jointer though is use the fence to guide the scraper and tape a piece of drywall screen to the surface of the jointer table.
A professional tuner showed me the method of using a belt sander (needs to be longer than the scraper to keep it flat) and to then touch it up on a taped down piece of fine sandpaper.
The latter two methods work better than the Toko scraper, IMHO.
post #27 of 35
I do what Mango Jizz does. Panzar file that came with screw holes. Screwed to bench. Run it along a couple of times and all set to go. Its amazing the difference after sharpening.
post #28 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkevenson View Post
I have one of these on my bench. Have used it for a couple years. Wash in hot water and soap when it gets clogged. Does a great job and easy to use. Lasts way longer than the product description says.

Found at :http://www.tognar.com/wax_tools_hot_...owboard.ht ml

PLASTIC SCRAPER SHARPENING SCREEN
Our sharpening screen is handy for keeping the edge on your plastic wax scraper clean and crisp. Simply lay the screen down on a flat workbench. Then, bearing down slightly, slide the long edge of the scraper down the length of the screen. The screen's abrasive coating cuts away a little plastic with each stroke...so keep stroking until the scraper edge feels square and sharp. Each screen measures about 4 inches wide x 11 inches long, and is good for about a dozen sharpenings.



Item #JAN-99438
Scraper Sharpening Screen: $2.95 ea
http://www.buyhardwaresupplies.com/?...emNumber=18005 or similar brand (does not have to be 3M but they make good stuff usually).

Should be able to pick these up locally at any good building supply store- save on shipping, they usually sell in fine medium or course depending . I also find that they are usually good for more than 12 sharpenings, unless you have a really dull one or knicks that need removed. You can use the full sheet running the scraper up and down a few times then move to a new spot. Once one side is about done, I flip it over and use the other side which can usually cut some more.
post #29 of 35
Panzar in a 90-deg guide works great for me.
post #30 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by axebiker View Post

I have the same one and it works pretty well.
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