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Pictures of how much wax you drip when hot waxing

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
I've tried to search and look around here and the web, but was trying to get a picture of how much wax you drip on your bases before passing over it with an iron. I'm just using hydrocarbon waxes and wax fast, so I didn't want to mess with the crayoning it in.

Any help would be appreciated
post #2 of 25
This should get you where you need to go
http://www.tetongravity.com/forums/s...ghlight=waxing
post #3 of 25
I would consider this to be on the heavy side.

post #4 of 25

Olee scromolee

Quote:
Originally Posted by Voltron View Post
I would consider this to be on the heavy side.


+1. About twice, maybe 2.5x what I'd use for an intermediate hot scrape.
post #5 of 25
That is definately a lot of wax.
I tend to use a bit more than pictured in the thread on TGR but I do get quite some spill and I get to scrape a lot off.
I just don't want to have any dryer patches on the ski and eventhough probably unnescesary it makes me feel "safe".
post #6 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Voltron View Post
I would consider this to be on the heavy side.

Apparently, these are the first pair of skis that he's waxed on this bench. After this waxing, he is going to have a lot more wax on the bench than those few drops that I can see!
I crayon the hard wax on the bases to give a consistent, light coating first to prevent the iron from hitting any bare spots.
Then I touch the wax to the iron and rub it on the ski in a similar fashion - it is not as consistent as the first layer but it will blend well when ironed. This adds a second coat of wax to most areas.
Then I drip a light coating of wax in the less covered areas on the ski and iron it in. It just takes practice and there is not one "correct" way to do it. I rarely get wax dripping onto my bench now, whereas when I started, it was a mess. FWIW, it's better to start with too much wax and to waste some than to use too little and damage your skis. Practice. It's not that hard.
As the World Cup Tuner that helped me with my technique said, "There is not only one way to tune skis."
post #7 of 25
Crayon it on. Less is more. Wax is like a womans shirt. There should be enough to cover everything but also be thin and slick enought to keep it interesting.
post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Racer256 View Post
Crayon it on. Less is more. Wax is like a womans shirt. There should be enough to cover everything but also be thin and slick enought to keep it interesting.
And it should end up on the floor
post #9 of 25
last night, just about right, not much scraping, good coverage.



post #10 of 25
Thread Starter 
thanks everyone, this has been a great help. I'm going to try the crayon thing first, then I'll drip like a mkevenson picture. It looked nice and easy.
post #11 of 25
It's also easy enough to start out dripping the bare minimum and drip more if you feel the need. Personally, I find dripping faster and easier than crayoning. Additionally, if you drip and iron the wax in sections, the drips don't harden which speeds things up a bit and gives you immediate feedback on volume required.
post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkevenson View Post
last night, just about right, not much scraping, good coverage.
ooooh... VERY close. With perhaps 3-4 more drops to strategically fill those gaps, here is my wax job from last night. Almost never get any drippage on sidewalls or floor, and more than enough to scrape. My biggest problem is working around the plastic bumper cap on ski tips, which gets in the way of iron... but as long as none of you ever inspect the rough spot by tips... works for me! :

post #13 of 25
I usually drip somewhat of a line down each edge--seems to work fine
post #14 of 25
Quote:
I'm just using hydrocarbon waxes and wax fast, so I didn't want to mess with the crayoning it in.
Actually, I find that you'll save a fair amount of time AND wax by crayoning it on before ironing, if you do it right. Heat up your iron, then just touch the wax to the iron's base for an instant, and crayon on one stroke with the soft, warmed wax. Repeat--touch the iron-rub-touch-rub--until you've covered the base with a very thin layer of wax. You'll use much less wax than dripping it on, and you'll cover the base more evenly, protecting the P-Tex while you iron in the wax.

When you've ironed it in sufficiently, hold a layer of lint-free paper towel or "Fiberlene" under the iron and make one smooth pass the full length of the ski. This will soak up excess wax, leaving a very smooth, very thin coat. I rarely even scrape after this step, unless the "perfect" wax job is critical (racing), saving even more time scraping and cleaning up wax shavings.

Like I said, it's actually quicker this way, once you get the hang of it, and you'll save wax and minimize the mess you have to clean up.

Best regards,
Bob
post #15 of 25
Bob,

You make it sound too hard.

Brush the $h!t out of the base with your brass brush. Take the bar of wax (my bar is now about the size of a large twinkie) and rub on a layer with the widest flatest part of the end. For small bars lilke swix packs, use the side of the bar. Color like a skittled up toddler. Wear gloves. The ski base is covered in on no time. Iron it in.

Scrape ( the waste will be very little) and BRUSH.
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Color like a skittled up toddler.
Great image, Racer256!

I still think my way--touching the wax bar to the iron first to warm it up a little--is quicker, especially with harder cold-snow waxes. The semi-liquified wax glides on easily that way. Could save you a few Skittles!

Besides, everyone knows that real ski tuners are fueled by beer!



Best regards,
Bob
post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes/Colorado View Post
Great image, Racer256!

I still think my way--touching the wax bar to the iron first to warm it up a little--is quicker, especially with harder cold-snow waxes. The semi-liquified wax glides on easily that way. Could save you a few Skittles!

Besides, everyone knows that real ski tuners are fueled by beer!



Best regards,
Bob
post #18 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

ahhh the years of experience helping out the first timer! i've got a pair of skis that I waxed on Friday and just have not pulled the scraper out because of the huge mess with too much wax used.

Crayon's and skittled kids, yes! Its warm now here in Boise, so my 5 year old can help me color the skis (he do any thing for me for money as he says he is saving up for a house).

Greg
post #19 of 25
Look around for bulk blocks of universal wax. Shop on the local hill sell big blocks of Swix universal in a zip lock bag for $6. At that price you can afford to drip it all over the place the first few times until you get things dialed in. Plus, using universal you will end up waxing a little more frequently.
post #20 of 25
I haven't tried the crayon method.

For dripping, I start sparse. If you get wetting across the whole ski, it is enough. If not, add a few more drips (you have a hot iron in your hand, after all).

Of course, I'm not using fancy high-melting point waxes, so I'm not too worried about letting the iron touch a bare spot for a moment once in a while.
post #21 of 25
I crayon mine on. WAYYYY better than dripping IMHO (100% coverage - no bare spots to worry about), and a lot less waste.
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Warp daddy View Post
I usually drip somewhat of a line down each edge--seems to work fine
+1. I drip along both edges in a relatively uniform stream, which seems to be a perfect amount.
post #23 of 25
Mine pretty much look like post 12 above.
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes/Colorado View Post
I still think my way--touching the wax bar to the iron first to warm it up a little--is quicker, especially with harder cold-snow waxes. The semi-liquified wax glides on easily that way.
Another variation of the hot touching method is to repeatedly 'touch' the bar to the iron base for a few second and then rub the iron on the base.
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Voltron View Post
I would consider this to be on the heavy side.

Michael Jackson called - he'd like his other glove back...

JEEBUS!!! That's enough wax for three sets of skis.
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