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Lost Ski

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I got a text from my son in Colorado this afternoon, telling me he had been skiing with friends, hit a bump at speed, had a double release, and now can't find one of his skis. 15 people looked for an hour with no luck. He marked the spot and informed the patrol, but left minus one. Not sure of the current conditions, but it must be buried in fresh snow.

Has anyone had this happen to them? He's bummed to say the least.
post #2 of 18
Bummer, Have hear of this happening numerous times.
A couple of weeks ago I can across a guy searching for his ski. He had popped out and had hiked up 10 yards to start looking for it. I made a quick survey and spotted his ski 50yds down the hill. If it was a steep slope they may not have been looking down the hill enough......
post #3 of 18
This happened to my cousin on a brand new pair of skis while I was skiing with about 2+ feet of fresh on double jack at Park City about 20 years ago...single ski tip dive/release that he skied away from...he ended up having my old pair redrilled and used them the rest of the trip with no new snow. 6 days later, on his last afernoon skiing before flying back home, he saw a little black spot in one of the troughs between moguls and was able to dig out his ski which was pointing straight down...had it snowed during the week, it is likely that the ski would not have been found until spring.

good luck to your son...
post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Argus View Post
Bummer, Have hear of this happening numerous times.
A couple of weeks ago I can across a guy searching for his ski. He had popped out and had hiked up 10 yards to start looking for it. I made a quick survey and spotted his ski 50yds down the hill. If it was a steep slope they may not have been looking down the hill enough......
If you happened to be in Les Arcs last month, it sounds like you were the one who helped me locate my ski...still can't figured out how it got so far down the hill with all the soft snow...
post #5 of 18
MEfree30,
It would have been nice to be in Les Arcs last month, but I was skiing deep Pow in the great Pacific Northwest.
With fresh snow sometimes a ski can just submarine and jettison down the hill with no firm snow for the brake to grab onto.
post #6 of 18
I had an incident once where I crashed, one ski came off and submarined for about 5 metres, then shot up and out of the snow and landed about 15 metres further down and to the left. I didnt see this as I was tumbling at the time. Lucky for me a nice person happened to see it all, and skied over and told me to look about 15m away from where I was looking, 10 mins later I found it there.
post #7 of 18
I came accross a guy digging up half the mountain at Whistler last week, and when I asked him what he was doing he was searching for his lost ski.

He must have dug about a 10 x 15 x 6 foot deep divot in the trees when somebody asked from about 25 yards down the hill - "hey what are you doing?" When he said "searching for a ski", they said - "it's right here".

Use powder straps or search further than you think it is.
post #8 of 18
And people wonder why I use old fashion style safety straps on powder days: There are times when it's better to keep the ski with you
post #9 of 18
Metal detector? I'd think that walking under the lifts with a metal detector would be profitable too.
post #10 of 18
I had this happen at Louise in early December this season. I took a wrong turn down a recently opened cruddy, rutted and stumped blue run, caught my left ski in some undergrowth (this was still early season and we were the only ones on this run, it may not have even been open yet) and popped out. I had no idea where it was, and after about a half hour of searching in the general area, I was about to leave my right ski there and hike out. I figured one ski is of no use to me or anyone else, so I might as well leave the pair there so someone might use them again. By this time my ski buddy had hiked up and within a few minutes his fresh pair of eyes found it wedged into a covered bush.

I was lucky to find it, and am considering using some sort of streamer device to help me find them next time I foray into deep snow.
post #11 of 18
Yep, happened to me too.
The ski did indeed move on all by itself under the fresh snow for over 50 meters adn stopped on road under the slope.

A buddy of mine once lost a ski in a small avalanche. He never found it...
post #12 of 18
About 6 years ago we were skiing Turbo at A-Basin, and my wife fell and had a yard sale. When the dust settled, she was sans one ski. We and the ski patrol dug and dug all day, but we never found it, and she had to hike down. As the ski was a metal Volant, the next week we came back with a metal detector and shovels. We dug up Turbo, we dug up Rock Garden on the left, we dug up the chute next to Turbo on the right. No ski. So, we came back in July (do you have any idea how steep Turbo is without snow on it?). I found the ski ten feet up, in the branches of a tree, down in the woods where Turbo runs out.

Oh, and then there was a cute scene at the ski shop when the technician looked the ski over and asked, "Lady, where do you store your skis?"
post #13 of 18
Runaway skis do weird things under the snow. Always look further away and downhill from where you think it is. There is no less than 6 or 8 single skis buried on this mountain right now... just from this season alone! I lost a ski in an avalanche once and went back and found it the following July!

You still have a pair of skis, just not this season! Call it cold storage!
post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
After getting an update I learned he landed about 10 feet out of bounds, on a steep slope that remains closed. The patrol won't allow a search futher down than where he landed since its not controlled. They said if it doesn't appear in the next week, then June/July is the soonest he see it again, but told him that by then the based will be oxidized, the edges throughly rusted, but maybe the bindings will be salvageable. What a tough life lesson.
post #15 of 18
This happened to me last April at Stowe. One of my skis unclipped when I took a fall on the goat, thankfully I was able to find it a few yards away from me buried inside a mogul. While my ski buddy and I were looking for in a few skiers stopped and suggested that we look down hill and on the edges of the trail since skis tend travel underneath the snow if they detach at decent speed.
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Festus View Post
the based will be oxidized, the edges throughly rusted, but maybe the bindings will be salvageable. What a tough life lesson.
I've seen lots of skis that folks let get coated with road salt, then sit in their garage without rinsing off get pretty nasty and corrode. If you can find it it will probably be in better shape than that. Nothing an hour with a file, stone, and some steel wool won't resolve. Just be sure to treat the other ski evenly and they should be fine.
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Festus View Post
After getting an update I learned he landed about 10 feet out of bounds, on a steep slope that remains closed. The patrol won't allow a search futher down than where he landed since its not controlled. They said if it doesn't appear in the next week, then June/July is the soonest he see it again, but told him that by then the based will be oxidized, the edges throughly rusted, but maybe the bindings will be salvageable. What a tough life lesson.
Dude, your ski will fine! My ski (buried from 12/05 - 7/06) had only slight surface rust on the edges and the base wasn't oxidized much at all. The binding passed a torque test without a problem either.
post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks to all, everyone I've spoken to told me the ski would be fine, just will need a good tune; I think the kid was working his old man in hope for replacements. Little bugger...
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