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cold temp wax in rain?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Heading up to Quebec next week -- temps now predicted at least for start of the week to be at freezing or a little above, with some rain. I hope it's snow not rain, too early to know for sure, but the question is this.

All the skis have been waxed with Swix CH4 (mixed with some racewax cold-temp hydrocarbon to make it easier to work with). Scraped and brushed thoroughly. Last weekend, the predictions were sub-zero temps for the foreseeable future there, I figured this couldn't hurt, having a good hard wax on the base would help if it's super cold and would hold up better for a week in Quebec.

Now I'm looking at wet warm predictions and wondering what the CH4 will be like in slush or mashed potatoes. Most of the skis had decent structure and a lot of all-temp wax in the base before the CH4 mix.

Relax or do something? Get a steel brush to open up the structure even more if needed? Really don't want to re-wax -- 8 pair of skis for the group.
post #2 of 16
Been there, done exactly that.

The skied-out packed bits are usually fine.

Anything that looks even modestly unskied will feel like someone slammed on the emergency brakes, for that over-the-handlebars-we-go sensation.

My tactics would be to brush, brush, brush with horsehair, then polish out with grey and white pads under a palm sander. Take Zardoz and Ivory soap with me. Hertel Spring Solution or glacier wax if any's around.
post #3 of 16
I would go for a can of the F4 paste and rub it over the top, let dry and buff out with a fine griding particle pad (white).
Ivory soap only lasts a couple of runs at most.......
post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
Oh crap. I don't have a horsehair brush, just brass and nylon. And I'm not going to have control of the group or want to have them run to me for help on the hill. What I have is - brass and nylon brushes -- some Toko all temp and Toko warm HC wax, and also some racewax cold and warm HC wax. No power sanders. So what would you do, with what I've got?

No supplies sold locally -- beyond your basic hardware store.
post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
PS - looks like a temporary event -- my canadian weather site only went out to Monday but according to a 10-day weather.com prediction, it goes back down to the teens and twenties Tuesday through Friday.
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by ts01 View Post
So what would you do, with what I've got?
Pick up some Zardoz or F4 quick-wipes and give them out. Relax.
post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks. I forgot to mention I've got some F4 paste and a cork - never use 'em. Maybe this is the time -- wiping with the paste, letting dry and corking?

I also am going to relax and hope the temp swings down a few notches and turns all my worries into big fat snowflakes. Stranger things have happened.
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by ts01 View Post
Thanks. I forgot to mention I've got some F4 paste and a cork - never use 'em. Maybe this is the time -- wiping with the paste, letting dry and corking?
That's the procedure. If you're going to do it, use -very little-* paste, otherwise you're making brush-out work for yourself.

With Z the procedure is: wipe on with bases up - let sit - pack.
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
That's the procedure. If you're going to do it, use -very little-* paste, otherwise you're making brush-out work for yourself.
Agreed put the paste on thin. It dries pretty hard and you are looking to save energy/time here. You can reapply every day, even rub on thin and just ski it. When the temps drop back down your CH4 will probably still be there.
post #10 of 16
The time to wax is the night before. I would leave what I had on there until the last night, then spend the time doing a quick re-wax using the right temp wax and an iron, then scrape and brush.

I would likely be too lazy to take the old wax off, I would just let it mix in with a bit too much of the warm temp wet weather wax under my iron.
Even as lazy as I am, I would not try skiing with cold weather wax in warm wet snow/rain (been there done that, learned my lesson).
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
The time to wax is the night before. I would leave what I had on there until the last night, then spend the time doing a quick re-wax using the right temp wax and an iron, then scrape and brush.
No doubt you're right -- but I've got six skiers with eight pair of skis on board, and a very long drive in a very full van leading up to that night before. Gotta deal with what's possible, not what's perfect.

Also gotta teach the kids to wax their own skis but that's another issue entirely.
post #12 of 16
Now is your chance to teach them. Set up an assembly line. Get one of your kids to drip the wax on the bases for you. Teach them how to pass the iron over them. Wax 'em before going out for a night cap. Scrape in the AM. Scraping should be easy; it's warm temp wax.
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Just wanted to offer thanks for the advice. Paste wax got us through the rainy day -- reapplied at lunch and noticed (or convinced myself) a difference. Still a sticky unfun mess, would've sucked either way with 1 cm rain and high 30's temps on top of 250" snow...

Then it froze up and froze HARD, single digit temps the rest of the week, and the CH4 did its stuff. Only 1 pair with significant base burn (telemark skis - seem to lose wax under the bindings area real fast), rest could use a wax but are not too bad.
post #14 of 16
Thanks for feedback, always a good thing, and glad you had fun.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ts01 View Post
Then it froze up and froze HARD, single digit temps the rest of the week, and the CH4 did its stuff. Only 1 pair with significant base burn (telemark skis - seem to lose wax under the bindings area real fast), rest could use a wax but are not too bad.

Ya know, if you're going to keep on using that stuff, a roto might be a worthwhile purchase.
post #15 of 16
I just got back from a trip where I had to wax skis in a motel room where I had to be very careful not to make a mess. What a pain!

And I had to fix a rock gouge with ptex out on the porch. Don't know if it was the matches or the breeze or the cold temps, but I had a lot of trouble getting the ptex stick to light. Ski area motels ought to have tuning rooms.
post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 
comprex - thanks, i'm always in the market for new tuning tools. because, as i've explained repeatedly to my wife, it saves money to buy new tools. hopefully someone here can provide the mathematical proof for this argument. but for now i was going to just wax over the ch4 with a warmer wax, maybe give it a hot scrape and go back to an all-temp wax now that it's march and my next trip is out west where it won't be so godawful frozen.

mdf - i saw a place in lake placid that advertised a tuning room, and i've stayed in several b&b's where by asking nicely they set me up with sawhorses in the garage. by asking nicely, i mean "you know i sure don't want to drip wax on the nice carpet -- do you think i could work out in that garage out back?"
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