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Stiff boots and achy legs

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I am skiing new Lange WC 120 boots this season -- they are a higher, stiffer boot than I've used before, and I realllllly like them. After playing around with adjustments, I've settled on taking one screw out of the spine to soften them up a little bit. That seems to be just about perfect for me.

Except when it isn't. Which is very rarely, but I've had a couple of days this season where my legs just didn't have it, and the glorious instantaneous response of those boots turns into painful instantaneous transmission of shockwaves into my body.

As I said, it's probably been only about two days out of the entire year, but they were days I didn't want to quit skiing, though I sure did want a softer boot.

Certainly I'm not the only person this happens to ... any suggestions? I have tried buckling more loosely, but that just makes me ski worse, of course. I can't take out the spoiler because I need it to keep the cuff tight enough. I already take 600-800 mg of ibuprofen before skiing, as well. Just suck it up and deal with it???
post #2 of 15
for that day remove the other screw on the rear spine?

remove the spoiler and tighten the buckles more. If the buckles are maxed then make a new hole in the cuff 15mm further over and re-screw them in that new hole.
post #3 of 15
Replace the stock power strap with a Booster Strap and use it between the tongue and the cuff. this allows you to keep the tongue tight on the leg but the Booster is elastic and gives, stretches and rebounds when flexed. Depending on your weight you might want to try the 1 or 2 band strap. I use the 3 band but am 6'0" and 185 LBS skiing in a Head Raptor 150 (set to 140 Flex) plug boot and have fairly long tibia's so leverage is not a problem.

I probably could not ski this boot without softening it if I did not use a Booster Strap.
post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
Replace the stock power strap with a Booster Strap and use it between the tongue and the cuff. this allows you to keep the tongue tight on the leg but the Booster is elastic and gives, stretches and rebounds when flexed. Depending on your weight you might want to try the 1 or 2 band strap. I use the 3 band but am 6'0" and 185 LBS skiing in a Head Raptor 150 (set to 140 Flex) plug boot and have fairly long tibia's so leverage is not a problem.

I probably could not ski this boot without softening it if I did not use a Booster Strap.
You know, I have some Boosters that I haven't put on yet ... I was picking up my boots from the fitter last week, and asked for a pair. I noticed they were the Expert (2 band), which said 180 lb and up? I'm 135. But he said it was the right size.

I was in a hurry and he was with another customer, so I didn't question, but they seem pretty burly. I thought I might give them to my husband and try the smaller size. Or maybe I'll try these first.
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mntlion View Post
for that day remove the other screw on the rear spine?

remove the spoiler and tighten the buckles more. If the buckles are maxed then make a new hole in the cuff 15mm further over and re-screw them in that new hole.
I never thought of moving the buckles over even MORE. Yikes.
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
...I have tried buckling more loosely, but that just makes me ski worse... I can't take out the spoiler because I need it to keep the cuff tight enough..I already take 600-800 mg of ibuprofen before skiing
...skip the meds

Like Atomicman, I'd look at the Boosters. In my particular experience with them employed I’ve maintained a constant positive pressure and flex with complete contact with the liner cuff while still able to release some lower buckle pressure without loss of performance. Releasing some buckle pressure with the strap cinched up tight later in the day has relieved for me [near your description] some discomfort from hard charging that happens from time to time [btw, for me this past weekend at Vail with the warmer afternoon spring like conditions and the feet swollen while charging with a Mach schnell posse]. With the Booster Strap I have a greater breadth of fine tuning with respect to a balance between performance and comfort as deemed necessary. Certainly I have much more fine tweaking than the stock boot Velcro closures provide…which I now view as nothing more than window dressing. And on the topic of window dressing so too the stock spoilers as they simply just occupy space and should not be considered IMO the appropriate method closing diameter on your lower leg or increasing forward lean…which is the particular job of the boot geometry. Regardless, if the Booster Strap is properly installed with the banding placed on the liner tongue and not the boot plastic above the top buckle [as I have seen some folks do] then you have your cuff working for you anchored correctly to the boot at the back of the shell. Any ‘space’ is then eliminated around your leg with your fore/aft lean transmitted progressively…working to better offset the slack due to the softening your particular buckle adjustments or boot spine work. Note that some modifications maybe necessary for your boots for proper installation and performance. [BTW, I use 3 band and Betsy uses 2 band]
post #7 of 15
Some pics of my Rpators. Note; we ground the top of the shell to accomodate the booster sat flat and fit under the shell on top of the tongue.
525x525px-LL-vbattach2770.jpg
525x525px-LL-vbattach2771.jpg
525x525px-LL-vbattach2772.jpg
post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks all for the replies; I'll install the Boosters asap.
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
Thanks all for the replies; I'll install the Boosters asap.
i am also a bit suspect of the spoiler. Langes are known for a fair amount of forward lean. You may want to try removing the spoilers and ski a few runs and see how you like it.

I would only change 1 thing at a time though so you can identify what made the difference.

so I would put the Boosters on first and then ski a few runs with the spoilers in and then remove the spoilers (same day same conditions) and see if you like that better.

A bit of a more upright stance is the trend now. Alos more often then not women' s calves are larger lowere on the leg then men's and all the spoiler does is push you too far forward and keep your heel form getting completly backin the heel pocket because the back of your leg hits the spoiler before your heel can get back.

it's worth some experimenting anyway and removing the spolier is easy!

let us know what worked for you!

Best of luck!
post #10 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
i am also a bit suspect of the spoiler. Langes are known for a fair amount of forward lean. You may want to try removing the spoilers and ski a few runs and see how you like it.

I would only change 1 thing at a time though so you can identify what made the difference.

so I would put the Boosters on first and then ski a few runs with the spoilers in and then remove the spoilers (same day same conditions) and see if you like that better.

A bit of a more upright stance is the trend now. Alos more often then not women' s calves are larger lowere on the leg then men's and all the spoiler does is push you too far forward and keep your heel form getting completly backin the heel pocket because the back of your leg hits the spoiler before your heel can get back.

it's worth some experimenting anyway and removing the spolier is easy!

let us know what worked for you!

Best of luck!
I already tried the spoiler thing ... my calves are pretty long and thin (the reason I'm in this boot instead of a ladies boot to begin with), and I really needed that spoiler to take up room. I have since moved the cuff buckle over to the tighter setting, but I think I might max it out again if I take out the spoiler.

But if I use the Booster, then maybe I can wrap the cuff tighter, and take out the spoiler just on my slow days? I mean, the boots are great the vast majority of the time, so I don't want to do too much to them. An easy adjustment for rare occasions is all I need.
post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
BUMP ... those Boosters are the best thing since sliced bread!

I used them last week in Lech-Zurs, where we skied three days and every snow condition imaginable from rainy slush to fresh deep snow. I didn't fiddle with my buckles ONE time, which is unimaginable. Adjusted everything in the morning, and that was it.

I'm a convert.
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
BUMP ... those Boosters are the best thing since sliced bread!

I used them last week in Lech-Zurs, where we skied three days and every snow condition imaginable from rainy slush to fresh deep snow. I didn't fiddle with my buckles ONE time, which is unimaginable. Adjusted everything in the morning, and that was it.

I'm a convert.
post #13 of 15
You need to compensate on those days by loosening up other joints. Some people use a shot or two of Jagermeister or Scotch.
post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
You need to compensate on those days by loosening up other joints. Some people use a shot or two of Jagermeister or Scotch.
ha ha .... well, it's stiff boots, not stiff joints, anyway. That's the least of my problems! (I tend toward the hypermobile, loosey goosey. Raggedy Ann on skis)
post #15 of 15
Boosters AND Advil. Can't go wrong...
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