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How sharp edges? - Page 2

post #31 of 41
Question -- I'm usually sharpening my edges twice a week, once before a beer league race on Wednesdays, and once before free skiing on the weekends. I do the fingernail test first, and usually find dull spots. Sometimes I just sharpen the areas that seem dull. Other times I use a marker to darken the sides before applying the file from end to end. I finish off with a diamond stone, and that's it. I'm skiing mostly on hard snow.

I was told today I was sharpening the skis too often. Could I be unnecessarily shortening the life of the skis? I'm new to tuning my own skis, so would appreciate any advice.
post #32 of 41
Thread Starter 

Filing v. honing

I am not a ski sharpening expert, but it is my view, based on metalworking experience, that filing is excessive for just sharpening. You would file if you were changing the angles, or found it necessary to reduce the profile below a nick or pitting. But to sharpen an undamaged edge you need only hone, with a stone, or a diamond hone. These will remove very little material, and will leave a much finer surface, which will stay sharp longer.

So, if you are filing every time, yes, you are unnecessarily reducing the life of your skis.
post #33 of 41
Don't forget to wet your stones. I usually use diamond stones, and only recently started tuning my own. However one fine day last year, I just couldn't seem to get them sharp with stones alone. I took a file to them, and to my horror I found a whole lot of metal curling off (talk about a hanging burr, I had a curly strip come off). Despite the wasted metal, the skis were sharp when I was all said and done: file, coarse stone, fine stone, with edge guide.

I also do the finger nail test, but I have found my edges at times sharp enough to shave fingernails, but still not sharp enough to meet my standards. I ski a lot of ice.
post #34 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by jviss View Post
I am not a ski sharpening expert, but it is my view, based on metalworking experience, that filing is excessive for just sharpening. You would file if you were changing the angles, or found it necessary to reduce the profile below a nick or pitting. But to sharpen an undamaged edge you need only hone, with a stone, or a diamond hone. These will remove very little material, and will leave a much finer surface, which will stay sharp longer.

So, if you are filing every time, yes, you are unnecessarily reducing the life of your skis.
I consider my self a tuning expert. Most recently, due to some new tools and an extremly accurate measuring device, my tunes have been absolutley outstanding.

What you have posted is exactly the case, I will only add that once you set and polish your base edge all further polishing and honing should be done on the side edge only.
post #35 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
...once you set and polish your base edge all further polishing and honing should be done on the side edge only.
That is what I try to do also, but sometimes you have to take some burrs off the base edge. I do this very sparingly, using the least abrasive stone and/or ceramic/arkansas that I can get away with very lightly.
post #36 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMoritz View Post
I do this simple test everytime I go skiing. Simply reach up and take your skis off the rooftop rack. In doing so make sure the fleshy part of your palm is pressed against the recently sharpened edges. Grasp the skis so you pinch the skin. Curse as the edges cut into your palm. Then, measure the depth of the gouge in your flesh. If it's at least 1/4" wide and 1/8" deep and bleeding profusely then you've done a good job on the edges. 'tis only a flesh wound, as the Black Knight would say, then you need to spend more time at the bench.
Ha! I can relate.
post #37 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by NE1 View Post
That is what I try to do also, but sometimes you have to take some burrs off the base edge. I do this very sparingly, using the least abrasive stone and/or ceramic/arkansas that I can get away with very lightly.
My last step anytime i do anything to the side edge is to run an arkansas stone flat down the base edge followed by a gummi extremely lightly at a 45 degree angle to the edge tip to tail.
post #38 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
My last step anytime i do anything to the side edge is to run an arkansas stone flat down the base edge followed by a gummi extremely lightly at a 45 degree angle to the edge tip to tail.
Brother!
post #39 of 41
run your gummy flat too. I don't actually touch the very corner of the edge with my gummy. It is amazing how much my edge turns into a mirror from my gummy.

mmmm... gummy
post #40 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai View Post
run your gummy flat too. I don't actually touch the very corner of the edge with my gummy. It is amazing how much my edge turns into a mirror from my gummy.

mmmm... gummy
flat on the side edge?
post #41 of 41
both side and base edges... but a fraction of a millimeter away from the very edge.
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