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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Can more edge angle help a torsionally soft ski?
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Can more edge angle help a torsionally soft ski?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
O Gear Gurus: Reading through the discussions on base and edge angles haven't quite answered a question I've got: I'm wondering how to tune a new pair of Volkl Sanouks. They're 193cm, 130-110-120, 40+m radius, soft both longitudinally and torsionally, and by most accounts a really floaty, fun powder ski.

Since the tune doesn't matter for powder, I'd like to get them set up to help compensate for their weaknesses: poor edge grip on hardpack and terrible crud-busting. I'm not trying to make them an everyday ski, just would like to be able to ski the groomers to and from the pow with confidence.

Can tuning with a more aggressive side angle help a torsionally weak ski? Or will more grabby edges just make a floppy ski even sketchier in crud/refrozen?
post #2 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by anthill View Post
Can tuning with a more aggressive side angle help a torsionally weak ski? Or will more grabby edges just make a floppy ski even sketchier in crud/refrozen?
Yes. Yes.

MHO: An aggressive side bevel kept sharp will help. However, if you run it straight to the tip and tail, the ski might get even more unhappy when you have to pivot it on hard/sketchy snow. Or it might not. Hard to tell without trying. I'd first check (as in with tools, not with internet folklore) base bevel and flatten it down towards 1 degree if necessary, then throw a sharp 3 degree from tip to tail on, and soften back from the tip first a couple cm at a time and maybe even a wee bit at the tail until it feels $$$.
post #3 of 10
IMO I wouldn't think it would help. You have a ski designed for one thing, that's skiing deep powder. If you want to ski groomers you need to get a more suitable ski.

Don't try and make it into something it's not designed for.
post #4 of 10
Between wind, avi control, stuff steep enough to slough off entirely, and days after it snows, there are plenty of good reasons to have a powder ski that works on hard snow.

Who said anything about groomers? And yes, all common powder skis are designed to work on hard snow. If they weren't, they wouldn't have edges, let alone sharp edges.

/I ski 110mm skis, and I even tune them.
post #5 of 10
Right but he's trying to make it something it's not. I ski my Gun's when the spring time comes here in VT. But I think this year my AC4's will be a better choice, something to do with them being torsionally stiff.
post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the answers - I'm definitely aware that I'm not going to get a one ski quiver. That's what my 777s and GS skis are for.

Quote:
wind [crust], avi [chunks] ... slough, [crud], there are plenty of good reasons to have a powder ski that works on hard snow.
Yep, that's what I'm hoping for - I'm happy to slap some lipstick on the pig, if it handles just a little better on the way to and from the pow.
post #7 of 10

OR, a little further out of the box AKA counterargument

You could turn the flex into an advantage:

Use hips and core strength to flex them and steer them into really, really short arcs. Muscle them in (groin towards apex), and muscle them out (groin towards fall line). Presto: speed and grip control.
post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 
Comprex, you got it, that's the intent behind the Sanouk's softness. In soft snow, the shovel floats and it's easy to flex them into snappy short arcs.

That being said, I haven't actually skiied them yet so I'm not sure how easy it'll be. Some reports like this make me think that a tune that gives them a little more ice ability might be reassuring. The transition from deep flexing short arcs to skidding straight on 48m radius skis sounds "exciting".

I'll guess I'll try putting a 1/3 deg tune on them and detune the tips/tails if they're twitchy.
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
You could turn the flex into an advantage:

Use hips and core strength to flex them and steer them into really, really short arcs. Muscle them in (groin towards apex), and muscle them out (groin towards fall line). Presto: speed and grip control.

You mean Waist-steering?
post #10 of 10
If that's what it is;

Should work on hardpack too.
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Can more edge angle help a torsionally soft ski?