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Another skier died today - Keystone

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
The article doesn't have any details. Here is the link: http://www.denverpost.com/breakingne...=rssfeeddigest
post #2 of 13
It does now... Score another one for the trees.
post #3 of 13
John McWethy was living a golf/ski retirement dream that many of us aspire to, quite an accomplished TV News Correspondent: http://abcnews.go.com/US/story?id=4253571&page=1

With all due respect, the trail where his accident occurred, Porcupine, is an exceptionally beautiful place to meet your maker. Photo of the run from family visit to Keystone last April:
525x525px-LL-vbattach2738.jpg
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by axebiker View Post
It does now... Score another one for the trees.
Yup, apparantly tree beats helmet yet again I'm still gonna make my kids wear them.
post #5 of 13
Does it just seem like it, or do most fatalities this season appear to occur in intermediate trails?

I've never skied out west (or on a serious mountain), so I'm wondering how difficult the blues are out there ?
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
Yup, apparantly tree beats helmet yet again I'm still gonna make my kids wear them.
Helmet (or no helmet) wasn't a factor here. From the article:

Quote:
McWethy died of blunt force chest injuries after witnesses said he missed a turn on an intermediate trail this morning, and slid chest first into a tree
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by uricmu View Post
Does it just seem like it, or do most fatalities this season appear to occur in intermediate trails?

I've never skied out west (or on a serious mountain), so I'm wondering how difficult the blues are out there ?
Keystone boasts a plethora of mellow blues that you might find to your liking. The trail at issue is very manageable by most intermediates and is no more steep than the North Face Slope at Seven Springs, PA, only twice as long. It is true that there are many challenging blue runs in the Rockies (or New England for that matter) that are as steep or steeper than anything at Seven Springs, only they get the bumps groomed-out on a regular basis, making for easier going and an "intermediate" designation.

I wonder if the newsman hit a tree in the center of the trail, or something on the edge? It is the sprinkling of trees in the center of this trail and view of Breckenridge beyond that make it extra pretty.
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by uricmu View Post
Does it just seem like it, or do most fatalities this season appear to occur in intermediate trails?

I've never skied out west (or on a serious mountain), so I'm wondering how difficult the blues are out there ?
Many fatalitties happen on intermediate trails. Often the victim is an expereinced or expert skier. They are often skiing at a very high rate of speed and not leaving a margin for error so that if they make a mistake like catching an edge, they go off trail or hit an object at a high rate of speed.

You have nothing to worry about
post #9 of 13
I know a lot of these runs well. They are usually blue groomers that are just steep enough that it takes a little more skill than the average low intermediate to ski at a controlled pace but tempt the lesser skier to go a lot faster than they should. They actually encourage fast skiing by people who shouldn't be. See it all the time.
post #10 of 13
What sad irony - according to the article, he was in the Pentagon on 9/11, then was ABC's primary reporter at times from both Iraq and Afghanistan, survives all that, yet he buys it while skiing.

Condolences to his family, friends, and colleagues on their loss.
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post
Keystone boasts a plethora of mellow blues that you might find to your liking. The trail at issue is very manageable by most intermediates and is no more steep than the North Face Slope at Seven Springs, PA, only twice as long.
The thing about seven springs (and what makes it convenient for horrible skiers like me) is that it is built like steps, so you can always check your speed and I think there's a limit on how fast you can go. It's also relatively wide slopes so you don't worry about trees. I only get scared when I hit the really thin Yodeler trail because then I feel that if I miss my turn I'll be flying over the edge.

Is that trail particularly thin o just constant grade? I'm wondering because I'm planning a New England trip in March and my wife is always scared when I go skiing, this might make it worse since it's on a groomer, not backcountry.
post #12 of 13
Skifox, fear is your worst enemy on the slopes. It make you hesitant and tense and affects your balance and control in very negative ways. Take a lesson or two, gain some confidence and your fears will dissapear and your skiing improve.
post #13 of 13
I hit a tree yesterday and dislocated my shoulder. Fortunately it popped back in with some help from a friend. I also severely bruised my elbow/forearm and ribcage. I was wearing a helmet and it saved me from losing some skin and having a bad headache.
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