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Inside ski pressure ? weight on inside ski - Page 3

post #61 of 121
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogue skier View Post
Too far back and you get too much.
You mean if the ski is to far back? Does that happen? It seem slike often when the ski is too ar ahead, you get too much weight on the inside ski, but no pressure on the edge. The scissors look.
post #62 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
The other variable here is speed. Slower turns you need to be more two footed.
If we are not talking very fast, faster is generally easier because you get away with more faults. Slowing down any video reveals many flaws in technique that are not visiable at normal speed. A year ago there was a lot of talk about "active" vs "passive" weight transfer where the general opinion here at epic was that weight does not need to be shifted to the outside leg because the centrifugal force would take care of that once the ski edge was engaged and and CoM was deviated from its original pathway, even in very slow speed wedged turns. Im a true believer in the active weight transfere for the simple reason that at slow speeds there is not enough centrifugal force available and especially at turn initiation it is nonexisting. If we are going across the slope there is actually more weight on the downhill ski since gravity is pulling that way making it even harder for the weight to get transfered to the outside ski. The active weight transfer helps you to ski using proper efficient outside ski pressure even at slow speeds. A very wide stance and slow speeds are working against that consept therefore higher speeds are suggested for better outside ski weighting and pressuring. But that is in my opinion wrong. Slow arcing javelin turns are very hard to make. No big issue for me offcourse .....

From a technical standpoint: pressure cannot exist without a force and a force cannot be generated without a mass (BigE and other posters claiming this are right)
post #63 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogue skier View Post
The problem happens when you try to put weight on your inside ski the tendency is to shift your body inside and hence you loose balance against your outside ski.
I know that its hard for people to balance on their outside skis but they need to angulate more. Ever seen a rope dancer that did not angulate to recover?
post #64 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phlogiston View Post
As far as pressure vs weight; when I put pressure onto one ski I'm invariably putting some of my weight onto it. Maybe that's just a problem I have with my balance.
No thats not your problem.
post #65 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogue skier View Post
I will try not to ramble
Too far ahead and you lose shin contact hence pressure. Too far back and you get too much. The problem happens when you try to put weight on your inside ski the tendency is to shift your body inside and hence you loose balance against your outside ski.

Rogue, please expound on your thoughts here with some more detail and (for me) include some timing detail. I think there is some choice meat there, but I can't taste it yet! :
post #66 of 121
This whole thing started when a student said something about keeping some weight on the inside ski. While it is important for us to write things clearly and use the correct vocabulary, a student's response does not need to be corrected. Unless of course you feel compelled to correct them. Jusy be careful, if they get the move, why obsess about what they call it?
post #67 of 121
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post
This whole thing started when a student said something about keeping some weight on the inside ski. While it is important for us to write things clearly and use the correct vocabulary, a student's response does not need to be corrected. Unless of course you feel compelled to correct them. Jusy be careful, if they get the move, why obsess about what they call it?
It doesn't really have anything to do with the student. I just thought it was an interesting point of discussion. And since this is an internet discussion forum....
post #68 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by vail snopro View Post
I might guess the primary source of confusion lies in the fact that both weight and pressure tend to be measured using the same unit.
SI unit for mass: Kilogram
SI unit for weight: Newton

Ancient US units: Pound, and Pound-force

SI unit for pressure: Pascal

Various US units include pounds per square inch, where the "pound" implies pound force. Confusing, stupid US units.

Not the same units in any case. This stuff is taught to your typical fourteen year old in the US, and we aren't known for our excellence in science education.
Quote:
But in the context of keeping it simple, I have always had luck using a practical description. "Weight" is generally static, while "pressure" is usually dynamic.
Weight changes with time, ironically enough as things like air pressure change. Apparent weight varies a lot, and lots of people referring to "weight" here are obviously referring to apparent weight, though usually not correctly.
Quote:
Many of the ideals expressed earlier in this thread have merit and I respect them as written, while others are pretty far off the mark and they are what I find comical.
Careful with what you call the kettle.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DEP View Post
Weight is just that -- I have about 125 pounds to work with, and if I put more weight on one foot, there necessarily is less on the other.
Except that if you jump, all of the sudden you have a bunch more than 125 pounds "on" one foot, and then you have none. Let me ask you this: When you are in mid-air, where do you "put" your 125 pounds? Your definition is a broken definition of apparent weight.
Quote:
Pressure seems to imply whatever is pushing against the bottom of my feet. Weight is one component, but also speed, steepness of the slope, amount of edging, etc.
Measuring pressure as a scalar quantity, we will find various pressures at points on your foot, on your bootboard, on your boot sole, along your edge, base. Pressure in this context should be a scalar physical quantity that describes the normal force per unit area, SI unit Pascal. It is most useful in describing why we can't always ski with all of our "weight" (apparent) on one ski. An intuitive understanding of the problems with high pressures applied to soft surfaces is easy to come by, as nearly every human has found a muddy field where they could stand on two feet but started sinking when they stood on one foot. Using pressure in a sense that means "apply force to" is mean-spirited, not everyone reads Ski-Geek-English as their native language.

This is why these silly definitions of weight and pressure straight out of various Four Letter Acronym training materials need to die. They are woefully inadequate, and hey, guess what, science and engineering already came up with an entire lexicon to apply correctly. As an added benefit, the proper meanings of the words are shared worldwide and taught to everyone in school. The prevalence of these asinine definitions in ski instruction shows just how poor the technical underpinnings of the trade are. Excuse me for not referring to it as a profession, but one common aspect of professions is an accurate, sensible, widely shared lexicon.
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post
Weight is variable in a dynamic environment. Especially when we start to talk about lateral acceleration and dynamic motion.
You might as well start talking about dynamic levitation of marsupials for all the sense that makes.
Quote:
There are countless terms but the bottom line is that we are moving our body in such a way that we change how the skis interact with the snow. Which in a shorthanded approach means we are changing our stance to change what the skis will do as they slide across the snow surface. It is the movements we should focus on, not the semantics.
I would agree with you, except as evidenced by just about every thread in this forum, discussion of the movements fails miserably when semantics are misunderstood. Reinventing the wheel with BS terms may be an excellent tactic to Please Make This book Sell or get people to sign up for your Pyramid Scheme Is Awesome training, but it doesn't do jack to further the understanding of skiing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogue skier View Post
I will try not to ramble
Ski on your outside ski. It should get all your weight.
Another broad and incorrect generalization predicated on unclear terminology. Just what we need more of around here.

The really sad thing is that the necessary changes aren't that complicated. Just read the entry for "force" in wikipedia, and click around for a few minutes and read the definitions of related terms.
post #69 of 121
It would be great if you would re-write all of those definitions without the venomous self rightiousness. By the way from my perspective the following two statements are saying the same thing Garrett.

Except that if you jump, all of the sudden you have a bunch more than 125 pounds "on" one foot, and then you have none. Let me ask you this: When you are in mid-air, where do you "put" your 125 pounds?

Weight is variable in a dynamic environment.

That being said I am sure you will find some reason to disagree and insult me for thinking we said the same thing. While I am the first to welcome constructive advice and critique, I do not respect or tolerate people who use their knowledge to disrespect others. It points out for all of your knowledge you severely lack the people skills to make a constructive contribution to this conversation. Which is dissappointing because you have many valid points. Unfortunately they are being overshadowed by all the attitude. Step away from the keyboard, calm down and come back when you learn to play nicer.
post #70 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
Another broad and incorrect generalization predicated on unclear terminology. Just what we need more of around here.
I like simple, weight on the outside ski, both skis do the same thing.
post #71 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post
It would be great if you would re-write all of those definitions without the venomous self rightiousness.
You have had decades to create a precise, sensible, and shared lexicon. It isn't self righteousness, it is frustration with yet another thread where meaningless drivel is passed off as sensible, or even worse, as "better" somehow than correctly applied concepts. I've read enough of it to have some clue what you are saying, but only from lots of experience with the context of ski instructor gobbledygook. And to be clear: my frustration isn't with you in particular, but with all the Four Letter Acronym Disciples who can't be bothered to use terms that make sense. The fact that you took my words as an insult says a lot about your thin skin and inability to admit you might be wrong.
Quote:
Except that if you jump, all of the sudden you have a bunch more than 125 pounds "on" one foot, and then you have none. Let me ask you this: When you are in mid-air, where do you "put" your 125 pounds?

Weight is variable in a dynamic environment.

I was pointing out that the poster's definition of apparent weight leaves something to be desired for describing skiing. Your definition in blue is even more confusing and less concrete. I'd say "wrong", but you seem rather delicate and I assure you it isn't my goal to offend you.

Here we go again, as if these haven't been posted already:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weight
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apparent_weight
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_versus_weight
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Force (read to Modern Physics heading)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pressure (read to Types heading)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normal_force

Again, one of the nice things about these terms is that they are as universal as anything gets and don't suffer much in translation.

There isn't anything so wrong with using "weight" to describe one of the forces on a skier that I can't get over it, but if you simply say "weight" you are being unclear and imprecise. You have to make the reader understand your reference frame and which force you are talking about. Are you talking about the normal force? Are you talking about weight, period, the force directed towards earth's core which accelerates a skier down a hill? Are you talking about the resultant load on the skier which may be considerably more than their "weight" in a turn?

Then it gets more fun. If you haven't explicitly and clearly explained your use of the term "weight" or whatever word you prefer, how on earth is a reader supposed to know what you mean by "unweight"?

If your trade can't come up with a universal and sensible lexicon, you could at the very least post a picture in threads with the forces/terms you describe labeled so the reader has a fighting chance of understanding you.


post #72 of 121
Garrett,
I'm sorry you seem so intent on denegrating all of the people who have taught skiing over the years. Even the scientific community uses imprecise terms, so using that as a reason to discredit others makes no sense. Rage on as much as you want, I refuse to entertain your need to argue about terms that have been used for fifty years.
post #73 of 121
Garrett, is this correct:

Weight refers to the skiers mass and pressure refers to the contact between skis and snow. Shifting weight between the two legs will change the pressure between the two skis and the snow. Leaning forward will also change the pressure distribution but one thing remains the same, mass and total pressure are constant. If we add some forward motion it still does not change a thing because gravity will be pulling exactly as much and our mass is the same and the pressure it creates between skis and snow are also unchanged. Mass and gravity are allways constant. However, pressure change due to upward, downward and sideways motions caused by eather terrain or muscle effort.

Unweighting is indeed a way to vary the pressure between the snow and the skis but the skiers weight remains the same. Thats why we call it skiing.
post #74 of 121
Overuse of technical jargon while teaching may be inefficient. I guess the majority of students do not care about the difference in the terms weight and pressure. In this forum, it may be necessary and acceptable. I like the actual definitions of the terms. They seem clear. Usage here could be described as "pressure is a function of many things, including your own weight". Pressure may be distributed and changed, through forces from a turn, flexing and extending muscles, and rotation of joints.
Jargon aside, to address the initial post (as well as some responses): without reason, movements that redirect the CM (from present location) away from the intended destination IS inefficient.
Specifications for a given situation will dictate "reason". Overall application of excessive force to the outside ski, may be inefficient. Two skis provide a wider base for balance, likely making balancing easier. Two skis will provide increased edge hold over just one. At some point (in a turn) the CM must pass over the outside ski as it moves towards becoming the inside ski, active movements to "maintain" pressure on the inside inside ski may be inefficient.
Application of all movements are dependent on the conditions of the specific circumstance. My advice for the original posted question coincides with someone else's post. Introduce new movements to allow the student to feel different ways to get down the hill. Ultimately, the RIGHT way to ski is what makes keeps skier or boarder continuing snowsports year after year... not whether the they perform to (the instructor's) specs.
post #75 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bryan Davis View Post
...Two skis provide a wider base for balance, likely making balancing easier. Two skis will provide increased edge hold over just one.
Is this true? I can understand two skis provide a wider base for balance. But do two skis hold better than one, as in one - the outside ski during a turn. I am not qualified to say, but when I turn I believe the weight is on the outside ski, the one that counts. The inside ski - what should it be doing? Maybe aiding balance and steering, I don't know, controlling inclination?
post #76 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bryan Davis View Post
Overuse of technical jargon while teaching is inefficient. I guess the majority of students do not care about the difference in the terms weight and pressure.
Losing sight of that is the big problem. Garrett has tried to paint all of us as uneducated and unprofessional because some of the widely used terms don't meet his standards. In reality I agree with his sentiment about clarity but I disagree with the way he puts down the men and women who originally defined those terms. IMO that is the ultimate in unprofessional behavior. Make your point based on it's merit not on denegrating others.
post #77 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post
Garrett,
I'm sorry you seem so intent on denegrating all of the people who have taught skiing over the years. Even the scientific community uses imprecise terms, so using that as a reason to discredit others makes no sense. Rage on as much as you want, I refuse to entertain your need to argue about terms that have been used for fifty years.
In Garrett's defense, while I do not agree with Garrett's posting style, (even though it is somewhat entertaining) the content of the posts is correct.

There is a fundamental misunderstanding of the most basic of terms in ski instruction, in particular weight, pressure and balance, but in general nearly ALL TERMS are used inconsistently. This must be rectified.

It is critical that the instructor actually understand what these terms mean. The consequences of definitions being "left to the instructor" to figure out are that

1) students will not have coherent instruction. Especially if the student knows the difference between weight and pressure but the instructor does not. That's a very bad rock to be put under.
2) the ability to communicate between instructors vanishes completely. We get ridiculous run on threads about "what does is mean to arc?" What is "balance"?

I cannot agree that the scientific community makes use of imprecise language. If I hear "I don't care about the words as long as I get the outcome" one more time, I'm going to scream. Any group that pretends to care about instruction ought to care about the consistency and correctness of their language. It is as simple as that.
post #78 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bryan Davis View Post
Two skis will provide increased edge hold over just one.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
Is this true?
Nope.

Remember: lb/in2

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bryan Davis View Post
Two skis provide a wider base for balance, likely making balancing easier.
My thinking on this is that two skis provide stability (static), but do not necessarily provide balance. In my mind balance (in the dynamic sense) is something different since our CM is often outside of our base of support(well maybe not for everyone, but in good turns it should be). Perhaps merely a definition difference... perhaps not...

Later

Greg
post #79 of 121
Garrett,


You are starting to scare me :.


I can see now why you chose engineering..
post #80 of 121
I signed up for L III exam in 3 weeks at Sugarloaf.

In talking about this with some of our areas directors (a number of whom went to Master's Academy in Dec), they spoke about a discussion with a one of the National Team Members about where you feel the pressure in either foot (or where they feel the pressure coming back at them through the turn).

This particular National Team guy thought about it and said something to the effect of "with the outsidefoot, it comes back at the sole - with the inside foot, it comes on the front cuff".

White Pass inside initiation does not necessarily come with lots of pressure on that inside ski IMO. Really, I found that you can start turning with that femur and "float" into the turn with only slight pressure on that ski (cuff) to get the turn going on while collapsing that leg (making it shorter) and then smoothly loading the outside ski allowing it to "slice" into the snow.

I have bad knees and it hurts my outside tendons really load that inside ski - and the physics of a turn make that the weaker lever.

The inside's the brains, the outside is the brawn.

I have seen alot of people translate starting the turn with the inside ski by loading it to some extent and that also can cause up-and-down (bad-ness).

Keeping that inside ski snow contact, pressure on the cuff (which brings that inside ski back and keeps you stacked up) and pointing that knee is enough to make that ski engage.
post #81 of 121
And by the way...everyone and anyone who cares enough about skiing (their passion) to send in a video or post a question and therefore put themselves out there in a public forum shows a huge personal dedication.

So right-on to you all.

I mean c'mon. We've all got to remind ourselves why the f--k we embrace this sport in the first place - it's distinct LACK of rules and freedom of expression.

Most of these guys who send in a vid are pumped up about charging for the camera and almost all I see are pretty damned good skiers.
post #82 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
I cannot agree that the scientific community makes use of imprecise language. If I hear "I don't care about the words as long as I get the outcome" one more time, I'm going to scream. Any group that pretends to care about instruction ought to care about the consistency and correctness of their language. It is as simple as that.
Excellent post. My posting was a result of that desire to scream you are talking about. Reading the thread before I posted gave me a headache.
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
Nope.

Remember: lb/in2
My thoughts on this, based solely on personal experience:
-On very hard snow, we generate more grip by arranging our body such that most of the load is on one ski, typically the outside one in alpine skiing. I am under the impression this has to do with the mechanism for edge grip on very hard (ice) surfaces.
-As snow becomes sufficiently soft, we can actually generate more "grip" (and by this I mean ultimate lateral force generated in the turn) by spreading the load more evenly (not necessarily or likely 50-50) between the two skis. The opposite of clear ice is fresh powder, and I assure you I get more "grip" by loading both skis fairly evenly.
Quote:
In my mind balance (in the dynamic sense) is something different since our CM is often outside of our base of support(well maybe not for everyone, but in good turns it should be). Perhaps merely a definition difference... perhaps not...
My construction of it would say that most of the time our CM should be inside our "base of support". If it wasn't, we would fall over. The turning forces are such that in a "good" turn, the skis are necessarily out there away from a position that would support us statically, however when things are going well they are very much in a position to balance us. When our skis lose grip and turning forces disappear, suddenly we have a balance problem. The skilled skier makes a small adjustment, regains grip, and picks up where they left off. Or hip checks. This is probably just a minor definition difference.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
Garrett, is this correct:

Weight refers to the skiers mass
IMO, weight should refer to the force acting on the skier's mass due to gravity, which in everyday use is trivially different from what you just said. This force doesn't change in magnitude or direction no matter what the skier does. Here are a couple pics, since I might as well follow my own advice:





Unless they escape Earth orbit and head out into deep space, then you get my definition of this famous term:


Quote:
Mass and gravity are always constant. However, pressure change due to upward, downward and sideways motions caused by either terrain or muscle effort.
Sounds right to me, but what the heck do I know? My main point is that the instructor-folk need to come up with precise, clear terms, or at least draw pictures so someone has a fighting chance of understanding them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fskier View Post
This particular National Team guy thought about it and said something to the effect of "with the outsidefoot, it comes back at the sole - with the inside foot, it comes on the front cuff".
This makes intuitive sense to me for a bunch of reasons.
-The inside ski typically has a considerably smaller load than the outside ski, so the sensation of more pressure on the sole of the foot on the outside ski makes sense.
-The inside ski should describe a shorter arc, so sensing pressure more on the cuff of the boot means that ski is being loaded differently than the outside one, specifically it means a larger proportion of the load is on the shovel than on the outside ski. This should help the ski achieve it's arc despite the overall smaller load and the slightly smaller arc we'd like to see it make.
-This is what I feel when I'm skiing, so I'm biased and would like to think this is the right way for it to feel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LeeX View Post
Garrett, You are starting to scare me :.
Uh oh. Just don't get me started on a technical subject and I'll be fine. Keep big mountains and fresh snow in front of me and you'll never see this kind of thing.
post #83 of 121
Garrett - thanks for your great input. Mass and weight are obviously not the same thing. Weight is mass times gravity and pressure is force per area. Words we can use as we instruct are weight and pressure. Easy for our students to relate to.

Your comment about a more two footed stance in powder is correct. Thats what wider skis are striving for as well, to spread out the pressure over a bigger area.
post #84 of 121
tdk6 is right on with turns in pow.

Essentially your whole ski is now your edge (thus the presence today of skis like the Spatula - reverse camber and sidecut). Weight and pressure is much more evenly distributed, you're lighter on your feet and you don't ever want to "settle-in".

The mechanics of "carving the perfect rail" are made subtle and are now working IN the medium and not ON TOP of it. Skidding and slipping are part of reality and you need a really good feel for when you should give it up into the next turn.

We have been talking a lot about exploiting the "pull" and getting rid of the "push" at the hill. This is the essence of the G-forces you work in pow.

I LOVE it.

One of the other frequent posters has a tag line at the bottom of his threads about "skiing bumps in ice" or something like that - dude...you should get out more.
post #85 of 121
I'm no ski instructor, but I find discussions like this to be pointless. It seems like everyone knows what we're talking about here but there's a lot of quibbling about the exact words to use. We all have two legs and each leg experiences a certain load. That load may be affected by multiple things, but as human beings, we only experience two loads--one from the right and one from the left. As human beings, we can also vary the loads on each leg through multiple means (we can tilt our torso, we can flex our hip/knee, etc). As a student myself, I am interested in two things: 1) how much load should my outside ski be experiencing (relative to my inside ski) at any given point in a turn and 2) how do I achieve that load distribution?

I don't really care that pressure is force/area or weight is mass times G. I'm here to learn skiing, not to obtain a physics degree. Thus, we should be discussing the colloquial usage of the terms rather than the exact physics definitions. Personally, I like the term "weight" instead of the term "pressure." When I stand on one foot, I say that "all my weight is on my right foot." I don't say that "I have increased the pressure on my right sole." So I think we should just get rid of the term pressure and exclusively use the word weight, while keeping in mind that it is being used colloquially.

Personally, I do have the problem of putting excessive weight on my inside ski during the beginning of the turn. I find that sometimes, as I reach the fall line, my outside ski will dart away from me, while my inside ski will continue in a tight-radius carve. So if someone would simply tell me to keep most of the weight on the outside ski while flexing my inside leg (if I am making a left turn, it feels like the inside edge of the left ski is "scraping" the medial aspect of my right heel/leg), then that would be a lot more helpful than arguing over the physics definitions of "weight" and "pressure."

Just some thoughts from the perspective of a student, and not an instructor.
post #86 of 121
Totally agree!!
post #87 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrzinwin View Post
I'm no ski instructor, but I find discussions like this to be pointless. It seems like everyone knows what we're talking about here but there's a lot of quibbling about the exact words to use. We all have two legs and each leg experiences a certain load. That load may be affected by multiple things, but as human beings, we only experience two loads--one from the right and one from the left. As human beings, we can also vary the loads on each leg through multiple means (we can tilt our torso, we can flex our hip/knee, etc). As a student myself, I am interested in two things: 1) how much load should my outside ski be experiencing (relative to my inside ski) at any given point in a turn and 2) how do I achieve that load distribution?
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrzinwin View Post

Personally, I do have the problem of putting excessive weight on my inside ski during the beginning of the turn. I find that sometimes, as I reach the fall line, my outside ski will dart away from me, while my inside ski will continue in a tight-radius carve. So if someone would simply tell me to keep most of the weight on the outside ski while flexing my inside leg (if I am making a left turn, it feels like the inside edge of the left ski is "scraping" the medial aspect of my right heel/leg), then that would be a lot more helpful than arguing over the physics definitions of "weight" and "pressure."

Just some thoughts from the perspective of a student, and not an instructor.
Thanks for that insight! Ever been around college professors in a group discussion on the merits of _____? I have, and it's interesting and similar. Well, we have a group of "Professors of Skiing" here. Articulate, knowledgeable, and passionate!

This thread and types like it, maybe should be limited to an "Instructors Only" forum, so us "students" don't fill our heads with confusing detail. I'm an engineer, and it is my achilles heel in golf.....too many mechanical details to process in that 1.5 second swing.

BTW, I hope someone answers the second part of your post!
post #88 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrzinwin View Post
Personally, I do have the problem of putting excessive weight on my inside ski during the beginning of the turn. I find that sometimes, as I reach the fall line, my outside ski will dart away from me, while my inside ski will continue in a tight-radius carve. So if someone would simply tell me to keep most of the weight on the outside ski while flexing my inside leg (if I am making a left turn, it feels like the inside edge of the left ski is "scraping" the medial aspect of my right heel/leg), then that would be a lot more helpful than arguing over the physics definitions of "weight" and "pressure."
Simply keep most of the weight on the outside ski while flexing your inside leg . Short leg/long leg. Remember to bend sideways at your waist (angulation) and counter as well (turn your upper body slightly outwards in the turn). The reason you are ending up on your inside ski is because you are not balanced correctly over your outside ski.
post #89 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrzinwin View Post
...So if someone would simply tell me to keep most of the weight on the outside ski while flexing my inside leg ... then that would be a lot more helpful...

Just some thoughts from the perspective of a student, and not an instructor.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
Simply keep most of the weight on the outside ski while flexing your inside leg
Cool, I didn't know they have Guest Centered Teaching in Finland too
post #90 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by cgeib View Post
Cool, I didn't know they have Guest Centered Teaching in Finland too
LOL
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