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Strolz boots

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Does anybody have any experience with a Strolz shop in the Northeast? How about the shop in Hampton, NH (www.strolzboots.com)?
How does their service compare to Strolz in Lech?

Thanks!
post #2 of 16
I doubt you get champagne on silver trays like you do in Lech.
post #3 of 16
My sister has some of the hardest to fit feet on earth. She got some good boots that work for her at the NH shop. They cost the same as a nice trip to Lech.

I doubt the boots are cheap in Lech either.
post #4 of 16
Strand's Ski Shop in Worcester, MA (www.strandsskishop.com) is also a Strolz retailer. Also no champagne, but they know what they're doing.
post #5 of 16
Tim (The bootfitter at the shop NH) has been there now for a couple of years and foamed hundreds of boots, he trained in Austria for a couple months before starting so you will get just as good of a custom boot from him as you would for going to Austria. He actually is foaming out of two shops right now (one in North Conway, NH by appointment only). The shop in Hampton is also the distributor for North America so they have a massive inventory compared to the rest of the shops in the US.

PS- The nephew of Hannes Strolz is working out of the same shop this season too. (Hannes Strolz is in charge of the section of the Strolz company that designs and produces the boots.)
post #6 of 16
I'm a firm believer in equipment being a personal preference. What really works for one of us may not work for another, etc. So I'm not one to dump on any product. About 5 years ago, I decided that perhaps it was time to give up plug race boots. I decided to have a pair of Stroltz boots made. The liner, in particular was just a thing of beauty. However, I never liked how I skied in them. I fiddled with them, with quite a bit of professional tech help {and a fair amount of personal experience doing this. I never got them dialed in. I also had a hard time dealing with the huge volume of the boots, etc. They just were not for me. And, given the foam liner, there was very little market for a used Stroltz boot. I paid $1000+ with the footbeds, and I sold the boots, with about 10 partial days of use for $100 to somebody with a very similar foor shape.

My only advice is to do your homework and to be as sure as you can that it's the boot for you. Expensive exercise for me. By the way, I'm the only person that I know who hasn't loved them. I had skied in Langes, forever. Now I ski in a Dobie and stand around in a Nordica AT coach's boot. Best of both worlds for me.
post #7 of 16
I had a pair of Strolz FSX-Ts(Favorit) made for me 20 years ago because I have a very wide forefoot and had trouble finding a performance boot that would fit me at the time. I loved the way the boot skied but the problem was that the darn plastic buckles would break everytime I went skiing! The cost of the boots and orthotic was around $500.00. That model Strolz is still made today with a slight buckle change. It still looks like the buckles could break but I would assume they are fixed. I remember walking out of the dealer's store with handfulls of plastic buckles. I would often use duct tape to hold the shell together for the day! I have actually been thinking about trying them again because the heel hold and snug fit was phenomenal for me!
post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 
Well...
The NH store could not foam my boots when I needed (wanted) them. Ended up going to Strand's. Chose the lower level shell for boot volume. Finally a tight and comfortable fit although the shell is soft.
I had to get a new liner last april after problems with the initial liner. The foam became soft, packing out in a single run and then getting tight again on the lift. Leif at Strand's redid the liner for free without hesitation.
Overall happy other than the soft flex and annoying buckles.
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by kawo View Post
Well...
The NH store could not foam my boots when I needed (wanted) them. Ended up going to Strand's. Chose the lower level shell for boot volume. Finally a tight and comfortable fit although the shell is soft.
I had to get a new liner last april after problems with the initial liner. The foam became soft, packing out in a single run and then getting tight again on the lift. Leif at Strand's redid the liner for free without hesitation.
Overall happy other than the soft flex and annoying buckles.
Kawo,
Can't you change the flex using the using the piston device on the back of the cuff? Also, you mention the buckles still suck. True?
post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 
That thing in the back is the walk/ski device, I think. Will investigate.
The buckles are plain impractical. The sliding mechanism shifts every time you unbuckle, you can't just keep the buckles set for the next day.
Did I mention the boots are really cold? I now wear BootGlove.
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muleski View Post
I'm a firm believer in equipment being a personal preference. What really works for one of us may not work for another, etc. So I'm not one to dump on any product. About 5 years ago, I decided that perhaps it was time to give up plug race boots. I decided to have a pair of Stroltz boots made. The liner, in particular was just a thing of beauty. However, I never liked how I skied in them. I fiddled with them, with quite a bit of professional tech help {and a fair amount of personal experience doing this. I never got them dialed in. I also had a hard time dealing with the huge volume of the boots, etc. They just were not for me. And, given the foam liner, there was very little market for a used Stroltz boot. I paid $1000+ with the footbeds, and I sold the boots, with about 10 partial days of use for $100 to somebody with a very similar foor shape.

My only advice is to do your homework and to be as sure as you can that it's the boot for you. Expensive exercise for me. By the way, I'm the only person that I know who hasn't loved them. I had skied in Langes, forever. Now I ski in a Dobie and stand around in a Nordica AT coach's boot. Best of both worlds for me.
My story is almost exactly like Muleski's except that I skied them for almost two seasons, and still own them. Anyone want a pair cheap?

Now I'm in a pair of Technicas that are warmer and more comfortable. And they fit my duck paddle of a foot equally as well. They cost a lot less as well.

Mike
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by ctskierguy View Post

Now I'm in a pair of Technicas that are warmer and more comfortable. And they fit my duck paddle of a foot equally as well. They cost a lot less as well.

Mike
I too have the "duck paddle" and Salomon X-Wave 10s have worked for me. I hesitate to shell out(pardon the pun) a grand for a pair of boots that may not meet my current expectations. I am looking at getting a pair of Impact 10s to replace the venerable X-Wave. The beauty is that you can buy 2-3 pairs of boots for what a pair of Strolz's cost. If you really don't like something you can sell it to recoup some of your losses.
post #13 of 16
I had problems with the buckle system, for sure. The comment about having to fiddle with them once you unbuckle is right on the money. Mine were, I guess as close to a race boot shell as they make. They didn't have the piston on the rear spine. I thought they were "OK" in the cold, and comfort wasn't an issue. The basic stance, and the ramp angle didn't do it for me, and they were just too soft a flex. I was concerned when I bought them, inside, in the early fall, and was told that the shell material would harden tremendously at about 30F. I never noticed that. I tried about six different bootboard setups {got them from Strand's and planed them}, tried a couple of things to stiffen them, etc. I just couldn't get them dialed in for me. The alignment was fine, as I got that right during the fitting. I also had a number of friends ask me what "had happened" to my skiing, which was interesting. I know a lot of people who love them, but I couldn't make them work.

Because of that, and the VERY good comment that there's simply no market for them, even lightly used, I have had a hard time suggesting to friends that they "try" them. Trying them is a $1K experiment. So if you have the $1K to gamble with, maybe. Thinking more about this, I don't know anybody who's moved from current race boots to a Strolz.

The leather foam liner is beautiful. Evidently, for quite a while a number of WC skiers used a Stroltz liner in their non-Stroltz boots at one time, and perhaps still do. Before his bike accident, there were podium pictures of Herman Maier with a leather liner in his carbon fibre or kevlar {or whatever they were}Lange's. I've been told that it was a Stroltz liner...with a lower volume than normal. I've also been told that he and his tech were ordered to get a "normal" Lange over his shoulder for the pics! Same deal with Eberharter. I looked into have a Stroltz liner foamed for a couple of race boots, but it was too problematic.

I just feel it's important to be confident that these are the right boot, before getting them built. If they work, awesome.
post #14 of 16
Quote:
That thing in the back is the walk/ski device, I think. Will investigate.
You can swap out the piston/spring for a stiffer or softer one, as well. Whoever sold you the boots should be able to get the parts. I haven't messed with it, but it should stiffen the forward flex somewhat.

Quote:
The buckles are plain impractical. The sliding mechanism shifts every time you unbuckle, you can't just keep the buckles set for the next day.
It is a quirky design. I think they work well once you have them on, but it always takes me a couple runs to get it dialed in. If you take your boots off at lunch it could be a pain.

Quote:
Did I mention the boots are really cold? I now wear BootGlove.
I didn't notice them being much different from my old boots (really old Alpinas), but there isn't much for me to compare to. I have huge feet (US mens size 17), and the Strolz Favorit shells are some of the only ones that I can get my foot into.

I actually have a pair *without* a foamed liner (from Strand's)... I have noticed they're on the soft side. Maybe I'll go back for a foamed liner next season if I don't change my mind in the next couple months. I was told they're noticeably stiffer after they've been foamed.

Unless you're really hard to fit, you can probably do just as well in a cheaper boot. If you ARE hard to fit, or have huge feet... could be worth it. Not sure if it would be any better than any other shell once fitted with custom footbeds and an aftermarket heat-molded liner.
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muleski View Post
I've also been told that he and his tech were ordered to get a "normal" Lange over his shoulder for the pics! Same deal with Eberharter. .
I've seen that in action. Quick, switch the gear, whisper to the 2nd and 3rd place athlete on the podium "make sure the skis and boots are between you and the top step at all times".
post #16 of 16
I tried a TON of boots for wide feet. Some felt OK in the shop. Skiing was another matter. I would have to ski in intense pain till my feet went to sleep, then I could enjoy skiing (though my skiing was not as good in this state as I could not feel the terrain with my feet).

Strolz is the ONLY boot that can fit my 4E duck feet. Not all the other so-called "Large volume" boots. None worked. I have owned mine for 8 years, and will probably see what is available now, but if they don't feel PERFECT in the shop, I will return to Strolz.

I was SO Sick of hearing how "This boot is really wide" only to feel that familiar pain again.

I am very happy with my Strolz (from Strand's) from the beginning. Never a problem. I won't tolerate ill fitting boots ever again. If I do try something else, it will come with a money back guarantee. And I will use it if the new boots are not the equal of Strolz.

I won't throw good money at a bad product.


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