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automatic ski waxing system

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hey,
I've been reading these forums forever and its my first time posting. I'm an engineering student, and for my senior design project I'm planning on working with a group on an automatic ski waxing system. A portable unit that can move up and down on the rails laying down hot wax and then scraping it off and brushing the base automatically. Does anyone know of a good unit to look at for ideas?
I posted this last night in the gear forum, and was redirected here.
Any help from you guys would be REALLY appreciated.
Thanks
post #2 of 11
An inexpensive version that only did the hot wax application was done by Hertel Wax. It did not scrape or do any brushing.

I have seen the on the mountian tents that do an instant tune of the skis. Seems to me they use a liquid wax and a single machine. It does not seem to last as long as a ironed in or heated hot waxing, but better than nothing on the bottom of the boards.

Of course if the market is for a ski shop head over to Wintersteiger's web site and a few others (Montana and a few others) they have the high end shop machines that are used in the back of the tuning shops.
post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
I've actually looked at the Hertel machines (Terry Hertel was nice enough to respond to me - pretty quickly, with some advice. He suggested friction waxing, and I have to weigh the benefits of iron vs friction) but the challenge that I'm interested in is to make a portable machine that can clip onto a ski and do the job. I'm thinking in terms of the racers on my schools team that need a real performance wax job (multiple melting passes to simulate hotboxing, and 4-10 hours of drying before scraping) that they can run semi-unattended in their dorms and have ready to race in the morning. Laying down the wax is the easier part of that process. I've looked at the pro machine processes, but getting something that can do the whole job and not take up much space is going to be... interesting, to say the least.
post #4 of 11
I remember seeing a company that laid down the wax in a sheet or film form on the base then applied heat to soak it in. That was at the SIA about 4 years ago.
post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor D View Post
I remember seeing a company that laid down the wax in a sheet or film form on the base then applied heat to soak it in. That was at the SIA about 4 years ago.
That would be this company: http://www.skinswax.com/skins.html
post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
This skinswax system is pretty interesting. It seems like a system targeted at a shop though. I don't know how expensive it is, but I saw the number $3000 somewhere... I'm thinking a portable system that would be affordable for home waxing, but this roll on idea looks like it could be useful. Has anyone actually used this system?
post #7 of 11
Check out the IR waxer from Montana as well. I've never used one, but i thought it was an interesting change of pace from the usual friction waxer.
post #8 of 11
My Wintersteiger catalog has a "thermo-jomax" listed as a portable hot box that can be rolled up after use. It is some kind of thin bag that you plug in and then sandwich it between 2 ski bases and clamp it all together. Listed as a US Ski Team item.
post #9 of 11

Most of the major ski areas in Europe...

...already have them. You pay your money, ski into an enclosure, and onto a conveyor belt, and presto..you're out the other end, and your skis are waxed...
post #10 of 11
yea roll on wax seems to be the way to go, not very much excess to scrape, also very quick. Sounds like a very good idea for a senior design project, im a few years below you in engineering but i love hearing about this kind of stuff. Good luck on your project
post #11 of 11
Looked at that, but basically it just lays it on.  Sure maybe it sits there a while, but they "squeegee" it off, which sort of implies it's still pliable at that point, which is why there is no scraping.  So, it's not sinking in that long.  And, how about brushing?  The pores are presumably still all clogged with wax.  Fine for winter, maybe, but what happens when spring hits?  Sounds like a recipe for disaster.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blizzboy283 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor D View Post
I remember seeing a company that laid down the wax in a sheet or film form on the base then applied heat to soak it in. That was at the SIA about 4 years ago.
That would be this company: http://www.skinswax.com/skins.html
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