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Balance preference slowing me down?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
skier: eastern
terrain doing exercise: green/blue/steeper blue groomers
m/130lb 5'5" level 7-8 experience
skis: dyna's omeglass race stock SL 155cm


playing around yesterday with mass movement, I'm slowly undoing the slight up and pivot movement pattern(speed control occuring after fall line) and building a movement pattern which involves CM moving forward-lateral and speed control occuring higher up (boot flexing yadda yadda).

im left dominant and naturally, one legged (both skis on snow but actively engaging inside edge just before entering the fall line thru transition) is fine, almost natural on my left leg but it just doesn't happen with my right.
It's almost like im getting restricted by my boot. I realized (starting off in the morning) that for a split instance during the turn, I was a little back on the ski as the front got all squirrely on me but even after that correction, I can't seem to engage that inside right edge. I almost always had to revert back to getting the majority of my balance back on the outside ski. Alignment that was off a bit was fixed prior to this season so that shouldn't be an issue. What should I do/ can I do to fix this.
(as an aside)
A few colleagues (LII/III's) MA'd me early jan and again naturally found my left turns having better 'mass movement' involved with them than my right, which (in their words) "sort of ended prematurely". I couldn't get any video up so unfortunately this is gonna have to be a text only Dx.
post #2 of 14
Can you get a couple of pics of your skiing as you transition from one turn to the next?
post #3 of 14
I'm thinking,moving/pointing that right Hip into the turn at the end of the transition.
post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/7974001...42242/sizes/o/


not a great example, can't see the feet too well, maybe you MA guru's will decipher for me, one thing I see is a slight A frame on that turn.....but that's a few steps ahead of a fundamental I'm trying to correct as per my orig post....
post #5 of 14
Quote:
I almost always had to revert back to getting the majority of my balance back on the outside ski.
Let me get this straight. Your goal is to enter each turn with dominant pressure on your new inside ski?
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
for the 1 footed drill...yes..
for my overall skiing, no, im all for perfecting a 2 footed technique....

basically, right foot dominant drills are a problem for me....the one i described, javelin turns, white pass turns...
post #7 of 14
Can you describe the drill you were attempting to do?

What is the problem with Javelin turns? Are they not outside ski dominant?

Whitepass turns sound like they'd be an issue, but first decribe the unnamed drill you were trying to do.

Your collegues don't seem to have offered you much help...

Later

Greg
post #8 of 14
Mak, the pix is of preparation for a turn to the right, right? And this is the turn where you are having difficulty engaging the right edge of the right ski, and your left leg wants to carry all the load, right?

If you look at where you're aiming your pole touch in the pix, it's in a position to block your center of mass from moving into the turn. You also are already aiming your left knee toward the right in a manner that indicates to me you are about to launch into the right turn by extending the left leg.

I'd try two things as exercises: Make double pole plants and make sure any extending is done with both legs. Feel the bottoms of both feet as you start each turn.
post #9 of 14
The left half of your body is engaged in balancing. The right half is out of whack. The right leg is totally extended but the weight is on the left leg. I have a suspicion that as left side dominate as you are there is probably a muscle imbalance going on as well. Do you know a PT who does muscle balancing? Lisa Marie are you out there?
post #10 of 14
I have a very similar problem (only my right leg is dominant).
My turns to the left (i.e. when the outside ski is the right one) feel very stable. When I turn right, especially on flatter slopes, it seems like I am out of balance, and sort of ride the tail of the left ski a little bit. I think I might also be doing something along the lines of keeping some weight on the inside ski (right one) when I turn right , and the reason for that is that I find it hard to shift my weight on the left leg properly forward, and get the appropriate edge angle-- I seem to get too much edge on the outside left ski, making those turns bad.

This could be an alignment issue, since when I ski on one ski on a flat slope it seems hard to keep balance on my left leg and I pressure the inside edge of the left ski too much, causing it to turn right.


This left/right imbalance must be a recurring problem for many people. Do you have any tips on how to achieve symmetry (in addition to training/flexibility etc.) ?
post #11 of 14
Most parallel skiers who sense a difference in ease of turn initiation have a problem with allowing the hips to move into the more awkward turn.

Addressing this issue takes a lot of patience and willingness to spend some time doing so.

You need first to become totally familiar with being centered on your skis through things like stepping around on the flats, looking for evidence you can pick up the skis level to the snow; making shallow traverses on very gentle terrain where you ride the edges to a stop and then back up in the same tracks; making small steps into and through turns on easy slopes, etc.

Then you need mileage and mileage gliding on gradual hills with equally weighted skis, slowly sliding the inside hip forward and into a position to engage the edges until turning occurs, while being sure to square up the pelvis at the point between turns of having the skis flat on the slope and to keep the torso upright.
post #12 of 14
Makwendo99,

From the picture, I have to ask if someone told you at some point that you should always face down the hill?? This is a classic position of some one that is trying to do that. Your right hip is behind your foot, your ski is loosing it's edge engagement, your left foot is too far ahead and from there, your only option to turn is to shove your self off the inside edge of your right ski with the left ski stemming.

Follow the direction of your skis more, that could be a simple solution for you.

RW
post #13 of 14
One way to help become more aware of moving your Hips into a turn and to stay balanced is to find a side hill. Traverse and try to start your carve very early above the fall line. The upside down turn. If you are imbalanced because of issues (Hips,ect.) you will find it hard to start your turn. Yes you will fall over too. But with sometime you will also figure out about moving your CoM into the turn. The goes on. Hope this helps.
post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron White View Post
Makwendo99,

From the picture, I have to ask if someone told you at some point that you should always face down the hill?? This is a classic position of some one that is trying to do that. Your right hip is behind your foot, your ski is loosing it's edge engagement, your left foot is too far ahead and from there, your only option to turn is to shove your self off the inside edge of your right ski with the left ski stemming.

Follow the direction of your skis more, that could be a simple solution for you.

RW
Ron, yes and no...this picture was taken pre-alignment last year so im (at least I don't feel) as bad as what the picture shows; however, I do maintain a countered stance/ move down the hill facing down it. I'll take your suggestion of following the ski more and work with that next time I'm out on the hill. (My on the hill days this year took a serious drop since I started med school).

As an aside, I skied a good part of last season with a CSIA examiner from whistler and picked up some good (or bad) habits depending on where you come from. My stance is very CSIA like, with a somewhat rounded back, among other things. I was working to remedy those back to PSIA 'standard' earlier this season.

everyone else, thanks for the input, will give an update once i get on snow...and when the weather actually gets better from this 50 degree bs.
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