EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › How long should boots last?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How long should boots last?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Toward the end of last season, and certainly this season, I've noticed that my once wonderful boots are starting to "fail" me. What was once a glove-like fit is now very sloppy. The liners are noticeably packed out, and the shell is stiffer than I remember it. I've had some tweaking done to snug them up a bit, but they just don't feel the same. Maybe it's just me, but boots seem like such a personal & integral item, and I hate the thought of ditching my dear old Salomons. However, it's becoming an issue w.r.t. my technique, so I feel like I have to move on. I've certainly gotten my money's worth. :
post #2 of 25
I have at least 500 days on my current Lange L10's. I've just recently had to readjust the micro adjustment of the buckles to take up a bit of slop. I've had a couple pairs of Langes become unuseable after maybe 200 days (two seasons).

I'm fairly careful of boots. I don't scuff the bottoms on hard surfaces, I always close the buckles when not in use and I put them on a dryer rack every overnight. One thing that helps, I think, is that I put the boots on in the morning and don't take them off until I quit for the day. I see folks taking their boots off every time they go in to warm up or eat lunch. That's extra stress on the liners.
post #3 of 25
Also depends on your and family and friend's odor tolerance (;->). Besides... Custom insoles should get you some additional mileage.
Good advise by Kneale. I never take my boots off or even unbuckle for anything until I'm back in the lot. Didn't ever realize that good be good to extend boot's life. On top of being careful walking around, you can get rubber/plastic protectors to protect from scuff the bottoms on hard surfaces. Or (in case of Atomic's 2001 and later) rely on parts replacement of the "interface", which are the heal and toe pieces of sole which consists of three individual pieces.
post #4 of 25
I've heard an average of 150 times on the hill.

More than 150, if you're a lightweight finesse skier and prefer easy trails, less if you're an aggressive heavyweight and have a bone to pick with the black diamonds...

Also was told that a custom footbed will go and average of 300 times -- so it'll be good for two sets of boots.
post #5 of 25
Thread Starter 
I guess I'd have to describe myself as a fairly aggressive heavyweight (230 lbs), and I'm definitely over 150 days. I do take care of my boots (keep them on all day, buckled when not used, etc.), but they just don't feel right anymore. It could also be that I've improved so much the past few years that I'm actually noticing the changes (I took 12 years off from skiing), whereas before I just wasn't paying attention. I've toyed w/ the idea of custom footbeds (got them for my wife because her feet always hurt), which may be a reasonable quick fix until I talk myself into new boots.
post #6 of 25
I tend to keep boots for a long, long time. I only get to ski about 5-10 times a year. I'm older with 5 others to equip. My current pair are about 11 yrs old. The pair I had before them lasted 15 yrs (with about 3x greater frequency of use). If there has been any growing looseness I've been able to deal with it by tightening the buckles and extra notch. What ends the life of my boots is stress cracks in the outer shell. I've got several on each boot now which mean this is the last season for my current pair. I've seen other old boots literally turn to dust at about the 12-15 yr point. The plastic turns as brittle as dried clay. One day I was skiing with a friend. It was our second or third run and he hadn't skied in some time. Each of his boots started to break into multiple parts around the upper buckles and foot bed. When he walked to the rental shop for new eqmt to finish out the day, he had to take care not to get his socks wet.
post #7 of 25
If you want to keep the boot look at the Zipfit liner, which is much more comfortable than the moulded style liners and will last for many years. Look up Steve Bagely in the Master Bootfitter index on this site and give him a call.

I ski on old Lange's with Zipfit liners and I am very happy with the system.

But you need to really inventory your boots to see if they are damaged or in any way compromised before you decide to go the new liner route. Lange's have always used very durable plastics. Rossi on the other hand has not and so my wife's boots fell apart after about 8 years.

Mark
post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by jamesj:
My current pair are about 11 yrs old.
Odd. Surefoot tells me the average lifespan of a ski boot is 5 years...

My wife has a pair of lightly used Surefoot Nordicas that have never fit her well, and wanted to give DaleBoot a try. If she does, despite a satisfaction guarantee that states, "...if you are ever dissatisfied with any Surefoot product or service, we will repair it, replace it, or refund your money at your discretion. ...No dislcaimers. No fine print." -- she will have to accept a pro-rated (unstated) refund on her 6 year old boots. As a result, we're going to Surefoot Manhattan Friday to get them replaced or fight for that refund.

So, the answer to the original post is obviously: five years. Right?

[ March 03, 2004, 11:39 AM: Message edited by: Aaron ]
post #9 of 25
I got about 200 days on my Tecnica Icon Carbons, and was suddenly swimming in them. I was going to get new liners, but the shells started cracking across the top of the foot. I considered trying to warranty them, but found that the new Salomon Women's X-Wave 9's fit me better so I just switched.
post #10 of 25
I've got between 150 and 200 days on my 15 year old Lange TII's. They fit me great and seem to be holding up so I have no immediate plans to replace them. I think liners deteriorate much faster if you're skiing every day. The main problem I have with them is people coming up and saying things like, "Man you are old school." or, "I used to have a pair of those back in the day."
post #11 of 25
PerSwede, If your asking, your ready for new boots. Next time your up north go into one of the better shops and talk with there boot fitter. Where do you normally ski ? May be we can recommemd someone. There are only a few people in New England that I would trust to put me in the correct boot.
post #12 of 25
Uh. .. . I don't know about the rest of everyone here (and you should certainly post in the gear section too) but I pulled out an old pair of Doli's (mid 80's models) and found them more responsive and comfortable than the Next 9's I've been on for the last 5 years. So much so in fact that I'm actually thinking of repairing some damage (worn heel plate and stripped micro-adjust) and having a custom insert made.

Anyone think I'm crazy???
post #13 of 25
Thread Starter 
Custom footbeds may help a bit, but I seem to have a lot of lateral movement (i.e. side to side). Heel lifter & canting adjustments at the beginning of the season helped a bit, but I'm really leaning towards new boots.

If I was confident about the fitting advice from some of the local stores, I'd try to pick up a new pair during the late-season sales & have them fine tuned up in VT. However, I'm not convinced they have the desired expertise.

Max Capacity,
I ski mostly Southern VT (this year just Stratton), and have had some work done by Green Mountain Orthotic Lab (the place located right by the base lodge). What other places would you recommend?
post #14 of 25
This really depends on a number of variables. A stiff boot will last longer, since it is flexed less comparatively. Similar to metal, if you keep bending it, it will eventually become weak and then fail. Plastic does that too. The foam in the liner eventually packs out, and never returns to normal aeration. The thinner the liner, the less foam to pack out, the longer they last.

My full-on race boots don't lose their fit properties, but end up wearing out at the pivots of the cuff/shell. The constant stress of the metal nut/bolt/cuff alignment mechanism against the plastic ovalizes the hole.
post #15 of 25
The guy who screwed up my liners put a bunch of material on the outside, it looked like rubber sheeting. He put the liner back in the shell, and now it feels snug again.

He didn't seem to know of a way to return the aeration to the liner - and the boots have only been skied 4 times. The were brand new, in the box, 3 weeks ago.

I guess that once the liner stuff is compressed to a certain point, all you can do is add onto it, not fluff it up again, even when the material is new.

Green Mountain told me they're all sold out of replacement liners.

Startinggate (near Stratton, and recommended by someone on this list) said they have some kind of 'injectable foam' liner they make in the store.

I've decided to wait until next season, when shops will have all of their different liners in stock.
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by BetaRacer:

My full-on race boots don't lose their fit properties, but end up wearing out at the pivots of the cuff/shell. The constant stress of the metal nut/bolt/cuff alignment mechanism against the plastic ovalizes the hole.
Does this have a specific 'feel' or do you observe it visually?
post #17 of 25
Feel. There just isn't the precision laterally. Really noticable when switching to new boots.
post #18 of 25
Thread Starter 
Beta,
You going to be around in mid-April out in Whistler?
post #19 of 25
PerSwede,

Since you mentioned you have been to Green Mountain Ortho labs, were you happy with their service? My recommendation would be to go back there. Greg is probably one of the best (one of the founders of masterfit) and when I talk with him, ask advice, it always seems to be very straigt forward and honest. He's very laid back as a person so very easy to work with. If I were able to go back on a regular basis, That would be my fitter of choice. For his quality of work, the price he charges would be worth it.

The price of travel for me would be a little steep however.
post #20 of 25
Swede, I have no plans to be elsewhere. Therefore I should be in Whistler mid-April
post #21 of 25
Thread Starter 
dchan-
I'd been procrastinating about getting my boots checked because I didn't want to take the time away from skiing. Finally, it got to be too much. Went into GMOL, & Dan (I think) spent over an hour checking my alignment & fit. Put in a heel lift. It was too much, & they reduced it. Charged me a grand total of $17!

My wife was always uncomfortable in her boots, & watching her ski, I could tell she was struggling with her boots/alignment. Took her over to GMOL. Greg fitted her for custom footbeds. He was great. Very laid back, & took the time to listen to me, and more importantly, her. Now, her pain seems gone, & it's not as much of an ordeal to get her out on the slopes.

I'm on the fence about whether to go the "all new boots" route, or whether to try a replacement liner (ie. zipfit). I'm a gear junkie, & would like nothing more than to have a new pair of boots to play with. However, w/ 4 kids, I have to keep equipment spending in mind. If I was confident I could get sized & "branded" properly around here, I'd try to get a new pair on sale & take it up to GMOL to get fitted. Maybe I'll just bite the bullet & pay up for the full monty.
post #22 of 25
Thread Starter 
dchan-
I'd been procrastinating about getting my boots checked because I didn't want to take the time away from skiing. Finally, it got to be too much. Went into GMOL, & Dan (I think) spent over an hour checking my alignment & fit. Put in a heel lift. It was too much, & they reduced it. Charged me a grand total of $17!

My wife was always uncomfortable in her boots, & watching her ski, I could tell she was struggling with her boots/alignment. Took her over to GMOL. Greg fitted her for custom footbeds. He was great. Very laid back, & took the time to listen to me, and more importantly, her. Now, her pain seems gone, & it's not as much of an ordeal to get her out on the slopes.

I'm on the fence about whether to go the "all new boots" route, or whether to try a replacement liner (ie. zipfit). I'm a gear junkie, & would like nothing more than to have a new pair of boots to play with. However, w/ 4 kids, I have to keep equipment spending in mind. If I was confident I could get sized & "branded" properly around here, I'd try to get a new pair on sale & take it up to GMOL to get fitted. Maybe I'll just bite the bullet & pay up for the full monty.
post #23 of 25
Thread Starter 
Beta Racer
Based on your tag line & local"hill", I'm sure you can ski circles around me. However, I'd love to meet a Bear in person, so at least allow me to offer to buy you a beer or two. Any advice on how best to spend 2 & 1/2 days at WB would be priceless (see my separate thread in "resorts")
post #24 of 25
I think the issue of boot fatigue is a function of a majority of three variables, not in any particular order:

1) Type of plastic used. For example, the current Lange 120 use different shell material compared to the Technica XT 17.

2) Number of days skied.

3) Total amount of time that has expired since purchase. Some boots like just self-destruct over time (like some Rossignol boots) irregardless of how many times they have been used on the slopes.

As a side note, I've noticed my inner boots pack-out considerably after only one season with alot of wear around the upper part of inner boot, externally where contact is made with(or without in my case) the hard shell spoiler. Depending on the inner liner material, one season starts alot of piling (small balls)of inner boot material. However, this "wear and tear" could be aggravated by me taking the inner boot and custom insoles out of my shells after everyday of skiing.

PerSwede, don't feel bad about having to buy new boots...after one season, I am going eat my words, and buy stiffer Technica XT24, that were originally suggested to me by the shop owner...I thought the XT17 were stiff enough, (frankly speaking the 24s were a bitch to get out of AT THE SHOP, at room temperature) sigh...
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by Kneale Brownson:
I have at least 500 days on my current Lange L10's. I've just recently had to readjust the micro adjustment of the buckles to take up a bit of slop. I've had a couple pairs of Langes become unuseable after maybe 200 days (two seasons).

I'm fairly careful of boots. I don't scuff the bottoms on hard surfaces, I always close the buckles when not in use and I put them on a dryer rack every overnight. One thing that helps, I think, is that I put the boots on in the morning and don't take them off until I quit for the day. I see folks taking their boots off every time they go in to warm up or eat lunch. That's extra stress on the liners.
Wouln't that denote the fact that the boots don't fit properly in the first place? Before I got my XWave 8's, I always took my boots off in the lodge due to excruciating pain. Even standing in the lift corral was unbearable
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › How long should boots last?