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How do you make green runs fun / challenging?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Hi folks!

So you're skiing with one of your never-ever (or nearly so) friends for the day on the green runs. Bailing on them wouldn't be nice. How do you have fun and/or challenge yourself on the run? Any specific drills you like on greens that help you at your high ability level?

Some ideas: Ski switch; one foot; switch to a snowboard...

Remember - anything goes!
post #2 of 29
Get twin tips and learn to ski backwards, or pick a resort with a terrain park in the green zone, and teach yourself the value of a good massage therapist.
post #3 of 29
Don't turn.
post #4 of 29
Spinning 360's. railroad tracks. One ski.

Those come to mind right away.

Rob
post #5 of 29
Try skiing in between the line of first-time lesson takers and try to avoid hitting any. Makes for good fun and practice!!
post #6 of 29
Skiing the whole thing on one foot (either the same foot or using just your inside foot) is always "fun".

See how slowly you can ski while still maintaining good form -- i.e., no stem-turns! Doing a cross-over / under move while you're barely moving will test your skills.

Various side-slipping drills -- falling leaf, pivot slips, etc. are always "fun".

Play the role of "guide" -- i.e., have your friend stay in your tracks, introduce them to the concept of "steering back uphill to slow down". It forces you to ski the "slow line" at your friend's speed, and it teaches your friend (subconsciously) how to ski without having the brakes on.
post #7 of 29
Learn ski ballet
That's what I do in those circumstances.
(That ain't me, BTW)
post #8 of 29
How many friends? Human slalom anybody? Or is that now a no no?
post #9 of 29
I spend a fair bit of time on the green runs teaching, and I probably ski backwards a whole lot more than the ski school director would like. I do plenty of demonstrations, follow mes and that sort of thing, but when I tell the student to "practice that from here to the lift", I turn it around and watch them, and try not to stem my switch turns.

PS Switch carving is a real challenge.
post #10 of 29
Try snowboarding. That way your friend can laugh at you and you can emphasize with your friend. Just try to stay out of each other's way!
post #11 of 29
All of the above are good suggestions. I'm working on these myself on my snowboard.

switch, switch carving, switch bumps(if some are next to the run), pivot slips, freestyle - ollie, frontside or backside 180's (whatever the ski equivalent is), flat ground 180' & 360's, toe to toe or heel to heel turns then try them in the air. Put on a blindfold and get a blindskier guide. Learn to use a sitski. Get on a snowboard or snowcycle. You'll really learn those blended skills.
post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
How many friends? Human slalom anybody? Or is that now a no no?
Probably a lot safer than human slalom if you have a group and want to keep them all involved is a moving rotation. One skier makes three or four turns and stops at the side of the slope. The next skis a couple turns past the first and also stops at the edge. Each additional participant skis IN FRONT of the stopped skiers until a couple turns down from the previous one. When the last skier in the group gets past the first skier, the first skier starts out and skis past the group to a position a couple turns below and stops again, on and on for the length of the run. Nobody stands for very long and everyone gets to watch everyone else from below, from the side and from above.
post #13 of 29
I usually work on my switch or try to do ground spins or other silly stuff...Or just try and help my friend enjoy their day.
post #14 of 29
Besides the above, seeking perfection. Also arcing turns while staying behind the people who are learning. Sometimes, if the learners are up to it you can play different games, follow the leader, tag, etcetera (notice I didn't say football ).
post #15 of 29
What kind of friend would expect you to stay on the green all day with them?
post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by volklskier1 View Post
What kind of friend would expect you to stay on the green all day with them?
Girlfriend or Boyfriend (depending on how you roll...)
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by volklskier1 View Post
What kind of friend would expect you to stay on the green all day with them?
Girlfriend/Boyfriend? Not so much.

1. People who are paying me to ski on the greens with them.
2. Small children not otherwise accompanied.
3. Relatives who offer the possibility of a significant inheritance.
post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry_Morgan View Post
Girlfriend/Boyfriend? Not so much.
Oh, come on, that WAS funny!
post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry_Morgan View Post
3. Relatives who offer the possibility of a significant inheritance.
post #20 of 29
Stuff backpack full of beer and drink on the ride up. As you continue to do this the day should become much more interesting. Eventually your novice friend will be skiing circles around you.
post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by PBR View Post
Stuff backpack full of beer
Joints and brownies are more portable... if you're into that sort of thing... just saying...
post #22 of 29
Tele.

Or work on skiing with absolutely perfect form at slow speeds.
post #23 of 29
Play dodge the newbie snowboarder. Where I ski that is the primary challenge on greens. Last night my 7 y.o. daughter wanted to go to the bunny slope becuase her cousin was skiing there -- I couldn't believe the number of beginning snowboarders there -- ski club night -- wow. They need a capacity limit!
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by kriswielga View Post
I usually work on my switch or try to do ground spins or other silly stuff...Or just try and help my friend enjoy their day.
Ding! We have a winner!
post #25 of 29
On the lift the other day, some kids said it was a perfect day for shadow skiing. Huh? I had to ask what they meant. On a sunny day they slalom around the moving chair shadows. I haven't tried it, but it sounds interesting.
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by eblackwelder View Post
On the lift the other day, some kids said it was a perfect day for shadow skiing. Huh? I had to ask what they meant. On a sunny day they slalom around the moving chair shadows. I haven't tried it, but it sounds interesting.
Yeah, shadow slalom is a lot of fun. Just be careful that you don't concentrate on the shadows too much, as other things can suddenly get in your line -- i.e., people, trees, lift towers, etc.
post #27 of 29
Working on turn initiation with ankle movement only . . . rolling from big toe/little toe to little toe/big toe being very conscious to move both skis up on edge simultaneously.
post #28 of 29
put lightbulbs in your pockets and ski backwards. Failure has penalties....
post #29 of 29


Combined with all the other suggestions in this thread it should at least make things interesting.
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