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Maybe I shouldn't convince people to go skiing anymore.

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
A friend of mine started skiing just before Christmas. I made a big point to show her how to remain visible from above and how to minimize time spent in risky positions the couple days we skied together.

I just found out she is in the hospital with a concussion and some other injuries. A snowboarder hit her and left her unconscious at the scene.


AWESOME.
post #2 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
A friend of mine started skiing just before Christmas. I made a big point to show her how to remain visible from above and how to minimize time spent in risky positions the couple days we skied together.

I just found out she is in the hospital with a concussion and some other injuries. A snowboarder hit her and left her unconscious at the scene.


AWESOME.
That sucks. What a jerk off, leaving her like that. I hope your friend heals up quick.
post #3 of 28
My wife and I starting take our sister-in-law skiing about ten years ago. She really liked it and was up to intermediate trails. Then a snowboarder hit her in the back, minor cracked vertebrae, full recovery. But, since she's a serious equestrian, she didn't want to risk just too scared to risk a permanent injury and gave up skiing for good.
post #4 of 28
That's just frightening! As someone who frequently skis by myself the idea of someone hitting me and leaving me there is scary. That's part of why if someone is down and looks potentially hurt I always slow and ask if they are okay. This weekend I got an attitude filled "yes" from some guy and a kid which had me just shaking my head in disbelief.
post #5 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by learn2turn View Post
But, since she's a serious equestrian, she didn't want to risk just too scared to risk a permanent injury and gave up skiing for good.
This is what I'm afraid of. She assured me she still loves skiing, but who knows how she will feel about it in the future.

I feel awful wondering if I was unable to impart the seriousness of the collision risk, as a new skier shouldn't be expected to understand without guidance just how common and serious they are.

I feel as if I led someone new into the BC without any idea what the risks are.
Quote:
Originally Posted by COSkigirl
That's part of why if someone is down and looks potentially hurt I always slow and ask if they are okay.
Nice, hope you don't let some jerk with an attitude dissuade you. I think even in the last 15 years I've noticed skiing becoming more impersonal, and I try my best to do what I can to help others. Doesn't take me but a moment to stop and grab a ski for someone and make sure they are OK.
post #6 of 28
I never even thought to ski with a helmet until those knuckle draggers came along
post #7 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by COSkiGirl View Post
That's just frightening! As someone who frequently skis by myself the idea of someone hitting me and leaving me there is scary. That's part of why if someone is down and looks potentially hurt I always slow and ask if they are okay. This weekend I got an attitude filled "yes" from some guy and a kid which had me just shaking my head in disbelief.
I saw a boarder on his back about 1/4 way out from the edge of a trail at Seven Springs a few weeks ago. I had a pretty good view of him as I approach for a good while, and he didn't move at all... It didn't look good...

So, I pulled up almost close enough to ask him if he was OK, when he sat up "oh, that's good..." I thought.

Then he finished his phone conversation, and put his phone away, and returned to his reclined position.


Smart. Very smart.


aaron
post #8 of 28
Seven springs and in general the Eastern resorts that I've seen tend to be full of the younger jerk type, especially on weekends and on Friday nights. They either race way too fast down Wagner and into the base, or just race their way through the beginner trails trying to bypass everyone. It reminds me how in grade school we had the trouble kid who was trying to see how good a biker he was by passing through our soccer goals with his bike while we were playing (no nets). I still have a huge scar from when he ended up not being such a good biker. It's a good thing he had no access to snow.

This year I got a midweek season pass and try to go only weekdays just so I can avoid this demographic. Once during a ski lesson a few years ago my instructor nearly got mowed down by someone coming down Wagner.

Seven springs in general is problematic when it comes to trail merges. In addition to the Wagner issue, there's the people who zip through Northwestern trail past Giant Boulder and into Giant Steps and often drop really fast.

Speaking of this, yesterday I was starting a run down Giant Steps (a black trail consisting of three increasingly long steps down the mountain with huge plateau) when I see a mother with three little kids trying to get down the first step, with some snowplowing and some sideslipping, as the boarders and all the fast runnings were zooming around them. I stopped and tried to see if I could help, and it turns out that the older kid (12+) told them they can get to a beginner trail that way (complete BS) and then zoomed away. I ended up standing over the younger kid and marking with my poles so people stay away, and then leading them down towards the relative safety of a blue trail so they wouldn't have to go down the much bigger "steps". If nobody had stopped to help them, this might have ended with one of the kids getting completely mowed down.
post #9 of 28
I had a similar incident last year at Keystone. I was waiting for my wife at the bottom of a relatively steep pitch when I saw a boarder take her out from behind. She took a very hard fall and a long ride down the hill on her back. I immediately scrambled up to check on her condition only to see the boarder ride off without so much as a word. After checking on her I shot down to the nearest lift to try and catch the #@*%$! but I was too late.

Having missed him I’ve declared open season on any hit-and-run offender, be it a skier or boarder. If I ever witness a hit-and-run incident and the victim is not in dire need of medical attention, I will do whatever I can to catch up with the culprit and obtain as clear a description our maybe even a camera phone picture to provide to the ski patrol or the local authorities. I would like to encourage others to do the same.
post #10 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by uricmu View Post
Seven springs and in general the Eastern resorts that I've seen tend to be full of the younger jerk type, especially on weekends and on Friday nights. They either race way too fast down Wagner and into the base, or just race their way through the beginner trails trying to bypass everyone. It reminds me how in grade school we had the trouble kid who was trying to see how good a biker he was by passing through our soccer goals with his bike while we were playing (no nets). I still have a huge scar from when he ended up not being such a good biker. It's a good thing he had no access to snow.

This year I got a midweek season pass and try to go only weekdays just so I can avoid this demographic. Once during a ski lesson a few years ago my instructor nearly got mowed down by someone coming down Wagner.

Seven springs in general is problematic when it comes to trail merges. In addition to the Wagner issue, there's the people who zip through Northwestern trail past Giant Boulder and into Giant Steps and often drop really fast.

Speaking of this, yesterday I was starting a run down Giant Steps (a black trail consisting of three increasingly long steps down the mountain with huge plateau) when I see a mother with three little kids trying to get down the first step, with some snowplowing and some sideslipping, as the boarders and all the fast runnings were zooming around them. I stopped and tried to see if I could help, and it turns out that the older kid (12+) told them they can get to a beginner trail that way (complete BS) and then zoomed away. I ended up standing over the younger kid and marking with my poles so people stay away, and then leading them down towards the relative safety of a blue trail so they wouldn't have to go down the much bigger "steps". If nobody had stopped to help them, this might have ended with one of the kids getting completely mowed down.
You have to watch those skiers straightlining it down to the goggle. I think on many levels, most of the danger at 7S revolves around the bar. As for asking a 12 year old kid for directions when there are maps posted top and bottom of every lift... well consider that a learning experience. besides, skiing is supposed to be an adventure; it sounds like they had one.

Actually getting mowed down and left unconscious on the side of a run is a different story altogether.
post #11 of 28
I got hit twice when I was little. Then I started to get better and speed up and I haven't been hit in years. It's a dog eat dog world. Really though, I guess that's a stupid way of looking at it. The problem comes when people who are going fast shouldn't be going that fast. Anyone can go fast, but not every is in control at those speeds. Just because someone is flying down a trail that a beginner happened to get stuck on doesn't mean they're being irresponsible. If they're not in control then they're irresponsible. I've never hit anyone but I would feel pretty damn guilty to just leave someone down if I did. And that's coming from a teen some of you might dismiss as your average out of control park skier.
post #12 of 28
On a nearly empty slope at Wilmot this past Sunday, I'm demoing, making predictable, moderate speed medium turns, when I hear the approach of a bipedal rectum flying toward the apex of my left turn... he brushes my skis with his, fortunately nothing happened, and it doesn't even look back to see if anything happened to me as I scream "f--king idiot".

But that's nothing compared to my wife's luck ten years ago at Sierra-at-Tahoe... first day of our Chistmas week trip... we are on a main green run, she's following behind me, gets her right ski and leg whacked by an out of control boarder, lands on left hip... much pain, nothing broken, so we go to the Summit lodge for an hour to chill.

We leave the lodge, ski down the same slope, and within 100 yds of the apot of the prior collision, again has her right ski/leg taken out by a beginner skier, again lands on her left hip. She developed a hematoma on her butt the size of my flat hand, and as thick as my palm, and had difficulty just sitting comfortably for months, though she had very little trouble sitting at the blackjack tables during that trip, as I recall.

To their credit, both of these teens stopped to make sure she was okay.
post #13 of 28
Anymore if anyone gets to close then up comes the pole,tip first. No it's not very professional but it wards off interlopers.
post #14 of 28
Yah, sounds good. So does some 38+P.
post #15 of 28
I am often, looking backward, tempted to see me as "ill luck" for those skiing with me, but I must say that I have had as many good experiences, many more in fact, than bad ones.
So no, I will not stop skiing with other people as long as other people will want to ski with me.
I like to ski alone too, that's not the matter, but we shouldn't think of ourselves as "bad luck" to others, we're all grown ups, and even as teens
we could asses danger (the fact that we, as teens, choose to ignore a danger because we feel immortal is another thing...) and take decisions for ourselves, to shift the "fault" for failures onto someone else's shoulder is
IMHO immature at best.
post #16 of 28
My GF was hit (from behind) a couple weeks ago at Durango. She didn't fall but the collision bent her pole into a 'C' shape. The mid twenty's Snowboarder stopped and apologized, and said something like 'Don't think all snowboarders are dangerous just because I happened to crash into your girlfriend"!

Geez.

p.s. Didn't bother asking him to pay for the pole, was just a cheap aluminum model.


:
post #17 of 28
You know, I often wonder about this myself. While I love skiing, and would rather be doing it than just about anything else, I know it is very risky; this really hit home after my injuries last year. I often invite people to try it out and encourage those that gave it up to come back....but in the back of my mind I am always worried if I am being negligent and putting freinds and family uneccessarily in harms way.

Take for example my brother, he has not skiied in two years, right now he has a lapse in his health insurance; it wont be in effect again until April. Since he is self employed and needs to be in one piece to work, I find myself not pushing him to come out and ski with me even though I enjoy skiing with him more than with anyone else. God forbid if he gets hurt because I told him to come skiing it would be devastating.

One way I get around this and not drive myself nuts is by simply letting others know when I am going skiing and tell them they are welcome to join me and how wonderful it is to ski....I find myself less and less trying to persuade people who are hesitant to try it for fear of being an accessory to harms way.
post #18 of 28
although it really sucks when stuff like this happens I can't think like that about the sport. Maybe it's because my nature is to take somewhat intelligent risks but I always see this as a part of the deal.

If you start thinking of every possible negative thing it'll drive you nuts and probably make it more likely to happen in some weird way.

When I think about it I did kind of give up on boarding when I was hit by another boarder overtaking me and they tried to blame me for it. I just didn't need that while I was trying to learn. I'm not that bad at it but the negative experience really turned me off to the whole thing.
post #19 of 28
My snowboarder son will be learning to ski during spring break. When I bought the Winter Park fourpasses last fall, I never considered that he might try out for the school musical just for the heck of it and get the lead role. If he gets hurt, the show has a big problem. There is no understudy. I'm way more worried about a leg injury than a collision with another rider. We may have to fix his snowboard and put the ski lessons off for another year.
post #20 of 28
This is why I mostly ski Alta and Mad River Glen -- besides the fact they're awesome mountains and skiied by great people. I'm sure snowboarders can be great, too, but I hear too many of these tales....
Anway. Sure, skiing's not the safest of sports, but, hey, you only live to ski once.
post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
A friend of mine started skiing just before Christmas. I made a big point to show her how to remain visible from above and how to minimize time spent in risky positions the couple days we skied together.

I just found out she is in the hospital with a concussion and some other injuries. A snowboarder hit her and left her unconscious at the scene.


AWESOME.
This is sad. Very sad. This is the kind of thing that gives our sport a bad name. : . I work for a large corporation and wanted to set up a ski and snowboard club inside the corporation. My corporation has lots of clubs from dance to archery. The letter I got from headquarter is that skiing is classified by my corporation as too dangerous.

I went skiing with a buddy of mine early in the season with limited trails opened at Mt Snow. The only trail my buddy could handle was an easy blue intermediate trail called Deer Run. I was scared to ski that damn intermediate trail. It was the most dangerous thing I have done on skis in years which includes trails like Alta 2, Expert Chutes, and Tower 3 at Jackson hole.
post #22 of 28
Another issue that is making things hairier... newer goggle designs have less peripheral vision because the frames are being made to fit into the constraints of helmet design. It took me about 6 shops before I found a goggle that gave me (barely) enough range that didn't also have a "bling" design or flimsy construction. Sheesh.
post #23 of 28
This must be a common occurrence.

A couple of weeks ago I’m coming down a trail when I see a mom on the far left and her kid far right. The kid was probably around 8 years old. You could see the kid was not a good skier yet. I stopped to wait for the kid to the obvious, turn towards his mom, so I could go behind him.

As I was stopped, I hear a fast scrapping behind me. There is this snowboarder coming at a pretty good clip and tries to squeeze between them. Well he didn’t squeeze. He hit the kid’s skis and knocked him down. ½ second later and the kid would had been plowed by a direct hit. Now, do you think the snowboarder stopped? Of course not. Once I saw that the kid was OK, I followed the boarder to the bottom and caught to him by the corral. My third surprise, first one being that he didn’t wait for the kid to cross, the second being that he didn’t stop after he hit the kid, is that this person was an adult not a teenager.

The dialog went as follows:

Me: Never ever do that again. You ran into a kid and didn’t stop.
SB (snow boarder or whatever you want SB to be): I was trying not to hit him.

That answer got me really going now and I started to yell at him.

Me: No you weren’t. I was. I stopped when I saw him. You instead kept going full speed. And not only you hit him, you didn’t even stop.
SB: some other excuse
Me (still yelling): You hit a kid and didn’t even stop.

By this time I could sense eyes from people in the corral looking at us. And I could hear them say “he hit a kid and didn’t stop.”

There was no patrol around and at that point I just left but I could see people still talking about it and pointing at him.

I hope he learned his lesson, but probably not.
post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by skilife View Post
I hope he learned his lesson, but probably not.
I'll just bet you DID make an impression, along with the stares he got. Thanks for doing the right thing!
post #25 of 28
thats why you ski at places like alta, no snowboarders, no problems like that
post #26 of 28
Thread Starter 
This poor girl would have gotten pummeled repeatedly the first time she got near one of the NASCAR traverses. Alta is about being the broiest-brah you can be, and if that means punching chicks in the face when they snake your flats, so be it.

(don't believe everything you read on the internet)

But yeah, I'm enjoying my remaining 12 or so days of Taos without the criminal element.
post #27 of 28
No You Should Convince More People To Ski, That Way When Something Like That Happens There'll Be A Half Dozen People There To Stomp The Air Out Of The Pos's Lungs... Safety In Numbers--- Retribution In Even Greater Numbers!
post #28 of 28
On another note, if I find mydelf trying to snake through traffic I have taken to singing loudly. Usually "Home, home on the range"... if you hear someone singing, you usually take notice...
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