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My daughters first day!!! (Pictures)

post #1 of 38
Thread Starter 
Warm, sunny and fun!



post #2 of 38
Off to a great start.
Not too many skis in those racks.
post #3 of 38
Waaa Hooo. havin some fun now and lookin good doing it.
(don't look now but I think she may be a little bit in the back seat!)
post #4 of 38
Thread Starter 
If you notice, though, her hands are in front.
post #5 of 38
Don't get blindsided! :
post #6 of 38
How cute. Looks like those goggles could cover her entire face.
post #7 of 38
How old is your daughter, U.P. Racer? I have a 11 month old and she loves the Kelty pack. How did you get up the slope with her and the Kelty pack; the lift? I would love to try this with my girl, but my wife would probably have a fit!
post #8 of 38
Thread Starter 
She'll be one year old on Jan. 4th. It is a bit tricky on the chair.... only about half your butt is on. I had one arm wrapped around the center pole, and the other hand hanging on too. Not real comfortable, but safe.
She really liked it. No problems with the height of the lift, the speed of skiing..... nothing. She never complained at all.
I'm taking her out again tomorrow, its supposed to be warm again.
post #9 of 38
Thread Starter 
On the chairlift. (Note: my wife looks more comfortable)

post #10 of 38
In New South Wales, Australia, you are not permitted to ride any lift with a baby in a pack. Not sure what their rules are on skiing with baby in a pack, but I don't think that is permitted either.
post #11 of 38
She is a better skier, not like the old man, ski with open mouth!
post #12 of 38
Well, you have to be reasonable, as I am sure U.P. Racer was. You don't keep the little one out there all day and you monitor them. You also do not choose to ski on the most difficult terrain. As UP said, it was a nice, warm day. He also said he is planning to do it again on another nice warm day.

We did this with my niece 12 years ago, but on a T-bar (surface lift). She loved it and hasn't stopped skiing since. When you have the little one on your back you are more careful than ever. You just don't take the chances you might otherwise.

I think it's great UP. She'll be out there skiing in no time!
post #13 of 38
Schuss, I am unsure if it is forbidden (i.e. by law or at least by resort rule) here in the Alps (France,Switzerland,Italy, Germany,Austria) but I think it should be.
It has happened in the past, babies diyng of hypotermia, while riding the backpack with their parents skiing the mountains.
They can't move in there, so will get cold much quicker than us...
post #14 of 38
We were out on the 26th, sorry we didn't see you! I was on the rope tow with my nephew all day -- whew, that's work!
Looks like you guys had fun!
Magoo
post #15 of 38
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I was wondering where you've been.... So, you guys in for Jackson Hole in February or what?
post #16 of 38
You're going Feb 10-15? Looks bleak for me for that time. Carrie is not interested; I got the OK to go solo if I want -- BUT, work schedule-wise, I'm not sure it'll work. Don't want to be a "third wheel" with you guys either!
We'll talk at the hill soon, I'm sure.
post #17 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by Matteo:
It has happened in the past, babies diyng of hypotermia, while riding the backpack with their parents skiing the mountains.
They can't move in there, so will get cold much quicker than us...
Gee, I didn't even think of the hypothermia. but you are absolutely right. I get really cold sitting outside and not moving.

I was actually thinking more of general accidents on the snow, or falling off a lift, and having the baby catapult out. Not sure of these little backpack things, I am sure they have straps and stuff but still.

The other thing is sitting with half a butt-cheek on a chair X number of metres above the ground isn't my idea of safe.

We have very tough OH&S requirements in Australia, and not being able to sit in the chair proberly (even if you are holding on) is a definate no-no.
post #18 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by skierteach:
...You also do not choose to ski on the most difficult terrain...

...When you have the little one on your back you are more careful than ever. You just don't take the chances you might otherwise.
How can you control the snow-users around you? From my experiences being on easier runs, there are a lot more novices around not always being able to control their turns or speed to avoid collision. Plus experienced skiers on easier terrain also have a tendency to go quite fast and be quite agressive. So just because you may be careful, sadly other people could give a stuff.
post #19 of 38
When we took my niece out we were at a small local area. Knowing the area and where the traffic is helps. Because of our connection with the area and the fact that most of the skiers there are regulars (townies), we did not run into any of the problems you refer to. I guess if we had been anywhere else we would have thought twice before taking her out there.
post #20 of 38
When we took my niece out we were at a small local area. Knowing the area and where the traffic is helps. Because of our connection with the area and the fact that most of the skiers there are regulars (townies), we did not run into any of the problems you refer to. I guess if we had been anywhere else we would have thought twice before taking her out there.
post #21 of 38
Thread Starter 
Exactly, skierteach. It is a small, local area. It wasn't busy. That's nice that some areas have regulations and rules, but I have enough common sense that I don't need regulations to protect me from myself. I can assure everyone, we were safe.

As far as a collision? I've skied 50 to 80 days per year for 26 years and have never had a collision with another skier or snowboarder. Could it happen tomorrow? Yes. So could many other things. I could be carrying her while crossing the street, and a car could pull out and hit us. We can't control what other cars are doing.

Falling out or being bounced out of the pack? It is designed for hiking. She's in a 4 point harness.

Thanks for the concern, but the fun she's having outweighs the slight risks.
post #22 of 38
UP and Skierteach, I have no doubt that you are careful, and am truly happy to see that people o'er there are starting to resent the intromission of laws even in minimal details of our lives, a trend that we here in Italy feel started there (rightly or wrongly).
But, for one/two like you, there are many, many others that aren't careful (and this term is too bland), that left their newborn child lying in the car the whole day, while they were skiing, only to find him/her dead at lift closing time (yes, it really happened)
So, laws and rules are there to protect these kind of people from themselves (and their children from them too).
I beleive I am a careful, competent skier, even so, when I suggested I might do the same thing you did I was beaten (figuratively) into a pulp by: then-wife, then-inlaws, mother, uncles, birds, cats and dogs, until I had to give up.
Now that my sons are 9 and 8 I truly enjoy a skiing day with them, since they can ski the whole day on their own skis, which is much, much more fun, beleive me. The danger of collisions is there all the time, of course we cannot foresee what could happen. Last saturday a teen ager in blades had a near-miss with my oldest son, he was clearly not in control while skiing in a slow-down area, at least he apologized.

PM, as said, I beleive I am a careful skier, never broke a bone while on skis, nevertheless, in 32+ years of skiing (avg 10-15 days per season, which, for me is a lot) I had at least 3 collisions that I remember and as many near-miss. All happened in the last 10 years, a hint that runs have really become crowded.
-Collided with a guy who had just taken a rest at the side of the run, clearly my fault, since I was not looking in front of me, because I was afraid of being hit from behind!!!
No damages reported, except a small dent in one of my skis top cover. Well, live to learn that you can't use your eyes only, while out there, eyes must lok forward. To cover the rear use another sense, like, the ear.
-Collided with a father who was taking his 6 years old daughter down a black run (used for downhill races). Said daughter decided to stop in a blind,steep spot because she was afraid and cold. Again, my fault, came in said blind spot without slowing down, hit a rock, lost a ski, and could only steer enough to hit the big guy instead of the kid. Big scare, no damages suffered, profusely apologized and took the following hard rebuke from said father and from an instructor that was nearby. Again lesson to learn: runs are not as empty as were before, must be more careful and remember that even if it is not "morally" right, everyone can decide to take his beginner child down a steep run that said child can't handle. It' a free counntry.
-Was hit from the right by a guy (not a friend not a mate, just another skier who happened to be there) who started after me on the same run, I tend to turn after 5-10 mts past the initial push, this guy wanted to accelerate more, so did went straight into my side. Again, no damages. I think this was not my fault (I-technically speaking-was the downhill skier). Lesson learnt: wait till everyone is well away from you, in front as well as behind, before starting.
-Near-miss my friend while skiing follow-the-leader at high speed
-A guy near missed my son and me when bombed between the two of us, last year, and then started to complain that I had cut his path!!! I nearly beated him wiyth my poles.

See, I am prepared to accept that I can be wrong, but when I know I am right, I cannot accept to be treted as the one at fault.
Bottom line, one cannot be careful enough, if one is too focused toward one danger area only, could find himself exposed (even at fault) from another.

Anyway, I was not judging anyone, when I first commented, you want to take your daughter with you, have fun, and enjoy ythe day with her! Happy new year!
post #23 of 38
Thread Starter 
P/M: Interesting...... You might have material for a thread of its own.
I live and ski primarily in Michigan. The ski areas get fairly busy, but I can't say I've heard of many collisions. (oddly enough, though, two friends of mine collided on Sunday.... one of them got a broken humerus and a dislocated shoulder)
Maybe I just haven't noticed, but it's true.... it's never happened to me. I have no idea why.

I take one or two trips to the Rockies (or Tetons) every year, and haven't every collided there either.

I wonder.... How common is it? Are there certain contributing factors that increase your risk?

I don't know. Anyway, back to what started all this. I only live 4 miles from the ski hill, the day was unseasonably warm, I was extra careful, and we only took 5 runs, maximum, at a ski area that has only 600 feet of vertical.

Better than sitting home watching TV.
post #24 of 38
U.P. it definitely beats sitting on the couch in front of the Telly!!!
post #25 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by PhysicsMan:
I wonder how often other decent skiers get nailed on average?

Tom / PM
I have had other skiers and mostly boarders skid in back of me and hit my tails with their boards.

My wife seems to have a target on her back though.

One time at Killington she got hit my a boarder and she landed on her face and have herself a nice shiner.

Last week at Sunapee some little shit was flying through a lift line and clipped her in the shoulder and spun her around. Thankfully I did not see it or I would have been pissed.

I always wondered why she always gets hit and knocked over while I do not.

I ski faster than she does so maybe that helps.
post #26 of 38
In all the years I've skied at Marquette Mtn I don't remember seeing someone going straight down out of control. It's a local hill and most of the skiers are "townies" who have skied all their lives.
As far as U.P. never being run into, if you'd ever seen him ski (without the backpack)you'd know why. The guy is FAST. They can't catch up to him.
post #27 of 38
QUOTE]Originally posted by PhysicsMan:

I wonder how often other decent skiers get nailed on average?

Tom / PM
[/quote]

I don't know that I qualify as a decent skier, but on the local hills in the DC area I would think the average would be pretty high. We were at Whitetail last Sat. and probably saw 5 or 6 collisons (all boarders) and many near misses. While unavoidable situations occur, most of it's unexcusable and is the result of some idiot being out of control. If you ski under control and are on terrain that you can handle, these situations should be few and far between.
post #28 of 38
I do not remember ever being hit (or hitting anyone), either, in 33 years of skiing (although I haven't had as many days per season as UPR). My wife, however, got hit about once per year during the 10 years she skied. It got so bad that the last time she got hit (at Taos!) I asked if she wanted me to stay with her or chase the idiot the next time. Her reply? "Go get 'em!" Of course, since then, it's become illegal to hit and run while skiing (at least in Colorado).

It probably helps that I ski reasonably fast and usually on trail edges if I'm not in an open bowl. The accidents seem to happen largely in the middle of the trails where the out-of-control folks tend to be.
post #29 of 38
UPRacer, I have no problem with a truly careful, competent, experienced skier taking his kid out skiing the way you did. Dads like this will undoubtedly make good conservative decisions with respect to issues like speed, choice of trail, conditions, other traffic, lift safety, etc.

OTOH, what I am astonished by is your statement, "I've skied 50 to 80 days per year for 26 years and have never had a collision with another skier or snowboarder."

On average, I've probably been hit about once or twice per season for the last 30+ years. It's happened to me in lift lines, standing so far off the edge of the trail that my tails were in the woods, running protection behind a slow beginner, etc. The last time I was hit was just a couple of weeks ago. During a clinic, I was whizzing along at high speed, right on the tails of the guy leading the group, when another instructor nailed me from behind. It was supposed to be follow-the-leader, but for some unknown reason, the guy who hit me was zigging left while the leader and I were zagging to the right.

Fortunately, I've never hit anyone else, and I only have come close (eg, skiing over someone's tails) a couple of times (as best I can remember) in the past 30+ years.

UP, what's your secret? Only ski after the lifts are closed? Never stop and never ski under Mach 8? I wonder how often other decent skiers get nailed on average?

Tom / PM
post #30 of 38
Only three times in my ski life have I ever seen someone so utterly clueless..it is difficult not to use the more correct language...and this makes it the fourth. If there isn't a law on the books in the states , then there should be. If there are any lift attendants reading this then please do the right thing and prevent morons like this from getting on the lift. And I can't believe there are words of encouragement here.What is wrong with you people? Yes, obviously you and your child need to be protected from yourselves. It doesn't matter how good of a skier you think you are. You can catch an edge on the bunny hill and down you and the precious one go. It's inconceivable that someone can put their child in harms way on the slopes like this. You're not thinking (obviously) about how much fun little one is having but about how you yourself are not going to get trapped into the traditional babysitting mode while being deprived of your own passion. Get a brain man and maybe put a helmut on it. Meanwhile I'm going to be contacting ski area heads because I don't think they're aware of the stupidity out there.
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