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Why is "the above skier" ALWAYS at fault ?? ( I DO NOT agree) - Page 4

post #91 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post
 

 

The code says no such thing. 

 

 

 

2. People ahead of you have the right of way. It is your responsibility to avoid them.

 

 

This is what  meant by "downhill skier" -- a person skiing ahead of you, presumably downhill. 

 

I assume you're arguing that a stopped skier down hill of you has the responsibility to stop where he or she does not "obstruct a trail, or [is] not visible from above," and that a downhill skier, when starting from a stop or merging, must yield to others.  Fair enough.  (On the other hand, I'd rather preserve my own skin and avoid them all, rights or no rights -- AND follow the code when I'm the downhill skier.)

post #92 of 105
Since this is an international support, not a US, thought we might as well look at the FIS version, the comments.





post #93 of 105
Hey Robert,

You need to start your own thread on this very important subject.

You also need to supply GoPro video of these dangerous situations you are describing.

Thanks in advance!
post #94 of 105

Dear Robert, Is the reason you went home early that you ran someone down and injured them and had to leave before you got caught? Or that you hit someone and they yelled at you and were like all mean and hurt your feelings? In any case, I'm very glad to hear that you've quit skiing. Please don't change your mind. I do have to thank you, though. It's posts like yours that keep this forum so entertaining. 

 

The FIS version of the Code is also highly entertaining. Obviously written by the French, with commentary by a Talmudic scholar.


Edited by oldgoat - 3/24/14 at 2:54pm
post #95 of 105

Wait, I just caught the bump.  Now I feel stupid.

post #96 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

1) I hope you touched wood after saying that; you are tempting fate.

2) You need to get a good pair of carving skis and learn how to use them; then you will only need to shut 'er down 1/2 the time.

 

I don't find the gapers on the hill so annoying, what is annoying is the jibbers and boarders who shoot onto the trail from the trees without checking uphill first.

 

Oh yeah,  welcome to Epicski.

Avoiding "gapers" is not so bad, really all it takes is control and line choice.  

One rule is the closer you are to overtake, the closer your speed compared to theirs.  

Another good rule is to place your turn around theirs so that your vector/momentum is always away from theirs.

 

Once you get accustomed to how this principle works even the unpredictible movements can adjust your line without needing to "stop".  Even then stopping is not the end of the world or your buzz.

 

Tis the dooshes diving from the woods where you cannot possibly see them in time to make a defensive move that drives men nuts.

 

A few years back on an epic powder day the big chair high up was delayed until after noon, as the patrol readied for the rope drop the Chinese downhill cued up.  I was lucky to be at the rope itself and made it to the vanguard of straightlining riders down the cat track to the Gold Hill lift.

 

Almost at the corral, some dudette boarder flys from the trees leaving me no chance but to push her over.  Some other dude came at me almost fighting, yelling at me because I was "the uphill rider" and how it was all my fault.

 

Not having time to argue, I bailed to the growing lift line instead, I did make sure the girl was OK, then gave her a few tips on JUMPING OUT OF TREES into a mass of straightlining skiers(don't do that).

post #97 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buttinski View Post
 

Avoiding "gapers" is not so bad, really all it takes is control and line choice.  

One rule is the closer you are to overtake, the closer your speed compared to theirs.  

Another good rule is to place your turn around theirs so that your vector/momentum is always away from theirs.

 

Once you get accustomed to how this principle works even the unpredictible movements can adjust your line without needing to "stop".  Even then stopping is not the end of the world or your buzz.

 

Tis the dooshes diving from the woods where you cannot possibly see them in time to make a defensive move that drives men nuts.

 

A few years back on an epic powder day the big chair high up was delayed until after noon, as the patrol readied for the rope drop the Chinese downhill cued up.  I was lucky to be at the rope itself and made it to the vanguard of straightlining riders down the cat track to the Gold Hill lift.

 

Almost at the corral, some dudette boarder flys from the trees leaving me no chance but to push her over.  Some other dude came at me almost fighting, yelling at me because I was "the uphill rider" and how it was all my fault.

 

Not having time to argue, I bailed to the growing lift line instead, I did make sure the girl was OK, then gave her a few tips on JUMPING OUT OF TREES into a mass of straightlining skiers(don't do that).

 

This would be merging rider, not downhill rider.  You're right.

post #98 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

 

The FIS version of the Code is also highly entertaining. Obviously written by the French, with commentary by a Talmudic scholar.

 

Now I can't help but re-read this in the intonation of jacob the bar mitzvah boy from SNL (played by vanessa bayer)

http://www.hulu.com/watch/542155

post #99 of 105

Isn't the expanded discussion of Rule 5, paragraph 3, interesting?  It sort of covers the "look over your shoulder" thing.  

 

I am guessing that the fact that 80% of the people on the slopes can't get through reading the verbiage of our abbreviated rules is why some of these expansions haven't been adopted into the Code here.  

post #100 of 105

It's cool that the code still makes so much sense, after all these years.

 

Nobody has eyes in the back of their heads.  Can't change that.

 

One man's "consistent and predictable" line is another's (mine) dull and boring line.  Whoever got the idea that if somebody's first 5 turns are short, the rest of their run should be the same?  Nonsense.

 

Finally, despite all this, when I'm carving aggressively, I look uphill over my shoulder, because, well, it just kinda makes sense!

post #101 of 105
or.... spend more time rippin' the double blacks.... rarely as crowded.... that is... I mean.... you can go fast on something besides the green runs.... right ???? I mean if you're bombing the greens aren't you the gaper ????

oh never mind....
post #102 of 105
Down hill skiers are always at fault. They are the dorks, veering unpredictably, dithering in the bumps, sideslipping, staring off without looking, standing on tracks or just generally being an obstruction.
Run them down it's the only way they will learn to keep out of the way.
post #103 of 105
Or just give them a really wide bearth
post #104 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by bloxy View Post

Or just give them a really wide bearth

kinda like your mama gave you ??? wink.gif
post #105 of 105
Berth not birth.

Wide Berth

Meaning

A goodly distance.
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