EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › studies on the negative effects of hydrocarbon waxes
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

studies on the negative effects of hydrocarbon waxes

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
There's plenty of information on the hazards of PFCs (and subsequently PFOAs) that are found in flourinated waxes both in fumes from waxing and long-term effects in groud/source water. I'm having trouble however, finding similar information on the effect of hydrocarbon waxes. Have these studies just not been performed (PFCs and PFOAs are much more widely used) or am I not looking in the right places? Anyone have any leads?

Also, yes, I have "googled" it.

For anyone who is thinking of responding with "hydrocarbon waxes pose no short or long term effects," please refrain from doing so.
post #2 of 15
http://www.osha.gov/dts/sltc/methods...2047/2047.html

I think you're probably interested in the 1962 Shubik et al. reference.
post #3 of 15
My only thought, which comprex implicitly, at least, seems already to have thought, is that ski-waxing accounts for a miniscule portion of the use (industrial, recreational, etc.) of hydrocarbon waxes.
post #4 of 15
I was thinking that may be the surgen general should make the company's put a warning label on wax's. After all it seems some of us become addicted to waxed skis. So that must be a bad thing.

Anybody else care...
post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mortimer View Post
For anyone who is thinking of responding with "hydrocarbon waxes pose no short or long term effects," please refrain from doing so.
Sounds like you are more interested in a predetermined result than an answer.

Ear wax has done more harm than ski wax.
post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor D View Post
Sounds like you are more interested in a predetermined result than an answer.

Ear wax has done more harm than ski wax.
I dont mind if you offer a link to a study of hydrocarbon waxes and their effect on short term (inhalation) or long term (degradation/non-degradation into the environment) that as less harmful than ear wax, but I'm guessing you dont know that for sure. It's not the answers here I'm looking for, I'm looking for any known references to studies.

Thanks for the paraffin wax link!
post #7 of 15
the same waxes used in hydrocarbon ski wax have been used in candle making, floor and furniture wax, food packaging, and even as food additives for more than a century. they fall under the fda category of "generally recognized as safe". hydrocarbon waxes = paraffin, microcrystalline, fischer-tropsch, and polyethylene waxes. they are ubiquitous in everyday life.
post #8 of 15
Yeah, exactly.

Paraffin is commonly burned in fancy restaurants and at romantic dinners, or sometimes just when the power goes out. You can eat it if you feel like it: it's even produced in "food grade" quality. Anybody ever have wax lips? We also give boxes of brightly colored paraffin cylinders to children.
post #9 of 15
http://www.realcajunrecipes.com/reci...-balls/509.rcr

Quote:
Makes: 30 servings
Prep Time:
30 minutes
Cook Time:
5 minutes
Ready In:35 minutes

Ever had too much cake left over from your holiday or party celebration? This recipe gives leftover cake a completely different and unique flavor. This is also easy for children to make. Wonderful taste and great for the holidays. Fill your gift tins with this delight.

Ingredients
German Chocolate leftover cake or any type of leftover cake
2 bags 12 oz semi-sweet chocolate chip
1 block gulf wax

Directions

OK everyone, we know that you have been dying to do this. Take your leftover cake and SMUSH it altogether with your hands. Make small balls about quarter size. The original recipe had this with German chocolate cake but any cake will do.

In a fondue pot or double boiler, melt the chocolate and gulf wax together. Take a fork and dip the cake balls in the melted chocolate. Place the balls on a piece of aluminum foil to cool. Enjoy with a freshly brewed cup of coffee.
post #10 of 15
Does this recipe improve the glide of your innards? Scrape and brush or no?
post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by epl View Post
the same waxes used in hydrocarbon ski wax have been used in candle making, floor and furniture wax, food packaging, and even as food additives for more than a century. they fall under the fda category of "generally recognized as safe". hydrocarbon waxes = paraffin, microcrystalline, fischer-tropsch, and polyethylene waxes. they are ubiquitous in everyday life.
Thanks epl and everyone else for the info! I'm gonna go eat my emergency candle now. Let it snow.
post #12 of 15
I'm going after my parents for abuse! They made me place my face near burning wax, inhale and then exhale with vigor every single year!

Still waiting for my infinite wishes too!
post #13 of 15
Hydrocarbons must be the issue. Especially those aromatic kinds, as found in BACON.
post #14 of 15
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor D View Post
I was in error regarding its dangers, sorry.
Are you sure?

I mean look at that reddened skin and puffy cheeks.

That's hexavalent ear wax, fer sure.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › studies on the negative effects of hydrocarbon waxes