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So who skis with headphones on?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
So I'm sitting here in Baastan with my helmet over my in-the-ear headphones on catching up on Epic and Audiworld.

Just thought I'd ask who likes to ski to tunes and no outside interruptions. I can't hear a damn thing other than what's playing in my ears. May be dangerous....but the beats could do some serious motivation on the slopes!

Do you ski with, and what do you listen to? I've got Dee-Lite going right now. But I think some sweet house music could get my ass dancing out there this season.
post #2 of 28
I tried tunes. My balance was always affected.

Of lesser concern was safety. I started to think that if someone said, "On your right" and I didn't hear them...Eh, not good.

Nice for single chair rides though.
post #3 of 28
Thread Starter 
That's what I was thinking too...
post #4 of 28
Last time I skied with headphones on...
...I ended halfway up a (small) spruce.
My uncles (who where skiing with me at that time) still laugh at the thought.
I never brought with me a walkman on the slopes again since (it was 19 yrs ago)
post #5 of 28
I don't actually even own a set...
post #6 of 28
I remember when they first came out. I had a Sony unit. It was almost 5 pounds, and had all of these straps to secure it on my
chest. I would ski bumps and the thing would give me bruises. We skied in a pack of about 5-6 ne'er do wells, all plugged in, terrorizing the hill, Jiminy Peak......

Allen
post #7 of 28
don't ski, or do anything else outdoors, with headphones on. Why ski with headphones? Can't stand the sound of being outdoors?
And what is Audiworld?
post #8 of 28
CP:

I fall in the no-headphones category. I kind of appreciate silence when I have the opportunity to experience it.

I have this indelible memory of the time I rode up a chair with a seriously plugged-in dude. It was a moderately cold and windy day, he was wearing a hat and parka hood over his earphones, and I could *still* hear his music very plainly from across the chair. I'm not sure what decibel level that would work out to inside his head, but I suspect it was pretty darn high (as was he).

A setup called AstralTunes was the first real music headphone gadget for the ski market. They were very popular for a few years. Those of us who were less inclined to ski with music called them "A**holeTunes".

Bob
post #9 of 28
I can see both sides. Sometimes I really like to listen to muci while skiing and riding the chair, and sometimes I really enjoy more silence. I do agree that people shouldn't inflict noise polution on other's regardless. Nothing worse than riding the metro (subway) in the morning next to someone who has some laterday R&B (owwwwoowwwoooo babiiiee can we doooo it toniteeee...) cranked.

That said, I really enjoy skiing with good music, wether it's the Beastie Boys or Phillip Glass, for me it can really set a mood and get me relating to the energy of skiing instead of worrying about this and that and thinking too much. I think its helped me be a stronger, more confident skier, to be honest. Or maybe just a more obnoxious one, who know's...

Silence is really nice too, or just listening to the lift noises and the wind blow..its all good.

Anyway, I only really crank it when there is a nice open completely uncrowded run. You can wear the headphones slightly off the ear and at a volume that you can hear other skiers, etc.. I do usually turn it off or at least way down when I get in crowded situations, esp. approaching liftlines.

<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ October 26, 2001 10:22 AM: Message edited 1 time, by Lodro ]</font>
post #10 of 28
I like the Silence of outside when skiing, I already listen to enough loud music (here at home right now, in the car, etc...) One of my concerns about music on the hill is that it might make me too aggresive on the hill, I already ski hard enough, that might drive me over the edge...(of a 100ft cliff : )
post #11 of 28
Quick answer: no, but more thoughtfully; the sounds of the outdoors can only be enjoyed then & there, music can be anytime. Some folks listen to CD's of outdoor sounds indoors! Am I crazy or do other people listen to the sounds of their own bodies? breathing, joints, etc
post #12 of 28
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by NewHampie:
Quick answer: no, but more thoughtfully; the sounds of the outdoors can only be enjoyed then & there, music can be anytime. Some folks listen to CD's of outdoor sounds indoors! Am I crazy or do other people listen to the sounds of their own bodies? breathing, joints, etc<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


Not at all.. its amazing how loud your own breath can sound on a still powder day away from the crowds and lifts. Its one of the very great pleasures of skiing.
post #13 of 28
I like silence when skiing. Nothing beats the occasional moment when you are alone on a run, the snow is falling lightly and you can only hear your breathing.
post #14 of 28
Be carefull. I get so pumped up when I ski with my minidisc onm that I`m a danger to my self and others. I always think that I king of the hill and try to pull of a completly seek stunt on the bigjump or in the pipe.
In fackt I cant ski at all this seeson cause I tore of my crucial ligament 3 years ago when I was listening to guano apes and ****ed up a landing after a 100 feet backflipp. This fall my kne was starting to get so unstable that I had to have an opperation.

The best skii music: Guano apes, papa roach, tool, rage, ash, dandy warhooles etc. :
post #15 of 28
For the last decade I have rarely skied with my cassette player
but there was a time when I did so often. I've been a dedicated
skier for over twenty years and during the first half dozen years
I skied with my Walkman about 30% of my runs. At that time I was
happy to mainly just ski groomed slopes. Although I can enjoy
many types of music, I am particularly a rock fan. I remember one
glorious run down Olympic Downhill at Heavenly Valley in perfect
dry mid winter packed powder listening to The Outlaws, epic and long
"Green Grass and High Tides". Likewise might have listened to
other long rock classics of the day like Freebird or Starship Trouper.
Of course on groomed slopes one can ski mindlessly in terms of
paying attention to the terrain and instead dance ones turns in
synchronization to the music. I never had any problem avoiding
other skiers as I developed a habbit of looking uphill for faster
approaching skiers when moving out of my line. There are certainly
potential problems in not being able to hear things like "on your
right", but the same holds true on stormy days bundled up with
head gear.

Unfortunately all that led to some particularly bad habits when I
tried to take my skiing to more difficult terrain, particularly
moguls. Such terrain requires a skier to be keenly visually
aware of the terrain which was alien to the skiing I had been
doing. I suspected the music was my problem and went cold turkey
skiing for a couple season without music. Gradually I started to
be able to focus on the terrain better which confirmed my suspicions.
For the last decade, bumps have been a major terrain focus of my
ski days, and I love the pin ball sensations of skiing them smoothly
down the direct fall line. When I occassionally bring up the Walkman
these days, I will listen to inspiring music on the lift ride up
but will not ski bumps with the music on as it would be too
distracting.

Sometimes on stormy powder days the lifts get pretty lonely and one
is bundles up in gear like the Pirelli Tire Man. In these later years
I have occassionally greatly enjoyed listening to music while
porpoising rhythmically within the white soft wonderland. -dave
post #16 of 28
When I am on any type of big "mountain" with large crowds / varied terrain, I don't like to wear headphones. But back in the east, I think I will need something to keep me occupied. I'm making a burnt CD for skiing right now. So far, I have STP, Phish, Sublime, 311, CCR, Ozzy, and Radiohead on it. Any other ideas?
post #17 of 28
hmmm..I think music can be espcially nice in bumps, and as RosiGirl says, in the East. For whatever reason. I don't find that it dirupts my rhythm at all. Maybe because I haven't got any.. [img]tongue.gif[/img]

<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by rossi9irl:
I'm making a burnt CD for skiing right now. So far, I have STP, Phish, Sublime, 311, CCR, Ozzy, and Radiohead on it. Any other ideas?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Wow, where to begin, trying to think what kind of mixes I have. I've got to say, Zep is right there. Travelling Riverside Blues seems just about perfect. Aformentioned beasties. Usually throw some baroque stuff in there. The Jam. Minor Threat!? Throwing Muses. Maybe some bebob. Kate Bush. : Don't ask me why.. _Definetly_ Allman Brothers.

Maybe in a funny way, its the energy of the music and not the beat that matter; in fact I think I like stuff for skiing that _doesn't_ have a strong beat that your body would be trying to sych up to. Either languid or fast, but I dunno for sure. What do you think Dave, does that make any sense?

btw, I've always wondered how loud the headphones must be that you can here through hats, hoods, etc.. My minidisc won't even go high enough where I can hear it even a foot or two away. Its often overcome by ambient noise, which is fine.

<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ October 28, 2001 09:52 AM: Message edited 3 times, by Lodro ]</font>
post #18 of 28
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Lodro:
hmmm..I think music can be espcially nice in bumps, and as RosiGirl says, in the East. For whatever reason. I don't find that it dirupts my rhythm at all. Maybe because I haven't got any..
Maybe in a funny way, its the energy of the music and not the beat that matter; in fact I think I like stuff for skiing that _doesn't_ have a strong beat that your body would be trying to sych up to. Either languid or fast, but I dunno for sure. What do you think Dave, does that make any sense?
...
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Its true skiing with high powered rock in the bumps has traditionally been a part of freestyle competition from the beginning as many bump skiers probably can use that sonic energy to drive their skiing. I've skied with music in the bumps and can be looking ok for a bit then maybe start to lose it. The music is just another distraction getting in the way of something that is one of the most difficult physical challenges of any sport. What percentage of skiers ski bumps well and smoothly? A very low percentage.

I think the influence of the music will be different for different people. Some true rock music listeners say at concerts listen to their music and pretty much just get into upper body rhythms to the beat while other people might dance slightly and then others might be full blown rock dancing machines. For the first types the music would more likely be just better energy, but for the latter types (me) there may be a conflict between muscel memory for dancing versus skiing. -dave
post #19 of 28
I have never used headphones when skiing. I thought about it last season, but the truth is that sometimes the hill does not allow you to ski in rhythm with the music (especially the _uneven_ bumps on my home hill). I swam competitively for many years, and I found that the music stuck in my head was the best for keeping a rhythm (because I can change the music at will ), and the same works for me on the mountain. Anyway, just my two cents...
post #20 of 28
LOL! All these stories bring back memories.....the bulky "walkmans" the loss of awarness of my surroundings. Not good in my book. Another problem I experienced was getting out of rhythm while in bumps due to the tempo of the tune I was listening to.

Nope no headphones these days. I enjoy the sound of the snow and connecting with nature rather than tuning out.

I save tuning out for when I'm at work. [img]tongue.gif[/img]


O.
post #21 of 28
Hmmm...this is really interesting to think about -- I'd given a bit of thought, but not much -- I don't know, but I don't see listening to music as neccessarily tuning out. The thing is, you can tune out anytime, just by being mindless, you don't need music for that. Maybe you start getting pissed off about a boarder cutting you off, or maybe you start obsessing about some little technique issue, or wondering what your SO meant when they said..

While the two often go hand and hand, and music listening can be synonymous with mindlessness, it is also totally possible to be listening to music and aware, that is.."Here I am; listenting to music, while I ski." We don't say a ballet dancer is "tuning out" as they dance, instead, they are intimatly connected to the space, their movement, _and_ the music.

Of course, it is a simpler and truly wonderful thing just to relate to the noise and silence of the mountain itself, but I'm not sure its neccessarily more noble, or whatever.

Just as a side observation, while 'nature' seems more apparant at a ski resort, a ski resort has many 'artificial' components as well; to a bobcat, it probably seems like grand central station! I always find that kind of interesting, you have these little pockets of silence, especially as you get off-piste, but then you have a ton of people, noise, and activity intertwined with it. So its kind of balanced between the two worlds.
post #22 of 28
Lodro:

I'm sure you are ref. to the collective replies re: tuning out but I would like to clarify my reply.

I was speaking of tuning out the sounds of nature which is what happens to me when my ears are full of music. I can't here the world around me.

I wonder how much a ballarina really hears the music...I would be interested to know. I've participated in competitions where music is played. Always prior to my turn I would think of the perfect song I'd like to have playing but when I was in the arena I could never hear it because I was so focused on my performance. Interesting.

O.
post #23 of 28
I don't wear headphones.

I have thought of recording all the weird sounds chairlifts make so I can play that at night to lull me to sleep and to get into my dreams.

humms, sqeaks, vibrations...

They may be mechanical but chairlifts make some of the most relaxing sounds I know, like a river bubbling by or the wind in the leaves of a cottonwood.
post #24 of 28
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Sugar Snack:
I'm sure you are ref. to the collective replies re: tuning out but I would like to clarify my reply.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Oh, yea, sorry, didn't mean to make that sound like a critique, more like just my justification for using them. "Hey, I'm not tuning out, man, I'm tuning in. Dig?" It is a tradeoff, for sure.

<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Sugar Snack:
[QB]I wonder how much a ballarina really hears the music...I could never hear it because I was so focused on my performance.[QB]<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


Yea, I wonder too...any ballet dancers or figure skaters, or bump and halfpipe competiioneers for that matter out there? How does music effect your performance, if at all?

If they claim it has no effect, or even a detrimental effect, I was thinking it might be a little like drugs and musicians. : On VH1, all these artists are always claiming that they didn't need drugs to create, and they are more successful now that they have stopped. Same with many of the Jazz greats, you know they all smoked and did a lot more than that, and people say that didn't effect their music, if anything they would have been a lot better without it. Then how come so much great music was created under the influence, you know. [img]tongue.gif[/img] I know, pretty far-fetched analogy...
post #25 of 28
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Then how come so much great music was created under the influence, you know.[/QB]<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

btw, I'm not trying to morph this into a "skiing stoned" thread, promise. Been many years since I've done that, anyway.
post #26 of 28
I don't ski with headphones.
Ever.


colin
post #27 of 28
YEAH!
Ski with TUNES! GOOD!
It is a must to turn them off in line when folks are around to be polite. But to have them and the choice to ski with them or with out while you are OUT there is important. I may ski a rin or two with my system off. Then a bunch with it on. On lifts I try and be polite and keep it off as in the lift line however once on board if the others are not talkative ROCK ON.

To all of you who don't wear them cause you need to hear some one say on your right all I can say to you is ski faster! GRANDPA!
post #28 of 28
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dr.GO:
[QB]YEAH!
On lifts I try and be polite and keep it off as in the lift line however once on board if the others are not talkative ROCK ON.[QB]<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yea, the social graces of skiing as well as the natural. I try to not give people the cold shoulder, which means having it off when hopping on the lift and so on, could pay a little more attention to this..
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