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untiinflammatory for knees?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Any recommendations for 'in emergency' situation, where you are on skiing vacation and your knees are getting sore? What works best? (I know it's a personal thing, but...)
Thanks in advance,
Paul

PS: inthe past was ACL/meniscus injury.
post #2 of 25
ibuprofen (advil/motrin) is the standard for that sort of thing
post #3 of 25
i find alieve is better for inflamation

also consider

gel cold wraps - leave them in freezer and use them at end of day

massage - you can actually massage you patella - you leg has to be flat and totally relaxed - you can manipulatge your patella - provides relief at least for a little while depending on the origin of the pain
post #4 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by rrryan View Post
i find alieve is better for inflamation
True. Naproxen has done much better for me, too.

Once, I had to compete in a national championship event, and had torn an abdominal muscle (serious pain). I, at the advice of a physician, alternated naproxen and ibuprofin on a rotating schedule, but I wouldn't necessarily advise going that route.


aaron
post #5 of 25
Naproxen and ibuprofen have anti-inflammatory properties. Aspirin and acetaminophen do not. Your call. I tend to stick to Vitamin I.

I've had the ACL meniscus thing too.
post #6 of 25
Not what you asked . . . and not sure if you've ever checked this out, but wonder your injuried are agravated by a biomechanical problem that originates lower down the chain. You say ACL/meniscus injury . . . on both knees? If so, then maybe you can toss out my reponse, and it's just one of those things you have to suffer through.

You might want to look into taking glucosomine and chondroitin sulfate on a regular basis. You can do your own googling on it . . . but if my memory serves me well research has at least proven the anti-inflammatory effects (and therefore pain relief) of one or both of these.

Well, okay, here's one reference: http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?... ent_info.cfm
post #7 of 25
Where is the knee sore, and when you say sore is it a sharp pain, or a kind of swollen feeling where your knee feels stiff? What works for me when my knee feels stiff or a little sore it to stretch that hamstring. Hows your flexibility in general? Stretching might help, not only for temporary relief, but if you increase your flexibility you may see long term results of less knee pain.
post #8 of 25
See your Orthopod:
He may recomend a Cortizone shot.
post #9 of 25
My ortho has me on naproxen or ibuoprofen (but never take them together). If I feel a little more pain while on naproxen or ibuprofen, then he says to take some acetaminophen.

Then a healthy dose of apres ski RICE.
post #10 of 25
An Ortho that works with me recommends 3 anti-inflamatories of your choosing( advil, alieve or aspirin) and one tylenol. Another poster was right about the tylenol not having anti inflamatory properties but will help with the pain. The 2 types of meds work well together and are processed by the liver and kidneys so there is no prob taking them together. I have tried it and it works well. I take it at night and first thing in the am.
Remember I'm not a Doctor
post #11 of 25
Apres-ski beer or a-beverage of your choice to be adminstered orally. It will not do squat for your knees :, but if taken in sufficient dosage you will no longer care about the ouch !!!!! :

If you decide to ignore my sage advice, please consider the more traditional approches my fellow Bears have suggested.

Falcon_O aka Charlie
post #12 of 25
my ortho says similar; 3 advil 4x daily start 2 days before you head out so it builds in system. Ice packs. It can be hard on your stomach, but it does help. Also, make sure you are stretching your hampstrings well and in my case I was torquing my knees when strecthing my quads, so make sure you are not inadvertantly stressing your knees. Stay off hard bumps and hits! Thats a biggie. Remember to also stretch your ITB! neoprene brace will help keep it warm. I used thermopads on my stomach and groin last week and it did help to keep them loose. I know they make them for knees too.
post #13 of 25
(I'm not a doctor, but I did deal with some minor sports injuries in college and I know people who dealt with major ones.)

Just another reiteration that if you want to combine meds -- especially if you are on any perscription drugs -- you might want to run it by your doctor over the phone. A pharmacist should also be able to check for interactions if you know everything you are on or want to take.

Ibuprofen and Naproxen Sodium (Advil/Motrin and Aleve, respectively) are the normal over-the-counter recommendations for inflammation. Aleve is nice because it lasts a long time -- but you can't really take more of it if you start hurting again halfway through the day. Advil only lasts about 4 hours, but you can adjust the dosage more. As others have mentioned, don't take them together (but you can alternate them on different days to help with building up tolerance). You can combine either with Tylenol (Acetaminophen) for additional pain relief. You might want to try both to see what works better for you personally.

Stretching (before and after activity, and/or just whenever you can) will usually help. Warming up thoroughly before strenuous activity should help, or at least make you less likely to injure yourself.

Cold therapy (ice or cold gel packs) applied for 15-20 minutes will reduce inflammation at the end of the day. You can do multiple rounds of it, but let your joints warm back up in between.

A further warning -- be careful skiing hard or even working out hard when you're injured if you're heavily doping yourself up on analgesics. If your knee/ankle/whatever really hurts, you may be worsening your injury by trying to push through it. The drugs may make it not hurt (or not hurt as much), but they don't keep you from injuring yourself more. Turning a sprain into a tear will sideline you a lot longer than taking it easy for a few days.

Quote:
Apres-ski beer or a-beverage of your choice to be adminstered orally. It will not do squat for your knees :, but if taken in sufficient dosage you will no longer care about the ouch !!!!! :
Ethanol is very effective -- but don't combine alcohol with these drugs, especially Tylenol. The interaction is toxic to your liver. If you're going to go out drinking, make sure it's at least 10-12 hours after taking Aleve and 3-4 hours after taking any Tylenol or Advil.

Edit: Just noticed this in the last post:

Quote:
3 advil 4x daily start 2 days before you head out so it builds in system.
That's a pretty high dosage of ibuprofen for most people. If you're doing it for just a few days, that's probably fine, but it might not be a good idea to do that for a long time. Definitely check with your doctor before you start exceeding the recommended dosage limits on an OTC medication or taking something continually for more than a few days in a row.
post #14 of 25
A prescription doseage of Advil is 800mg. My ortho said to take 4 regular (200mg) for the same effect as a prescription ibuprofen. 3x a day when stressing the knee.

His is a skier, Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon, and has a focus on the knee and sports medicine in his practice.

My left knee is hurt from a a car accident and has been abused playing hockey, all many moons ago, and as such it is suceptable to osteoarthritis.


Thank God my right knee is fine. ( for now!)
post #15 of 25
I like Alleve---lasts longer than Ibuprofen. Careful if you have GERD, ulcers, Barrett's, kidney problems. Ice and EtOH when all else fails.
post #16 of 25
Sure you can take ibupropin or naproxin but I use neoprene. Buy a couple of neoprene knee supports at your local drugstore. I've been wearing them on every ski day for the past 3 seasons and my knee pain is a thing of the past.
post #17 of 25
This is going to sound completely crazy but if the problem is stiffness from the cold (could be a little arthritis popping up) and not from a major injury (ligament/cartilage), increasing the circulation will make them loosen up and feel better. The best remedy I've ever used to loosen up is to take a spoonfull of horseradish and mix it with about a cup of olive oil. Let it sit for about 1/2 hour and then rub it on. Works 10 times better than menthol remedies like Ben Gay.
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gotama View Post
A prescription doseage of Advil is 800mg. My ortho said to take 4 regular (200mg) for the same effect as a prescription ibuprofen. 3x a day when stressing the knee.
im not a doc or vet but i play one in real life.
this is a anti-inflammatory dose and a blood level needs to be maintained to get that benefit so its not a one time thing. i start the day before and sometimes go for 15 day's.
If you really wont some relief from inflammation and the related pain try some horse liniment DSMO Google it Cleveland Clinic did a study. stuff works great i get it from vet supply cheaper than over the counter and cleaner than the solvent, thats right is also an industrial solvent.
post #19 of 25
In order of application (my own self-tested method for a bum right knee where I refuse to give up bump skiing):

While skiing:

1. Stretching and flexing before and during runs (i.e., while in lift lines);

2. Soft knee brace - the kind from ACE or made out of neoprene with a patellar hole. Good for compressing the knee and keeping it warm (will NOT prevent injury).

Apre-skiing:

1. Ice - if you can take it, place the bag of ice directly on the knee. Shift the bag from the sides to the top and back down the sides of the knee. You should feel cold all the way to the "inside" of the knee. Be careful not to frostbite the knee, though!

2. OTC anti-inflammatories like Naproxin Sodium (Aleve) or Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, Etc.). Three to four usually do it for me (200mg x 3 or 4 = 600mg to 800mg).

3. Glass of wine or beer (but not too much!).


4. Lots of rest.
post #20 of 25
....just be REAL CAREFUL with tylenol (acetaminophen)...Very easy to overdose on, especially smaller individuals, and many products contain it...cold/flu elixirs, percocet, vicodin etc...not to mention the potential toxic combination with alcohol...Know of multiple instances of individuals with unwitting acetaminophen overdose resulting in requirement for liver transplant...
post #21 of 25

Warm Knees are Happy Knees.

Since my patrol days in Montana where I spent a lot of time on slow chair lifts in very cold weather I have been using simple neoprene sleeve knee covers. You can get them in sports equipment stores or the pharmacy dept. of big grocery stores. I just slip them over my long underwear so I can take them off at the end of the day with my boots before driving of going to the bar. They don't really provide much support, but they keep my knees toasty all day, which keeps the tendons, ligaments and joints more supple. For about $15 it's an easy way to keep your knees a little happier. I figure when things start to stretch my warm tendons and ligaments will go just a little farther before damage is done.
post #22 of 25
Daily
1. Stretch Hamstrings
2.stretch quads
3.i also stretch back for flexibility I do McKenzie stretchs

ALEVE

Then RICE @nite when it still bugs ya
R=Rest
I= Ice ,
C= Compression ( Neoprene knee brace ) and
E= Elevation
post #23 of 25
I have arthritis in one knee accompanied by a Baker's cyst. I've been using motrin and a brace. This is a relatively new problem for me and I don't like the reduction in on slope performance it is causing. Will probably see a knee doc this spring for the first time in a couple years.
post #24 of 25
I have found that anti-inflamatories are more effective when taken with fish oil capsules.

Karl
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by paulk View Post
Any recommendations for 'in emergency' situation, where you are on skiing vacation and your knees are getting sore? What works best? (I know it's a personal thing, but...)
Thanks in advance,
Paul
"I know it's a personal thing" is spot on. That's in large part because there is significant inter-individual variability in response to acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, ie. ibuprofen or Advil, naproxen or Aleve). In other words, what works well for one person may not work so well for the next, and there are physiological reasons for that variability. So if one of these agents fails to provide adequate relief, another one (from a different class) may work better.

Caveats: Most of these agents have a "ceiling effect", meaning that at some point, additional quantities will not provide any additional analgesia (but increasing doses will increase the risk of injury or adverse effects) Secondly, these agents typically have a narrow therapeutic dosing range, which means that there's relatively little difference between toxic and therapeutic doses. Thirdly, these agents can adversely affect a variety of organs and medical conditions

Bottom line: when used as directed on the label, these medicines are usually safe and effective, but generally they should not be mixed with each other, mixed with alcohol or other medications, taken in amounts above the recommended doses, or used in the presence of liver, digestive, clotting, or kidney diseases.

I hope that helps.
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