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How to apply Swix GlideWax to new skis

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I bought new skis want try them out tomorrow. The shopowner gave me GlideWax but I don't know how to properly apply it. Should I let it set up for a few minutes before before I wipe it off? Do I use a cloth or other means to wipe it down? I saw the demo on the Swix site and they recomended using a cork for their liquid wax. I couldn't find a demo on universal glide wax, I'm wondering if it's the same type of wax. Any help would be appreciated.
post #2 of 13
Uh, a bit unclear, are you using liquid or solid? Somehow I have the impression you have the pink solid stuff?

I assume you are not ironing it in?
post #3 of 13
Here's some generic Wax Application Procedures which should apply to thta 'stuff' you're using :.

Assuming it's a paste or liquid, typical you ought to let the solvent evaporate and then let the wax harden. If you use the cork while in semi-fluid state it helps to push the wax into the base and the friction heat created from the cork is essentially a low level manual iron.

Using an iron to heat your liquid or paste/cream glide wax should increase it's durability.

HTH
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
The kind I have is a flourinated paste wax. It looks like an iron is the best bet so far. Has anybody tried a hot air gun to heat the wax after it is applied? Does the wax simply need heat to penetrate the base, or does it need heat and pressure?
post #5 of 13
The basic premise behind paste, liquid and rub on waxes is that they are quick and easy applications with little mess compared to hot waxing solids. The trade off is their durability. Depending on the manufacturer and grade of wax, the durability varies, but the paste and rub ons probably penetrate less than liquids and then hot waxed solids. Adding heat to any wax increases penetration. There was a thread on trying hot air for pastes and rub ons you might search for. I'd be concerned about heat regulation as I'm not sure you can gauge it but may be a trial and error thing. A waxing iron is easy to control.

If you don't worry about the heat you'll just need to to reapply the paste more often....like at a lunch break or something.

HTH
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Terry,

I found the thread about hot boxes and hot air - lots of ways to do it. I think I'm going to follow your advice and simply use the paste wax after a day of fun. It looks like there's quite an art to waxing that may far exceed my skiing abilities anyway. I would simply like to curtail damage/wear to my new skis.

Jeff
post #7 of 13
Jeff,

there are umpteen dozen ways to tune and there are umpteen thousand recipes to cook food with. In either case, no matter what your skiing or gastronomic ability, it is worthwhile doing what you can because it makes the skiing (eating) more enjoyable, and you can get better at it, and you can adapt the tune or food to what you actually like.

The way I read your posts you're in a bit of a dilemma of where to start, and what to buy if you need to buy anything.

My suggestion would be to start just like you would with car wax:

apply, let dry, then polish with towel-rag

the next possible improvement would be to apply heat with a cork, thus:

apply, let dry, cork, then polish towel-rag

the next possible improvement would be to brush-polish, thus:

apply, let dry, cork, then polish with nylon brush

the next possible improvement would be to use more heat with a iron, thus:

apply, let cool, scrape, then polish with nylon brush

beyond that are specialty improvements that might be overkill for someone of modest ability in general, but might be a ski-day-saver for someone of modest ability in special situations (deep freeze, slush, rained-on-snow).

Is that a little bit clearer?
post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 
Comprex,

Thank you for the clarification! Your comments are exactly what I needed! Good progression of steps too!

I looked more closely at my skis today and noticed that they were a little lighter in color near the edges. So I put on the paste wax, let it dry and polished it with a diaper cloth to a shine.

At first I thought it went on like a car wax, but now I understand that most of it should stay on the skis. I think I wiped most of it off the first time I applied it - just like I apply carnuba to my car. I noticed marks that were left over from the sponge applicator and assume that this is normal for a paste.
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jmar View Post
. I noticed marks that were left over from the sponge applicator and assume that this is normal for a paste.
they should disappear with corking or other heating.
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jmar View Post
The kind I have is a flourinated paste wax. It looks like an iron is the best bet so far. Has anybody tried a hot air gun to heat the wax after it is applied? Does the wax simply need heat to penetrate the base, or does it need heat and pressure?
Hot air guns can be trouble. The issue is how hot. It's possible to heat the base to the point that you reduce it's porosity... you actually close the pores by melting them shut, and the ski is not going to accept wax anymore. Time for a grind.

You can do it with an iron too, but it's safer. Try not to heat any area on the ski for more that 15 seconds, and use the lowest temp on the iron that will melt the wax. Keep the iron moving. I was told, if you can leave a 4" trail of wet wax, your doing ok.

Any comments on the length of the molten wax river trailing the iron?
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jmar View Post
Comprex,
At first I thought it went on like a car wax, but now I understand that most of it should stay on the skis. I think I wiped most of it off the first time I applied it - just like I apply carnuba to my car.
It should be more IN your base and not ON your base. You do want to wipe excess off; excess wax can slow you.
post #12 of 13
Good reminder Doctor D.

Additionally, it is best to apply fluoros over a paraffin/hydrocarbon only base to avoid drying out the base over time. Regardless, I'd want to have a base wax on/in my bases below rub-ons and pastes/creams since they do not saturate and adhere as well as a high melt liquid or hot waxed solid or high melt liquid.

For the short run and general applications, the rub ons/paste/cream approach is better than nothing IMO and can be very satisfactory, but throwing in a hot waxing cycle every once in a while is probably a good idea, especially with new skis or snowboards.
post #13 of 13
I hot scrape and hot wax weekly. The bases are fast and very durable - no sign of the dreaded grey base.
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