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Ski hill legends/mythology

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
A while back I happened upon the wikipedia entry for my home hill, Wilmot Mountain, and saw this :

Quote:
Wilmot Mountain was famous among Science Fiction fans for WilCon, a private invitation only Science Fiction convention hosted at the mountain by Jon and Joni Stopa over July 4th weekends. Guests still tell of the dozens of tents, acres of parties, special guests and unforgettable hospitality of their hosts. Legend has it that Leonard Nimoy has hidden a buried treasure somewhere on the property, capable of being found only by true, worthy believers.
I thought it was pretty random that a tiny local Midwestern hill with a vintage (or dilapidated depending on your perspective) feel had a legend of buried treasure, courtesy of Leonard Nimoy no less. What are my chances of being a true, worthy believer? Will a major wipe out lead me to inadvertently dig up sci fi gold?

What mountain/ski hill related legends or myths do you guys know about? Any grand tales from your home hill?
post #2 of 29
Mt.Shasta,Ca. now that hill has some tales. UFO's,tunnels inside the Mt.,ect.
post #3 of 29
> What mountain/ski hill related legends or myths do you guys know about?

Supposedly you can still get a $3 hamburger someplace on the mountain at MJ, but no one I know has ever actually found one.
post #4 of 29
Here is a good piece of ski related mythology....

There are some people that actually believe there is such a thing as a "factory" tune, or "factory" edge bevels. These believers think that there is some degree of accuracy and consistency between all the skis that a manufacturer produces, and they try to find out what the "factory" bevels are, and have their local shop replicate the original tune.

More reasonable people simply tune their skis at a 1 degree base and 3 degree side bevel.
post #5 of 29
Fernie BC has the legend of "Griz."
post #6 of 29
How 'bout the myth of "packed powder"?
post #7 of 29
And the mysterious "Good" and "adequate" conditions
post #8 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by U.P. Racer View Post
Here is a good piece of ski related mythology....

There are some people that actually believe there is such a thing as a "factory" tune, or "factory" edge bevels. These believers think that there is some degree of accuracy and consistency between all the skis that a manufacturer produces, and they try to find out what the "factory" bevels are, and have their local shop replicate the original tune.

More reasonable people simply tune their skis at a 1 degree base and 3 degree side bevel.
LOL, I've always been under the impression that skis are shipped a little base high to prevent them from damaging one another in stacks
post #9 of 29
We have the legend of Craig Kelley.
post #10 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woops View Post
> What mountain/ski hill related legends or myths do you guys know about?

Supposedly you can still get a $3 hamburger someplace on the mountain at MJ, but no one I know has ever actually found one.
Where is this mythical MJ?
post #11 of 29
I suppose the bomber at Mission Ridge counts, though I guess it's not a "legend" in that it's a verifiably true story 'n' all.
post #12 of 29
post #13 of 29
In case you have been waiting breathlessly for this year's Darwin
Awards, here they are. The awards this year are, once again, truly
classic.
These awards are given each year to bestow upon (the remains or
estate of) that individual, who through single-minded self-sacrifice,
has done the most to remove undesirable elements from the human
gene pool. Just think...until these events, these same people were
walking the streets like normal people.
5th RUNNER-UP:
Goes to a San Anselmo, California man who died when he hit a lift
tower at the Mammoth mountain ski area while riding down the slope
on a foam pad. 22-year old David Hubal was pronounced dead at
Central Mammoth Hospital. The accident occurred about 3 a.m., the
Mono County Sheriff's department said.
Hubal and his friends apparently had hiked up a ski run called Stump
alley and removed some yellow foam protectors from lift towers, said
Lt. Mike Donnelly of the Mammoth Lakes Police Department. The pads
are used to protect skiers who might hit towers. The group apparently
used the pads to slide down the ski slope and Hubal crashed into a
tower. It has since been investigated and determined the tower he hit
was the one with its pad removed.
post #14 of 29
Claim: Senator John Kerry referred to a Secret Service agent as a "son of a
bitch."
Status: True.
While snowboarding in Ketchum, Idaho, Senator Kerry was knocked over by
one of the Secret Service men assigned to protect him. According to The New
York Times, "Mr. Kerry [was] taken out by one of the Secret Service men, who
had inadvertently moved into his path, sending him into the snow." A reporter
and camera crew, who were following on skis, witnessed the collision but did
not capture it on film.
When asked about the crash, the Senator said, "I don't fall down. That son
a-bitch ran into me." Or "knocked me over," depending on which version you
heard.

Sorry, maybe this belongs in the "Intentional Collisions" thread...
post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by U.P. Racer View Post
Here is a good piece of ski related mythology....

There are some people that actually believe there is such a thing as a "factory" tune, or "factory" edge bevels. These believers think that there is some degree of accuracy and consistency between all the skis that a manufacturer produces, and they try to find out what the "factory" bevels are, and have their local shop replicate the original tune.

More reasonable people simply tune their skis at a 1 degree base and 3 degree side bevel.
POTD
post #16 of 29

The legend of the Mission Ridge Bomber wing.......

True story! Read down through the history of the ski hill and how it started snowing after a long drought when the wing was returned to hill.

http://www.missionridge.com/company_...ion_ridge.html

I always make it a point to go over and touch the wing when I ski Mission.....(the hill where I joined the busted ACL club)
post #17 of 29
I'll be skiing at Mission next month, most probably. I'll make sure I get over to the wing.

On US 2 heading to Stevens Pass from the West side of the mountains there is a short tunnel. Ullr lives in that tunnel and skiers should pray for snow by honking their horn as they pass through. Both directions!
post #18 of 29
I heard a mountain myth the other day....some guy actually paid full price for a lift ticket. No bro discount, no voucher, no chamber pass, no hook-up, no vacation package discount, no PSIA or NSP deal, no lame-o ski.com voucher....actually paid full price.

Ski patrol and the rescue dogs are still searching....
post #19 of 29

Headless Ed

HEADLESS ED:

There is a defunct ski area in Colorado that was called Geneva Basin. It is at the summit of Guanella Pass. There is a story about Ed Guanella (the son of the guy who the pass is named for). Ed Guanella was working at Geneva Basin helping string cable for a new lift. The cable snapped, lashed out like a whip and severed Ed's head. Legend has it that the ghost of Ed can be seen at the top of the mountain looking for his head.
post #20 of 29
People with hypertension should go to Billy's Giant Hamburger's in Jackson, WY. You have such a good time in Billys, that your blood pressure will go down by 10 points.
post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by faber View Post
I heard a mountain myth the other day....some guy actually paid full price for a lift ticket.

No bro discount, <not available here>
no voucher, < <not available here>
no chamber pass, <not available here>
no hook-up, <not available here>
no vacation package discount,<not available here>
no PSIA or NSP deal,
no lame-o ski.com voucher<not available here>

....actually paid full price.
Over 99% of all visitors here pay full price.
post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry_Morgan View Post
Over 99% of all visitors here pay full price.
Sorry to hear that. You shouldn't have to.

If a call to your friendly HR folks doesn't turn up employee wellness program gold, then call the mountain and ask them what discounts are available. Guess what...they will tell you. Sometimes it's ordering them through a website and printing off the voucher; sometimes you buy them at a local store (ski shop, or a grocery store, or even a radio station); sometimes a chamber of commerce has discounts available; sometimes it's just for the asking. It's ridiculously easy to get.

But if you want to pay full price, that's different.
post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by faber View Post
Sorry to hear that. You shouldn't have to.

If a call to your friendly HR folks doesn't turn up employee wellness program gold, then call the mountain and ask them what discounts are available. Guess what...they will tell you. Sometimes it's ordering them through a website and printing off the voucher; sometimes you buy them at a local store (ski shop, or a grocery store, or even a radio station); sometimes a chamber of commerce has discounts available; sometimes it's just for the asking. It's ridiculously easy to get.

But if you want to pay full price, that's different.
No, you don't understand. There are almost NO discounts of any kind at WA ski areas for daily lift tickets. At least there aren't at the places I ski.

Once and a while you'll see one, but they are so lame that they're not worth looking at most of the time. The last one I saw had something to do with a discount with a tank of gas, but you had to be there on a particular day. Otherwise you can look all you want, but they don't exist.

Tickets are not available off mountain for most places like they are for big resorts, you just have to line up at the window when you get there.

I've been skiing the WA Cascades for 44 years, so I imagine I would have heard of sweet deals if there were any. If I'm wrong, somebody educate me!
post #24 of 29
Washington ski resorts recognize PSIA. Usually 20-50% discounts. Now Crystal went all out and gives a $1.00 discount. <Not complain just say'n.
post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by faber View Post
Sorry to hear that. You shouldn't have to.

If a call to your friendly HR folks doesn't turn up employee wellness program gold, then call the mountain and ask them what discounts are available. Guess what...they will tell you. Sometimes it's ordering them through a website and printing off the voucher; sometimes you buy them at a local store (ski shop, or a grocery store, or even a radio station); sometimes a chamber of commerce has discounts available; sometimes it's just for the asking. It's ridiculously easy to get.

But if you want to pay full price, that's different.
No, you don't understand. There are almost NO discounts of any kind at WA ski areas for daily lift tickets. At least there aren't at the places I ski.

Once and a while you'll see one, but they are so lame that they're not worth looking at most of the time. The last one I saw had something to do with a discount with a tank of gas, but you had to be there on a particular day. Otherwise you can look all you want, but they don't exist.

Tickets are not available off mountain for most places like they are for big resorts, you just have to line up at the window when you get there.

I've been skiing the WA Cascades for 44 years, so I imagine I would have heard of sweet deals if there were any. If I'm wrong, somebody educate me!


Ditto here. I live 180 miles from any resorts. I work at a large global company with TONS of discount packages to ski areas in about every other state along with amusement parks, sports tickets etc. But, skiing around here is not in high demand so advertisers and marketing companies don't use it as a vehicle for other product offers/exposure opportunities.
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by faber View Post

But if you want to pay full price, that's different.
Most do. They walk up to the ticket window and say "I want a lift ticket for $35."
post #27 of 29
But we digress.

Komo Kulshan, a very tall and handsome young man, had two wives, as was the custom of his tribe. One was named Clear Sky; the other, Fair Maiden.
For several years Clear Sky was Kulshan's favorite wife. She was the more beautiful of the two, and she had borne him three children. Fair Maiden was less beautiful, but she was always gentle and kind.
At last she won Kulshan's love through kindness, though as a result she gained Clear Sky's dislike. Clear Sky had a jealous and bitter nature. Soon there was quarreling in the lodge.

One day Clear Sky scolded Komo Kulshan at great length and concluded,
"You should love me more than Fair Maiden. I am the mother of your children."
Kulshan smiled and said nothing.
Clear Sky became angrier.
"I'm going away," she said. "I'll leave you and the children and go away."
She expected him to answer, "Don't go away. You're the mother of my children, and I love you most. Don't go."

But Kulshan did not beg her to stay. Though he loved her and didn't want her to leave, he was too proud to say so. Instead he told her,
"If you want to, you may go as soon and as far as you wish."

Slowly, taking her time, Clear Sky packed her things. She packed all her seeds and bulbs, packed her roots and berries, packed all her flowering plants.
At last she was finished, and her children cried loudly when they saw her leaving. This pleased Clear Sky, who felt sure that Kulshan would call her back when she had gone a little distance.

She started down the mountain valley slowly, alone. When she had gone a short distance, she stopped and looked back.
But Kulshan did not say, "Come home."

She went a little farther and paused on a hill to look back at Kulshan and the children. When she stood on tiptoe, she could see them.
But still Kulshan did not say, "Come back, Clear Sky."

She went on farther south. She was still among the hills and mountains, mountains not so high as Komo Kulshan. He still did not call her, though she stood on the very tips of her toes.

Farther south she climbed to the top of a high hill, rose on tiptoe, and made herself as tall as she could. That way she could just see Kulshan and the children, and they could see her.

By this time she had stretched herself so often that she had become much taller. Sure now that her husband did not want her to return, she decided to make camp where she was. At least on a clear day she would be able to see her family.
So she put down her packs and took out all the seeds and bulbs and roots. She planted them around her, and there she stayed, cultivating them.

Fair Maiden lived with Kulshan for a long time. One day she said to him:
"I want to visit my mother. I'm going to have a baby, and I want to see my mother."
"How can you go to your mother?" asked Kulshan. "There's no trail, nothing but rocks and trees and mountains between us and Whulge."
"I don't know how I can get there, but you'll have to make a passageway for me. I want to see my mother."

So Komo Kulshan called together all the animals that have claws - the beavers, the marmots, the cougars the bears, even the rats and mice and moles - and told them to dig a big ditch.
The animals dug a deep one that was wide enough for two canoes to pass. Then Kulshan turned all the water from the mountains near him into the ditch until there was enough to float a fair-sized canoe.
Today the stream is called the Nooksack River.

Before starting, Fair Maiden gathered many kinds of food to take with her. Then she went down the river and out into the salt water of the Whulge.

She ate mussels at one of the islands and left some there. That's why mussels are found on the same island today.
She ate clams at another island and left some there.
She ate camas at another, and that's why a lot of camas grow on Matia Island today.
She ate devilfish and berries at another island and left some.
At every island on her journey she left some kind of fish or root or berry, and that's why the Indian names for these islands are the names or food.

When she got to Flat Top Island, she decided to stay somewhere near it. She stood looking over the water for a long time, trying to choose the best place. The winds blew round her tall figure and made a number of whirlpools. The whirlpools sucked many people in, even some who lived far away, and devoured them.

Fair Maiden kept on standing there, and the winds kept on blowing round her. At last the changer came to her and said,
"Why don't you lie down? If you stand, the winds will create whirlpools, and the whirlpools will suck all the people in."

So Fair Maiden lay down, and the Changer transformed her into Spieden Island. When her child was born, it was a small island of the same shape as Spieden and lying beside it.
Today it is called Sentinel Island.

Kulshan, left with his children in the mountains of the Northwest coastal range, kept stretching upward, trying to see his wives. So did his children.
The Three of them grew taller and taller and became high mountains. One is Shuksan, a little east of Kulshan and almost as tall. Some people say the others are Twin Sisters, a little west and south of Kulshan.

A long journey south of them stands their mother, Clear Sky.
You know her as Mount Rainier.
The seeds and roots she planted there grew and spread, and that's why the lower slopes bloom with flowers of every color. Often on a clear day or night, the mountain dresses in sparkling white and looks with longing at Komo Kulshan and the mountain children near him.
post #28 of 29
For those not from these parts, Komo Kulshan is Mt. Baker. Thanks for the retelling, Harry.
post #29 of 29
Spectacular! Thanks for taking all that time to narrate that tale ...

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