or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

MA for Dr. Rick - Page 2

post #31 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post

So the question is Dr. Rick:

Are you willing to start from scratch?

or

Would you prefer to build on what you know?
Start from scratch, I would think.

My rotary, one footed, weight on the outside ski, pivoting, sliding, skidding thing isn't a good base upon which to build a solid carve, imho. What do you think?

After some free-skiing this morning, Max put me on a pair of 140 cm Head Big Easy skis (turn radius 8 meters or so, I believe) and then took me through a series of drills. And so it happened: today I actually carved some turns. It was amazing, really; after many wobbly false starts, I finally committed to tipping my inside foot. Instead of falling over, as I fully expected to do, I found myself accelerating across the fall line with a surprising sensation of G force as both ski tips deflected into a tighter arc.

One small step, but a start, nonetheless.

(I see as I was writing this, Max got the real story in . Max, we're off for some Thai food; join us if you can).
post #32 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501 View Post
I'm trying to refrain myself from jumping into all of this pivot stuff. Fingers...stop...typing...d-o-n'-t...
Sorry Maxy. It was just 1 question. And Max thanks for restraining yourself.
post #33 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrooK View Post
Let's get some vid please I'd like to follow his development..
post #34 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Rick View Post

Anything and everything about my skiing: the good, the bad, and the ugly are all welcome.
Ugly? OK, you've got knock-knees like me.
post #35 of 66
Some nice tipping changes in vid #2. Bravo! (to both Dr. Rick and Max.)

Still don't trust your left leg, huh? I'm suspecting that's part of the reason for that left hand push across the body, and less/lack of tipping of the right foot to the little toe edge.

Great camera work, Max. If only I could keep it that steady.


Keep up the good work, Dr. Rick. It's nice to watch you ski. And improve!
post #36 of 66
Excellent carving Dr Rick
post #37 of 66
Hi Dr. Rick,

Since Tahoe isn't that far away from you, I would suggest heading down and see the people at AMSP for a clinic. Eski was my instructor at ESA Aspen, and the changes I needed to make were small, but significant, and have really helped so far. In my experience, one day of skiing with him was worth about 1 year of trying to figure things out on my own or getting free advice (much of which is contradictory at best, and incorrect or over-applied in many cases). At your level, it will be very beneficial to ski with a top instructor for a couple of days, and Eski is one of the best.

Regarding your video and some stuff I learned at ESA: It looks like you are skiing drill-like in that last video. You may want to get away from that. Eski wasn't high on drills at all during the clinic. He was all about showing us a move, giving us a groomer to practice it on, then applying it in tougher terrain, which works much better, IMO. It maintains your fluidity. I often see people who do too many drills, and they look rigid but "proper" on the groomers, yet fall apart at speed in rough terrain. I would recommend getting the feel of a move, then applying it in the crud. Good luck to you!
post #38 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501 View Post
What's next Max. Pulling the free foot under the hips ?
post #39 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
What's next Max. Pulling the free foot under the hips ?
Probably more work on tipping the inside ski and balance work on edges. Then more fore/aft work.
post #40 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post
Regarding your video and some stuff I learned at ESA: It looks like you are skiing drill-like in that last video.
No drills being demo'd in any of the vid. The last video is simply Rick's first time carving. This after drills to reduce his strong rotary and aft tendency.

Drills (or lack thereof) have alot to do with the skiers current movement pattern. If someone has a very strong bias the only way to get rid of it is to teach a new movement pattern and that comes from many runs of drills. Now, at your level, where the goal is minor adjustments its fine to show the move, test the move, and then bring it into real skiing without alot of drill work.
post #41 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baja View Post
Some nice tipping changes in vid #2. Bravo! (to both Dr. Rick and Max.)

Still don't trust your left leg, huh? I'm suspecting that's part of the reason for that left hand push across the body, and less/lack of tipping of the right foot to the little toe edge.

Great camera work, Max. If only I could keep it that steady.


Keep up the good work, Dr. Rick. It's nice to watch you ski. And improve!
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
Excellent carving Dr Rick
Thanks you guys: "nice" and "excellent" may be a bit too strong to describe those oh-so-wobbly turns, but I appreciate the encouragement. That video captured some of my very first carved turns.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post
Hi Dr. Rick,

Since Tahoe isn't that far away from you, I would suggest heading down and see the people at AMSP for a clinic. Eski was my instructor at ESA Aspen, and the changes I needed to make were small, but significant, and have really helped so far. In my experience, one day of skiing with him was worth about 1 year of trying to figure things out on my own or getting free advice (much of which is contradictory at best, and incorrect or over-applied in many cases). At your level, it will be very beneficial to ski with a top instructor for a couple of days, and Eski is one of the best.

Regarding your video and some stuff I learned at ESA: It looks like you are skiing drill-like in that last video. You may want to get away from that. Eski wasn't high on drills at all during the clinic. He was all about showing us a move, giving us a groomer to practice it on, then applying it in tougher terrain, which works much better, IMO. It maintains your fluidity. I often see people who do too many drills, and they look rigid but "proper" on the groomers, yet fall apart at speed in rough terrain. I would recommend getting the feel of a move, then applying it in the crud. Good luck to you!
Thanks, Dawg; I'm not all that far from you, either ; whaddya' say we hook-up here one of these days?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501 View Post
Probably more work on tipping the inside ski and balance work on edges. Then more fore/aft work.
Slave driver.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501 View Post
No drills being demo'd in any of the vid. The last video is simply Rick's first time carving. This after drills to reduce his strong rotary and aft tendency.

Drills (or lack thereof) have alot to do with the skiers current movement pattern. If someone has a very strong bias the only way to get rid of it is to teach a new movement pattern and that comes from many runs of drills. Now, at your level, where the goal is minor adjustments its fine to show the move, test the move, and then bring it into real skiing without alot of drill work.
As Max has pointed-out, those weren't the drills. Actually, I'm thankful Max had the courtesy not to shoot the drills, one of which had me grabbing my ankles (or boot tops) while dawdling done the bunny slope. And as undignified as that was, I think Max has got me on the right track; I believe that much, if not most of what I must do is learn to abandon my old movement patterns and "reprogram" new ones.

I won't be back on the mountain again until this Friday (that whole work thing, ya' know), but then I'll have a few days in which to keep pluggin' along as well as enjoy some of the fresh powder that's been falling.

I'll keep posting as I progress, and as I have said before, I welcome all comments, criticisms, and recommendations.
post #42 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Rick View Post

I'll keep posting as I progress, and as I have said before, I welcome all comments, criticisms, and recommendations.
Cool. Have fun. It would be good to ski with you again, since I haven't seen you around since Tahoe last spring. If those aren't your drills, just slow-speed movements, then I bet you will loosen up when you start feeling a bit more fluid. As Eski kept telling us: pedal the feet! If I can keep that in my head, then I will stay fluid. Otherwise, I tend to lose dynamic movement and have to use muscular force to change direction ( aggressive up-unweighting, pulling feet back ect.) which according to him, are unnatural corrective measures not necessary unless you fall behind the skis and need a quick fix. It looks like you are on that path already!
post #43 of 66
where do you find those nice empty trails? Nice improvement and yes, that darn left foot. Looks like that left hand drops and comes across the body in an effort to regain balance or weight the downhill foot. can't tell for sure but is there too much weight on the uphill foot when turning left to right? ( I remember doing those top of the boot grabs at beaver creek years ago with a swiss instructor! A bit scary on blues)
post #44 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
can't tell for sure but is there too much weight on the uphill foot when turning left to right?
Actually he is very outside ski dominant with a tendency to lift the inside ski quite often. Here he has worked hard to keep the inside ski in contact with the snow and weighted.
post #45 of 66
you would know better but why is the left leg stemming out (not sure if that's the right term)? he seems to have to pull it back in to match the uphill leg and does so by pulling that hand towards the right.
post #46 of 66
Thread Starter 
Much of what you see is simply the result of being new to balancing over an edged and carving ski. Sometimes different edge angles, too much weight here or there, getting too far back, letting the inside ski move too far forward, upper body movement not being in synch, etc.
post #47 of 66
. Now lets see the boot grabbing drill! Works much better with a heavy accented instructor who sounds a lot like Arnold behind you yelling , "grab your boot or I will beat you with my pole"
post #48 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
. Now lets see the boot grabbing drill! Works much better with a heavy accented instructor who sounds a lot like Arnold behind you yelling , "grab your boot or I will beat you with my pole"
No... this is how it goes:

In the thickest Austrian accent you can imagine:

"GRAAAB ZHE BOOOOOTZ!!!! You are zkiing too shlow! You zki like a gurly-maan! Zki fahzter! GRAAAB YOUR BOOOTZ GURLY-MAAN!!!! Zis is NO WAY to zki! Do you zhink zis is fun!? You zhink zhis is fun!!?!? ZHIS IS NOT FUN!! GURLY-MAAN! GRAAB ZHE BOOOTZ!!!"

:

Thats how I learn anyway.
post #49 of 66

So true!

Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
No... this is how it goes:

In the thickest Austrian accent you can imagine:

"GRAAAB ZHE BOOOOOTZ!!!! You are zkiing too shlow! You zki like a gurly-maan! Zki fahzter! GRAAAB YOUR BOOOTZ GURLY-MAAN!!!! Zis is NO WAY to zki! Do you zhink zis is fun!? You zhink zhis is fun!!?!? ZHIS IS NOT FUN!! GURLY-MAAN! GRAAB ZHE BOOOTZ!!!"

:

Thats how I learn anyway.

No joke, Greg!

I took an instructor clinic with an Austrian instructor years ago. I'll never forget it.

We were all waiting in a group, he comes over to us, looks us all up and down, and went right around the group...


"You need GS skis. And you need GS skis. You... you zere... you need GS skis. And you need GS skis."

He was Mr. Personality. :


"Okay." ::click:: ::click:: "Ve go."


He takes off and just disappears.

None of us can keep up. The first few of us are hauling to try and find him. We come around a bend, and he's at the bottom of a long stretch, propping himself up with one of his poles under his butt cheek, looking like he's been waiting there for an hour. As we get closer, he waves us toward him one at a time with those quick "come-un-zee-here" hand motions.

He ripped into us all morning long.


"Vy do you Americans keep stoppink? Zere is no stoppink in skiing. You ski!

Down. You ski down ze hill.

Vat is zis stoppink? --- you stop to see zat's it's OK, or zat it's not OK?

NO! You ski DOWN!

Down ve go!"


More yelling at us throughout the morning... turns are too small, going too slow...


So one guy in our group says under his breath...


"Gimme a break... I'm on rental skis here."


Heinrich (or whatever his name was) stops on a dime, turns with the snap-click posture of a Marine drill instructor, and pulls his goggles up:


"Ahhhhh! So... ve blame it on ze skis, yah?"

Some of us are holding back laughter, just from the accent.


"So... you zere... za next time you coam heeyah, you bring your skis and your boots.... und ZEN vat vill be ze excuse, hah?"


Fond memories.


I, too, vote to see Dr. Rick do the boot grabbing drill.
post #50 of 66
Thread Starter 
Doc skiing on spats in deep (4.5') heavy snow. We had great lines all day. Sorry for the low quality, its from my treo.

post #51 of 66
Max and I were on our "rockers" all day, and it was an absolute blast; he was riding his Praxis' and I was on my "Spats." As Max said, with all the snow coming down, we had great lines, but riding a reverse camber and sidecut ski is probably not the best way to work on my carving. Of course, that didn't stop Max from laying some arcs.

I'm going to try and hit some groomers early today on my "normal" skis and hopefully lay some arcs of my own, but gosh darn it, we've got a heavy snow advisory up all the way through tomorrow morning
post #52 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baja View Post
Still don't trust your left leg, huh? I'm suspecting that's part of the reason for that left hand push across the body, and less/lack of tipping of the right foot to the little toe edge.
I think this left side move stems from a long-standing strength and flexibility inequity between left and right. We all have dominant sides, and the natural tendency is to favor that side. In Dr. Rick's case, it looks like his right side is stronger, and he favors it and gets a more immediate result: better counter, better feel for the snow, etc. On the left side, the counter and angles don't materialize as easily, and the hand comes around to compensate for this (the result being rotation that kills the angles that are starting to develop). Given that the hand motion seems to be ingrained into all aspects of Dr. Rick's skiing, my guess is that this has been going on for years and is simply part of the muscle memory.

The drills you did are a good start, for sure. I'd also add some good, old-fashioned pole balancing drills to get your hands in order:

- Balance your poles across your wrists and don't let 'em fall off.

- Do some rotary twists, where you aim your shoulders down the fall line and rotate your skis around, while tracking a straight slip down the fall line.

- Work on the tip in longer radius turns. This'll work two things: your tip and carve initiation, as well as working a bit outside your comfort zone (it seems that you like shorter turns, Dr. Rick).

One other thing, and a question for Dr. Rick: have you had your boots properly fitted and aligned? The left-side discrepancy can also stem from an improperly-aligned boot that doesn't allow you to get a proper edge engagement. It's worth a look-see, for sure. If you haven't had it done and are going to be in the north Tahoe region, it'd be worth getting in contact with Bud Heishman for some boot "surgery."

But all things being equal, there's a nice change in the before and after videos. And I'm sure that, given additional drill work and gaining confidence in the carve, you'll make huge improvements!
post #53 of 66
Yesterday was a pure "rocker" day (lots and lots of snow), but today it was back to tipping to carve. Max took me through a number of drills aimed at getting me to be more patient in my transitions, as I'm used to sensing an immediate change in direction with my rotary movement. That and pulling my inside ski/foot back (it drifts forward) were what we worked on today. Sorry, but no video.

More later in the week...
post #54 of 66
What kind of instructor are you Max?
post #55 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrooK View Post
What kind of instructor are you Max?
Just a friend helping a friend.
post #56 of 66
Thread Starter 
Dr. Rick was making very nice carved turns this afternoon. He looked like a different skier! Well done Doc.
post #57 of 66
Vid vid vid!
post #58 of 66
Dr Rick, I see something interesting... a strongly favored side.

Watching each of the early clips I see a consistent pattern:

With each right turn the skier's left arm comes inward and close to the belly button with a reasonable flexion/angulation pattern developing; With each left turn the right arm stays out to the front and side, less counter develops, and less flex/angulation occurs (in general).

I also see most right turns as being pretty well completed but many of the left turns seem somewhat unfinished. Essentially, the skis come more across the fall-line in each right turn but not so much in many of the left turns.

The skier seems to commit fully to making right turns with the whole body involved, but only commits partially to making left turns. I notice many left turns also seem rushed. Just a general observation across all clips collectively.

I would suggest doing some garlands to the right (series of right turns) and get the feel of what you're doing really well, then make a series of left turns and try to replicate a mirror of that working pattern.

.ma
post #59 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by songfta View Post
I think this left side move stems from a long-standing strength and flexibility inequity between left and right. We all have dominant sides, and the natural tendency is to favor that side. In Dr. Rick's case, it looks like his right side is stronger, and he favors it and gets a more immediate result: better counter, better feel for the snow, etc. On the left side, the counter and angles don't materialize as easily, and the hand comes around to compensate for this (the result being rotation that kills the angles that are starting to develop). Given that the hand motion seems to be ingrained into all aspects of Dr. Rick's skiing, my guess is that this has been going on for years and is simply part of the muscle memory.
Most definitely.

Quote:
The drills you did are a good start, for sure. I'd also add some good, old-fashioned pole balancing drills to get your hands in order:

- Balance your poles across your wrists and don't let 'em fall off.

- Do some rotary twists, where you aim your shoulders down the fall line and rotate your skis around, while tracking a straight slip down the fall line.
Thanks; I think the drills may help me "unlearn" my (very) old movement patterns

Quote:
- Work on the tip in longer radius turns. This'll work two things: your tip and carve initiation, as well as working a bit outside your comfort zone (it seems that you like shorter turns, Dr. Rick).
Excellent advice; I've been doing that for much of this week.

Quote:
One other thing, and a question for Dr. Rick: have you had your boots properly fitted and aligned? The left-side discrepancy can also stem from an improperly-aligned boot that doesn't allow you to get a proper edge engagement. It's worth a look-see, for sure. If you haven't had it done and are going to be in the north Tahoe region, it'd be worth getting in contact with Bud Heishman for some boot "surgery."
Max has been wondering the same thing, but I had new beds and an alignment done earlier this season*, so I'm not yet ready to blame my equipment for what might be an ingrained movement pattern. There was a brief time when an "A-frame" was thought to be way cool, and I learned to emphasize that move. I'm trying to unlearn it now. If it and the asymmetry continues to plague me despite my best efforts, I'll get another alignment done.

Quote:
But all things being equal, there's a nice change in the before and after videos. And I'm sure that, given additional drill work and gaining confidence in the carve, you'll make huge improvements!
Thanks again for the advice and encouragement.

Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelA View Post
Dr Rick, I see something interesting... a strongly favored side.

Watching each of the early clips I see a consistent pattern:

With each right turn the skier's left arm comes inward and close to the belly button with a reasonable flexion/angulation pattern developing; With each left turn the right arm stays out to the front and side, less counter develops, and less flex/angulation occurs (in general).

I also see most right turns as being pretty well completed but many of the left turns seem somewhat unfinished. Essentially, the skis come more across the fall-line in each right turn but not so much in many of the left turns.

The skier seems to commit fully to making right turns with the whole body involved, but only commits partially to making left turns. I notice many left turns also seem rushed. Just a general observation across all clips collectively.

I would suggest doing some garlands to the right (series of right turns) and get the feel of what you're doing really well, then make a series of left turns and try to replicate a mirror of that working pattern.

.ma
Thanks, Michael; you're absolutely right. There's clearly considerable asymmetry in my movement patterns, and it's part of what Max is trying to help me fix.

After days of snow and icy fog, today was a wonderful bluebird day. Instead of heading for the pow, however, I spent the late morning and early afternoon doing drills and long-radius turns, and then later in the day I hooked up with Max and some other pals, and tried tipping in soft bumps and on some slightly steeper terrain.

Max has been extraordinarily helpful and very patient with me, and I think my skiing is getting better.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GrooK View Post
Vid vid vid!
Coming, if Max is able and the weather holds tomorrow.

*Before he started working on me over the course of several days, the boot-fitter quipped that "with those feet and that alignment, you really should be snowboarding" (He was joking; he doesn't care for snowboarders).
post #60 of 66

What a difference a day makes...

...at least at Bachelor. Saturday was arguably the best day of the year so far, with blue skies and great snow. Yesterday was probably the worst: fog, and wet drizzle. The parking lots, ski racks, and day lodges were full, and the mountain was empty. I got most of my runs almost completely to myself, having to stop every 100 yards or so to squegee my googles. Not a good day for video.

Today looks to be another bluebird day, but I've got to go to work. It's possible but not likely that I'll get out on the hill this week (as I'm on call now, and the inpatient service is, quite frankly, rather "ugly"); so more than likely Max's next chance to post video won't be until next Monday. I'll try to get something shot before then if I can break away for a few hours; otherwise, we'll have to wait until next week. That's too bad for me, really, as I'm anxious to get some more feedback after making some changes to my skiing over the past week.

Thanks again for all the comments and critiques, and I hope you all will be willing to add some more once new video is up.

Rick
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching