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Issues with GS skis

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I'm new to the whole racing scene, but I've been skiing all mountain skis for years. I just bought a pair of head GS skis and I have no idea how to handle them. They are 185 length and have a 23.8 M carving radius, but I am skiing in the USCSA southeast conference where GS courses tend to be laid out very tight and slow. It feels like I'm spending half the course getting the skis up to enough speed to really set a decent carve. Can anyone offer some advice on how to set the skis more aggresively and get a tighter turn?
post #2 of 19

change your location to the southwest circuit...

go to youcanski.com for ad decent explanation of a user guide.
post #3 of 19

Right tools

For the right job.

Depending on your heigh weight etc and "new to racing", unless you are a big hunk, I think you have the wrong tools.

Tighter shorter GS courses tend to lend themselves better to downsized race bred equipment where a little more sidecut and shorter length allow more potential for "corrections" during your short run.

For example, I am on Ficher WC 175s. >21 R. 5'9" 175#. Athletic.

The boards you desribe will run great but you gotta let the dogs out. It is prob not "you" as much as it is the physics of the course and ski.

That is a LOT of ski for a new racer in beer league. Who talked you into those? Again, are you BIG?
post #4 of 19
Get a pair of SL ski's (if you're allowed to run those in that GS).
post #5 of 19
USCSA adopts USSA rules, meaning that a 27m 185+ ski is NOT required until the 2008/2009 competition season. A 180cm ski with a sub-27m radius would suffice.

...just a thought.
post #6 of 19

Re: Issues w/ GS skis

Quote:
Originally Posted by jrichatvt View Post
I'm new to the whole racing scene, but I've been skiing all mountain skis for years. I just bought a pair of head GS skis and I have no idea how to handle them. They are 185 length and have a 23.8 M carving radius, but I am skiing in the USCSA southeast conference where GS courses tend to be laid out very tight and slow. It feels like I'm spending half the course getting the skis up to enough speed to really set a decent carve. Can anyone offer some advice on how to set the skis more aggresively and get a tighter turn?
Jrichavt,

I'm assuming you ski for tech, I also used to ski for tech and recently graduated (I'm the guy that establised dirty south ski racing) If you're racing on A team then I might worry about length, because some of the people at regionals may protest (only if you beat them) but for the most part you really don't need to conform to the specs. Even though USCSA has adopted the USSA rules for the upcoming season this won't be enforced in conference races (never has been). What I wouldn't do is race a GS in SL skis. I realize a lot of people do it, but as a current coach, a former racer and former ski rep I can tell you the skis aren't designed for that and you won't be as fast as you would with a shorter or softer GS ski. If I were you I'd get something around a 180. Training at Winterplace you'll never have much of an opportunity to turn anything much longer and the only race which you could turn a longer ski would be the Shoe or at regionals.
post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
thanks for all the advice, I am about 6'0", and 210 lbs so I'm big enough to handle the skis. I think racer 256 was probably right, as the last few races have been bigger, faster courses set more like a true GS and I have been doing alot better. I placed 4th in the B team GS race at Snowshoe where I finally felt comfortable on the skis. (I was in first after run 1, but dropped 3 places in the second run somehow...)
post #8 of 19

Gs

all you have to do (if you have the 416 or 614 bullet binding) is move the grey piece at the front to the right and move the binding as far up in the front as it can go to extreme. This will make the ski turn more. It worked for me to i had the same problem and if you have the neox binding get rid of it because it has rollers at the toe piece and is useless.
post #9 of 19
Go to Atomic: That is a huge radius atomics radius is 19.5 for the 2008 and 2009 GS skiis
post #10 of 19
im 5"7 and im on a 183 it takes some time to get used to
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by bello66 View Post
Go to Atomic: That is a huge radius atomics radius is 19.5 for the 2008 and 2009 GS skiis
Those are not FIS conform skis.. He's talking about the racestock ski from Head.. Head doesn't make cheater skis do they?
post #12 of 19
i dont think so but atomic is the way to go. But if your looking for a stiff ski thats FIS go on rossignol RX worldcup 09 race skiis
post #13 of 19
A cheater ski from Head would be the Supershape series, and the non race stock/RD skis.
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by bello66 View Post
i dont think so but atomic is the way to go. But if your looking for a stiff ski thats FIS go on rossignol RX worldcup 09 race skiis
That's really a question of what he likes.. He could find very good cheater skis from both Atomic, Fischer, Völkl, Nordica, Rossignol, (I won't mention Salomon) And so on.. And the same goes with FIS skis.. It's all about finding what you like..
post #15 of 19
yea i agree but atomic is a very n ice riding ski and if you dont like a stiff ski (and want to be embarrased) go on the atomic LT 12's with the extra sheet of metal applied in the base
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrooK View Post
Those are not FIS conform skis.. He's talking about the racestock ski from Head.. Head doesn't make cheater (GS) skis do they?
They do as of this coming year. It's called the Head World Cup Speed and has an 18m turn radius. I just skied it two weeks ago and reviewed it here:

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=68128

jrichatvt: I think what you've been told so far (as well as what you've experienced) is completely correct. The race stock skis you're on right now have a pretty big turn radius for most of the "GS" courses you're probably going to see.

As long as your coaches and the officials don't care, you may want to consider having a cheater GS in your quiver next season so that you can use the "real" GS skis for open courses and the cheaters for tighter ones. If that's not an option, just work on getting better and better at bending the ones you've got into a carve.

(That's easy for *me* to say, of course. )

Good luck.
post #17 of 19
Hey Bob would this new Speed ski be a better choice than the current SS Speed for NASTAR?
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
Hey Bob would this new Speed ski be a better choice than the current SS Speed for NASTAR?
For *me*, it would.

I caveat that, however, with the observation that I was not a fan of the SS Speed. If you read through the other thread where I reviewed the World Cup Speed, you'll see that I was asked to compare the two skis.

I've only skied on the SS Speed once and didn't particularly like it, so I never hopped on it again. What's unknown is whether the reason I didn't like it had to do with tune, mounting point, or poor operator skills. I suspect we will never know the real answer.

Anyway, the World Cup Speed did exactly what I asked of it with no hesitation. I loved it and will have a pair next season. I think it would be great fun in a typical NASTAR.
post #19 of 19
Whatever you do, don't pick a SL for a GS, even if it's tight and turny: it just isn't designed to be skiied at GS speeds and you won't be able to have a clean carve for most of the turn.

Just practice feathering the start of the turn while freeskiing or buy something shorter/softer. BUt I'd prefer that a big guy like you ski the real ski. Sure it takes speed to make them come alive and that's why you should pole hard and know how to tuck the first or second gate.
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