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Poles or No Poles

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I was just wondering what everyone's opinion was on poles.
because i noticed a lot of people in freestyle don't use them.
Is there any particular reason?

does anyone her ride no poles for freestyle?
post #2 of 17
Thread Starter 
bump
helloooo?
post #3 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom borsari View Post
bump
helloooo?
Depends on what you mean by "freestyle". Do you mean:

Terrain park and halfpipe?

Aerials?

If that's what you mean, poles really don't add much to the equation so there's no major need to carry them.

Freestyle can also mean competition-like mogul skiing. In that case, I've hardly ever seen anyone ski without poles.

It could also, depending on your definition, mean big-mountain free skiing. In that case as well, I've never seen a good skier who didn't ride with poles.

Personally, I think the act of poling is very important for overall "regular" skiing.
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
for freestyle, i meant more in the jumping, pipe and rail kind of freestyle.

for example, in this video, sometimes he doesn't use poles
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GbbqzQW_-VY
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom borsari View Post
for freestyle, i meant more in the jumping, pipe and rail kind of freestyle.

for example, in this video, sometimes he doesn't use poles
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GbbqzQW_-VY
Whats your skill level? I think that if you are not very good at what you do it might be better to learn stuff without poles. One less thing to get hurt on, especially in the park. Its also excellent practise to ski without poles.
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
Its also excellent practise to ski without poles.
I was actually wondering about this. Why is it good practice to ski without poles? I've seen many kids and some adults ski without poles... what are they aiming to achieve? I guess with kids, it's one less thing to focus on, but what other value does it bring? I see all good skiers use poles in competition or not so I would have thought the aim to becoming a good skier was also to master the use of poles correctly.
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by muja2 View Post
I was actually wondering about this. Why is it good practice to ski without poles? I've seen many kids and some adults ski without poles... what are they aiming to achieve? I guess with kids, it's one less thing to focus on, but what other value does it bring? I see all good skiers use poles in competition or not so I would have thought the aim to becoming a good skier was also to master the use of poles correctly.
daah! I think I might be answering my own question here, now that I think about it. I guess you can ski without poles to improve your foot technique or at least work on legs and skis without worrying about poles?
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by muja2 View Post
daah! I think I might be answering my own question here, now that I think about it. I guess you can ski without poles to improve your foot technique or at least work on legs and skis without worrying about poles?
You are right in all what you say but no poles does not mean that you couldent ski like hell was on fire! Check this chick out:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5sGv...eature=related
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
You are right in all what you say but no poles does not mean that you couldent ski like hell was on fire! Check this chick out:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5sGv...eature=related
That is extreme
post #10 of 17
Some of the nice folks in Idea seem to go "poles optional" a decent amount of the time...

http://poorboyz.com/node/140
post #11 of 17
I leave my poles at the bottom when I jump.


My brother took one about 3/4 inch deep into his shin area. Lesson learned.
post #12 of 17
Some say that skiing without poles is not "skiing." I'm not good enough to comment on that. I do know, however, that as an intermediate I find my hand positions are better, and ski control is better, if I don't have poles to distract me.
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom borsari View Post
for freestyle, i meant more in the jumping, pipe and rail kind of freestyle.

for example, in this video, sometimes he doesn't use poles
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GbbqzQW_-VY
haha he happens to be from Mount Lebo in Pittsburgh. Tom Wallsich will be one of the next big faces in freeskiing, the kid can actually turn as well, despite his park rat background.
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by muja2 View Post
I was actually wondering about this. Why is it good practice to ski without poles? I've seen many kids and some adults ski without poles... what are they aiming to achieve? I guess with kids, it's one less thing to focus on, but what other value does it bring? I see all good skiers use poles in competition or not so I would have thought the aim to becoming a good skier was also to master the use of poles correctly.
Balance and stance.

I have taken poles away from a number of long-time skiers to help get their stance more functional. I took them away from a very good skier during a recent mogul clinic and watched his locked-together feet move apart to a much more functional stance. Not "wide", but nice and functional. He could ski the bumps just fine that way, but had to abandon his habitual feet-together stance that relied on the pole plant to maintain his balance and leverage the turn.

Besides, if you've seen Swing (aka Max, aka Mr. Edelwiser) ripping around sans poles on all terrain and conditions, you understand that they aren't needed. But, sometimes they do come in quite handy. That extra touch-point can really help with balance, even if it's a very light touch.
post #15 of 17
The French instructor I was talking with the other day actually claimed that the French instructors consider using poles on groomers not good looking and promote holding the arms very still in theire classes (keeping the arms forward with poles in the hands). In more challenging terrain they still use poleplant offcourse. Looking at the groomers at that point of the conversation, 99 % of the people were holding the arms steady indeed. A lot of intermediates, in my opinion, have trouble keeping balanced though and are struggling to get their arcs in good shape. This would be a lot easier IMO when correct poleplant is taught from the start.
post #16 of 17
I never ski with poles... but I'm not that great either.. Here's my take:

Beginner kids: The poles get in the way.
Beginner adults: Lots of fear/nerves usually, and they try to use them to stop.
Beginners in general: fall down and drop poles, get up, then can't reach poles... takes a lot of time. you also learn more efficient methods of getting back on your feet without the poles, and you are forced to improve your balance on skis, which with poles is not as critical.

I, personally, don't use poles because I don't like stoving my fingers and that seems to be the only thing poles do for me. ;p

I've seen a lot of people that's skiing has improved just by giving them poles... In a few specific cases, it seems to improve angulation and get rid of unneccessary banking. I'm no MA expert, but this is just observation from my slightly-less-trained-than-a-lot-of-people-here eye.
post #17 of 17
QmQ - I believe that in the situation you mention, dealing with intermediates, the pole plants may keep them from improving balance. In that situation, it seems to me that the poles are akin to training wheels. They make it possible for the person to balance, but the person's balance is not improving.
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