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Please Help Me Ski Powder!

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hi All,
I`m new here, thanks in advance for the help.

I`m looking for some advice for skiing in powder. I have been skiing for the bulk of my life, but I am from the midwest of the US and have very little experience in powder. I am currently living in an area in Japan which, I`m told, has some of the best powder in the world. The problem is that I wouldnt be able to tell because I apparently don`t know the first thing about skiing in powder. I`m an advance skier on flat, groomed snow, but the moment I get into powder It`s like it`s my first time on the slopes.

Could any of you offer some powder skiing advice to this poor mid-westerner? I`ve figured out that I needto keep my skis together to help me float over the snow, but I can`t do turns for the life of me.
What do turns feel like? Do powder turns take more or less muscle than turns on groomed hills?

Where Should my weight be in my boots. In my heels, or evenly distributed throughout my foot?

Thanks for the help!
post #2 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghaleon View Post
Hi All,
I`m new here, thanks in advance for the help.

I`m looking for some advice for skiing in powder. I have been skiing for the bulk of my life, but I am from the midwest of the US and have very little experience in powder. I am currently living in an area in Japan which, I`m told, has some of the best powder in the world. The problem is that I wouldnt be able to tell because I apparently don`t know the first thing about skiing in powder. I`m an advance skier on flat, groomed snow, but the moment I get into powder It`s like it`s my first time on the slopes.

Could any of you offer some powder skiing advice to this poor mid-westerner? I`ve figured out that I needto keep my skis together to help me float over the snow, but I can`t do turns for the life of me.
What do turns feel like? Do powder turns take more or less muscle than turns on groomed hills?

Where Should my weight be in my boots. In my heels, or evenly distributed throughout my foot?

Thanks for the help!

Ghaleon, welcome to Epic. Regarding skiing powder I can empathize completely having a similar problem. Go to Ask a Ski Pro in the instruction portion of Forums and look for Reluctance in Powder question from me. The answers were excellent and even inspiring.

I am not a powder expert by any means but in the learning phase. Start just going straight through, don't even try to turn, just get the feel. Other things I have learned, independent leg action skiing is bad, poles ready and in front Be pole ready, don't finish the turn too hard or you will end up in a traverse position and make the next turn harder. Ski on eggs, light and easy as possible. Also have the right skis will make all this easier. Keep your core down the hill in the fall line and speed is your friend. Pick your learning areas, i.e., start if you can on 6" freshies over a groomer that was groomed that night. Good luck, Pete
post #3 of 15
Rent fat soft skis. Loosen your boot cuff buckles a notch or two, as well as the power strap.

You want both feet together and equal weight on both feet. You want your weight centered on your foot. You only need your weight back in snow so wet and heavy that you won't reach the bottom of the hill otherwise.

You will ski more slowly due to the resistance of the snow against your feet, so ski more down the hill. You don't need a lot of speed, but you need enough speed so your momentum carries you into the next turn. You cannot make quick movements in that deep snow, so learn the tempo of movement the snow permits. You turn by putting your two skis together on edge. Visualize an airplane banking around a turn. Visualize your two skis together banking around a turn.

Practice two footed, equal weight, smooth rounded turns on groomed runs. As Pete says, practice this if there's some fresh snow over the groomed run. You'll have to make adjustments to your fore & aft balance in the deep snow...expect that, and keep your weight centered on your feet. You don't float over the snow. You're in the snow skiing in three dimensions. You don't need to see your skis until you finish the run.
post #4 of 15
having some fun at Silver Mtn. ....float and sting in the powder...........http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=d3_0ul9oEuE
post #5 of 15
The tip that helped me many long years ago was to think of my two skis as a single big plank of wood that I had to ride through the powder. Start by going straight down and making slight turns. Too much edge angle and you sink as you fall off the platform that is forming under your "plank".

Also don't worry if your skis disappear from sight; they're still there and they will still work.
post #6 of 15
post #7 of 15
The best tip I could give is that things get easier if you start going a bit faster.

Your legs will get tired, but if you point it down the hill a bit more there is way less need to try and muscle the skis or throw them around. Powder slows you down and is very forgiving when you fall anyways.

Just go try it some more, you'll get it.
post #8 of 15
One more time.....http://www.youtube.com/user/silvrfox53 float and sting in the powder
post #9 of 15
Silverfox....sweet! Duck rope and do heel push windshield wiper turns.
Looks like a quick way to lose your pass to me.
post #10 of 15
For me I ski deep powder all the time. You must have your feet a little wider apart. Ifr you dont the snow will buld up on your body and slow you down to much. You keep your feet shoulder width apart or a little less. Pick the line your going to ski down. Start going straight untill you have picked up enough speed to start turning. To turn just unwieght your legs and lean a little the direction you want to turn and you will turn. Make the turns nice slow arching turns not abrupt turns or like carve turns on groomed. Just slight movements each way you turn. Dont be agressive. Powder is like floating on a cloud. Very little resistance if its light powder. This will apply mostly if the powder is knee deep or more. The deeper it is the wider your stance. If its chest deep at least shoulder width so the snow will pass thew your legs. Your making me get exsided for Friday!!:
post #11 of 15
Beg to differ with whipper, but do NOT widen your stance or "lean in" to a turn. A narrower stance provides more float (think snowboard), and you really don't want to move your mass to the inside of the turn in powder. Stay centered over both skis.
post #12 of 15
Ghaleon,

Welcome to epic!

Quote:
I`m looking for some advice for skiing in powder.
Simple! Be at the mountain when it has snowed or is snowing. Relax, don't be afraid, go to an easier slope, point them down and keep moving on your skis. You'll figure it out. Don't tense up or lean back, flexing your ankle more than usual is where to begin. Feel how the skis behave while not reaching down for a solid surface. Think of skiing on the bases instead of the edges. Have fun!

RW
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghaleon View Post
Hi All,
I`m new here, thanks in advance for the help.

I`m looking for some advice for skiing in powder. I have been skiing for the bulk of my life, but I am from the midwest of the US and have very little experience in powder. I am currently living in an area in Japan which, I`m told, has some of the best powder in the world. The problem is that I wouldnt be able to tell because I apparently don`t know the first thing about skiing in powder. I`m an advance skier on flat, groomed snow, but the moment I get into powder It`s like it`s my first time on the slopes.

Could any of you offer some powder skiing advice to this poor mid-westerner? I`ve figured out that I needto keep my skis together to help me float over the snow, but I can`t do turns for the life of me.
What do turns feel like? Do powder turns take more or less muscle than turns on groomed hills?

Where Should my weight be in my boots. In my heels, or evenly distributed throughout my foot?

Thanks for the help!
I say if you but my airline ticket there. I'll teach ya how to ski powder.

Deal?
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by h2osnowfan View Post
Beg to differ with whipper, but do NOT widen your stance or "lean in" to a turn. A narrower stance provides more float (think snowboard), and you really don't want to move your mass to the inside of the turn in powder. Stay centered over both skis.
Im talking Powder not a skif of snow. If you try to ski DEEP powder up hear with your feet together youll be baried over your head and have lots of trouble breathing even with a mask on. Maybe with 120+ waisted skis you can have your feet a little more together but not with 100mm or less. Ya ya stay centered over your skis dont lean back ect. I dont know how to explain it then I just ski it 3-4 times a week: We get 4-9ft of fresh light powder every week. Its differant in the Deep Powder it wants to ride up your chest and and will barie you. If the powder isnt to deep you can ski with a narrower stance for sure. Other wise you need a wider stance to filter the snow away from your body. In the original thread he was talking best Powder in the world so we have some of the best also at PowderKing so I was preparing him for DEEP pow not just a foot or two. i forget that not every one skis powder as deep as we do
post #15 of 15
If it hadn't been said. You turn by kinda push down into the snow with your skis and just think about going to a side while doing it
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