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Krypton fit challenge

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Let me recap where I stand today and what I plan to do next. I am seeking some validation of the approach.

- Bought pair of Krypton Pros with Gold ID liner 2 weeks ago in CA.
- Along with them I bought a pair of Superfeet Kork custom footbed

I skied the setup this Sat for the first time and after 40 minutes I was in agony... In the evening I tried to understand what was happening. It turns out that the Kork footbed is quite high compared to the stock footbed and I thought that this is what was creating the issue.

I compared the Superfeet Kork to my other conformable custom footbed and realized that the conformable was much thinner.

So on Sunday I skied with the conformable and even though not ideal it was so much better than it gave me hope.

I then realized that all the testing of the boot in the shop was WITHOUT the kork footbed. Then he made the footbed and then molded the liner with the Kork footbed and I stood there for some time and took off.

I now plan to have the ID liner re-heated with my conformable footbed and a toe cap (which he did not use either).

I think the kork footbed will never work in this boot for me.

Does the above make sense?

Thanks
post #2 of 13
will the kork footbed work in that boot for you....well it really depends on your foot volume verses that of the boot , if the shell is really tight to your foot then probably not if there is a bit of space then there is a good chance of having it work

where did you get them done, we have a couple of boot pros on the forum based in france one of them may be able to help
post #3 of 13
Lionel_Bonnot...

Your bootfitter needs to remold you with the toe cap in place. There are two types of toe caps. One is made of rubber and is thick in front of the toes and the other is made of neoprene and quite a bit thinner. When I mold an "Intuition" type liner, I place the footbed/orthotic on the customers foot first, then the toe cap, then the sock over the everything else. If you're finding the boot is too tight, I would have your bootfitter mold them with the thicker rubber toe cap. Please reply with the sequence of the molding procedure that your bootfitter practiced before we go any further.
post #4 of 13
can i add to that in saying i would use an oven for the moulding process rather than the heat pipes.....in the past i have never found them get hot enough to mould the liner as effectively as i would like it
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CEM View Post
will the kork footbed work in that boot for you....well it really depends on your foot volume verses that of the boot , if the shell is really tight to your foot then probably not if there is a bit of space then there is a good chance of having it work

where did you get them done, we have a couple of boot pros on the forum based in france one of them may be able to help
The shell was tight in the first place. I think that the Kork is adding something like 2 or 3 mm under the front of my feet.

I got it done in San Jose, CA (The Helm of Sun Valley). But I ski in France and go to CA on a regular basis. My local guy that I know well in the Alps is willing to do whatever is necessary... I just have to tell him what this is. I was told about a guy in Chamonix but this is quite far for me.
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantman View Post
Lionel_Bonnot...

Your bootfitter needs to remold you with the toe cap in place. There are two types of toe caps. One is made of rubber and is thick in front of the toes and the other is made of neoprene and quite a bit thinner. When I mold an "Intuition" type liner, I place the footbed/orthotic on the customers foot first, then the toe cap, then the sock over the everything else. If you're finding the boot is too tight, I would have your bootfitter mold them with the thicker rubber toe cap. Please reply with the sequence of the molding procedure that your bootfitter practiced before we go any further.
The sequence used was:

- Make kork footbed
- heat ID gold liner with liner in the boot
- Put the kork footbed in the liner
- buckle up and wait 10/15 mins wearing a thin sock

- Lionel
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CEM View Post
can i add to that in saying i would use an oven for the moulding process rather than the heat pipes.....in the past i have never found them get hot enough to mould the liner as effectively as i would like it
CEM, it would be great if I could use an oven instead of the Dalbello Cell pipe that is very hard (almost impossible) to find in the Southern french Alps. I was advised against doing that in the Gear review forum and read somewhere else that oven should not be used.

What temperature and how much time for the cooking? Have you done that with Dalbello Gold ID liner?

Thanks
post #8 of 13
The heat pipes/riser system from Sun Valley Ski Tools gets plenty hot for molding these liners. I have done this countless times and no problem ever. If you wanted to use a oven, I would get a convection oven and heat on bake to just about 200 degrees fahrenheit. Do not place the liner too close to the oven's heating element or convection outlet port. Your problem will be deciding when these liners are "done" It's very much of a "feel" thing/experience.
post #9 of 13
i would have them done by a fitter, it may be a bit of a trek but to get your boots right it is well worth it.... you could have the footbed thinned down a little under the forefoot if tha tis where the problem is

the guys in chamonix are

smallzookeeper [steve] based in Footworks
Julsie [Jules] based in Sanglard sports

both post on here though Steve is around far more frequently
post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CEM View Post
i would have them done by a fitter, it may be a bit of a trek but to get your boots right it is well worth it.... you could have the footbed thinned down a little under the forefoot if tha tis where the problem is

the guys in chamonix are

smallzookeeper [steve] based in Footworks
Julsie [Jules] based in Sanglard sports

both post on here though Steve is around far more frequently
THanks. Tried to page Steve by PM but no luck so far...
post #11 of 13
Hello Lionel,

The information on molding the ID liner is all valid and correct. However a good boot fitter would first assess your foot and the 2 footbeds to help you determine which set-up would make the most sense.

The key to the footbed choice lies with 2 quick assesments of your foot & 3 quick assements of the footbeds.

The Foot:
1. Determine the flexibility of your arch with a windlass test.
2. Determine alignment of your forefoot to the rearfoot and assess if the 1st or 5th met heads are mobile.

The Footbed:
1. Is the heel cup deep enough to control the rear foot?
2. Does the shape match the bottom of your foot?
3. Are the heel bone, 1st & 5th met heads making a solid tri-pod on the bootboard?

Loaded with these answers from the assesment, a good bootfitter could help you decide which ( if any ) of the footbeds you have might work best with your foot. Or possibly make minor corrections to either your Conformable or Superfeet footbeds. And then decide the best molding course of action.

Do not throw the baby out with the bath water. Find a really good bootfitter.
post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by starthaus View Post
Hello Lionel,

The information on molding the ID liner is all valid and correct. However a good boot fitter would first assess your foot and the 2 footbeds to help you determine which set-up would make the most sense.

The key to the footbed choice lies with 2 quick assesments of your foot & 3 quick assements of the footbeds.

The Foot:
1. Determine the flexibility of your arch with a windlass test.
2. Determine alignment of your forefoot to the rearfoot and assess if the 1st or 5th met heads are mobile.

The Footbed:
1. Is the heel cup deep enough to control the rear foot?
2. Does the shape match the bottom of your foot?
3. Are the heel bone, 1st & 5th met heads making a solid tri-pod on the bootboard?

Loaded with these answers from the assesment, a good bootfitter could help you decide which ( if any ) of the footbeds you have might work best with your foot. Or possibly make minor corrections to either your Conformable or Superfeet footbeds. And then decide the best molding course of action.

Do not throw the baby out with the bath water. Find a really good bootfitter.
HI, thanks for the feedback. I had been using the conformable footbed for a couple of years in my XWaves with no problem. So I assume that this is fine. Even though the superfeet one is most likely fine as well as I have tried to use it with my old XWaves and it worked fine as well there as there is much more room in the XWave compared to the Krypton. And these 2 mm differences in height between conformable and Superfeet is I think what is getting me now.

I can't seem to find a consistent answer though on the re-heating process and whether or not an oven can be used...

Thanks
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Some update. This weekend I re-heated the ID liner (in an oven even though I was advised against it by some, 120C for 20 minutes) I then used a toe cap as well as my conformable custom foot bed.

Problem resolved! Skied 2 days with no more pain... Amazing what a few millimiters can do,

Thanks for all the help...
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