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Scott Macartney crash...

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
post #2 of 21
It's incredible to me that he is alert and discussing his run and fall! As a coach I always hold my breath a little when we get word that a racer has crashed and having one airlifted away is one of my worst fears.
post #3 of 21
That did not look like that bad of a fall.

Not that it looked like fun, but considering the potential for pain for WC speed even racers, that wasn't bad.

Hit his head seriously hard, but he landed on a downhill, didn't twist or cartwheel, and slid to a stop down a nice smooth, gradual runout.

Granted, that is one serious concussion. The twitching was creepy as well. I'm glad he was all right.
post #4 of 21
Hard to tell from the video, but there may have been contact with a ski after he was down and without a helmet.
post #5 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by MAGGOT View Post
That did not look like that bad of a fall.

Not that it looked like fun, but considering the potential for pain for WC speed even racers, that wasn't bad.

Hit his head seriously hard, but he landed on a downhill, didn't twist or cartwheel, and slid to a stop down a nice smooth, gradual runout.

Granted, that is one serious concussion. The twitching was creepy as well. I'm glad he was all right.
Considering he lost his helmet it could have been deadly. I think we are so numbed by spectacular crashes, both in skiing and other sports we almost have sub conscience expectations of invincibility. I've seen people hit trees at slower speeds and die. It's one of the reasons that until 3 years ago I was deathly afraid of skiing in the trees (thankfully I've gotten over that for the most part).
post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by MAGGOT View Post
That did not look like that bad of a fall.

Not that it looked like fun, but considering the potential for pain for WC speed even racers, that wasn't bad.

Hit his head seriously hard, but he landed on a downhill, didn't twist or cartwheel, and slid to a stop down a nice smooth, gradual runout.

Granted, that is one serious concussion. The twitching was creepy as well. I'm glad he was all right.
Not too bad?: Are you nutz or what?

You call it twitching I call it cunvulsing:

When was the last time you put a 10 Foot ladder on top of your SUV and jumped off on to an icy freeway hill on your back going 88MPH???:

Maybe his $320.00 POC helmet made the difference between life, life as a vegetable or DONE!!!!

POC: Skull Comp Helmet - In the world of sport helmets, there are essentially two types: Heavy hard shell helmets that resist penetration, and "in-mold" designs that protect your brain from moving inside your skull after a major impact. POC's new Skull Comp Helmet introduces the third type--a semi hard helmet that gives you both hard shell and "in-mold" characteristics for better durability and brain protection. Hard shell helmets are excellent at stopping penetration and distributing energy, but these traditional helmets are heavy and tend to bounce in a collision. The issue (it's really more of a calculated risk) is that if you hit something immobile with a hard shell helmet, your brain inside your skull might keep on moving in the direction of travel after your head and hard shell stopped, which can result in brain damage. The "in-mold" helmet designs came out of the cycling industry and feature a thinner shell with EPS inside that helps your brain decelerate during a big impact by collapsing with crumple zones that are not unlike a car. The disadvantage with the "in-mold" design is that it's a one-impact construction. If you take a big hit during a fall, the EPS crumples and absorbs the impact, but if you're still rolling around and looking at a multiple-impact scenario, those crumple zones are shot and your head is on the proverbial platter. That's why POC's semi-hard shell is popular among extreme skiers, winter athletes and alpine professionals. The Skull Comp Helmet has a full shell on the outside with a sandwich construction of shock-absorbing EPS and key areas (along the crown) made with polyurethane honeycomb that progressively absorb impact. The polyurethane honeycomb is exclusive to the Skull Comp Helmet, which explains why this advanced headwear is the prime pick for many downhill skiers. While the patent on the innovation is still pending, POC also added a lightweight unlaminated Aramid membrane between the shell and the EPS that prevents penetration through the shell without compromising the cushion on the inside. To save weight on all this innovation, the top shell on the Skull Comp is lighter and slightly thinner (0.9 mm) while the front and sides have a thicker (1.5 mm.) exterior. Keep in mind that POC backed the thinner top wall with all that polyurethane honeycomb inside, so the protective material still exceeds a lot of traditional hardshell helmets out there. Because the Skull Comp is a racing design, it doesn't have the same venting options you'll find on helmets that are designed to wear all day. If you're looking for similar features with a venting option, check out POC's Skull X helmet.
  • Innovative semi-hard shell concepts combines full hard shell protection with an impact absorbing EPS liner
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  • Patent-pending unlaminated Aramid membrane between the shell and EPS liner prevents penetration
  • Internal EPS core liner creates progressive energy absorption, significantly reducing the chance of brain damage during a hard impact with an unyielding object
  • Side ear openings are also reinforced for added protection
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  • Compatible with the POC Jaw and Chin Guard attachments
  • Weight: Under 475 g. depending on selected size
post #7 of 21
brutale and painful to watch.....
Infuriating is some of the comments posted on YouTube, they just don't get it........

I am sporting a POC......
post #8 of 21
I must say it looked really bad when his head hit the icy ground. I noticed that he is unconscious as he glided over the finish line. His shaking body looked really bad. I thought he is seriously injured, may be dying.

Well, I'm glad I was wrong. I read already yesterday that he is conscious again and does not even have broken bones. He only suffered concussion, although a serious one.

Scott's accident reminded me the dangers of downhill skiing. These guys are athletes, so their body can stand more than mine for example. As I do not ski so seriously anymore, I would have probably died in that crash.

My God, what a crash.. Still thinking about it.
post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by marko.pyhajarvi View Post
Well, I'm glad I was wrong. I read already yesterday that he is conscious again and does not even have broken bones. He only suffered concussion, although a serious one.

Yea, this is what I meant by not THAT bad.

His concussion will be all better in a week (probably) and he'll be back skiing soon.

Yea, it is a BAD hit to the head, but even that could have been much worse. Think about what could have happened if he landed on his head first, with his body a bit cockeyed. This about if this had been on another part of the course, one without a perfect runout. Think about if he had cartwheeled after he lost the helmet.

Regardless, I'm glad he's doing well. (relatively)
post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by MAGGOT View Post
Yea, this is what I meant by not THAT bad.

His concussion will be all better in a week (probably) and he'll be back skiing soon.

Yea, it is a BAD hit to the head, but even that could have been much worse. Think about what could have happened if he landed on his head first, with his body a bit cockeyed. This about if this had been on another part of the course, one without a perfect runout. Think about if he had cartwheeled after he lost the helmet.

Regardless, I'm glad he's doing well. (relatively)
I agree, Scott was very lucky.
post #11 of 21
um, any time you bounce, it's not a good fall. What kept him from having broken bones is that he landed almost perfectly flat, dispersing the force across his frame.
post #12 of 21
to see his helmet slide into him a few seconds later was numbing.
post #13 of 21
Hi guys, my first post on here.

I was at the race on Saturday, in the finish area just 30 yards from where Scott stopped his slide.

Viewing the event live is totally different to watching on TV. On TV you do not get a feel for the seriousness of the situation. Never before have I felt such a dramatic change in atmosphere. One minute 50,000+ fans were electric, the next is was stunned silence.

The TV pictures cut away after about 5 seconds of convulsions. Shortly after that, Scott stopped moving entirely, you could not tell he was breathing, he was still as a stone. My wife and I thought the worst, and judging by the silence a many others must have too.

It seemed to take an age for anyone to arrive on the scene, maybe a minute or so but under the circumstances we felt helpless and wanted to jump over the barriers to help, not that we could have done anything. Even when people did arrive to help, they appeared to be sauntering, not running and with no sense of urgency - it was all very surreal. When the helicopter lifted him up, we did not know if he was dead or alive.

During the rest of the race there was no news about his condition, it wasn't until much later in the afternoon that we learnt he was alive and wow what a relief that was.

Thank god, he is a very lucky boy ! Get well soon Scott !!!

As for the rest of the race, Bode's slide across the vinyl vertical was gobsmackingly awesome, without that there's no doubt he would have walked the victory. But a great run by Cuche to take it.

All in, a super race, but marred this horrible incident.
post #14 of 21
Anytime a racer loses a helmet chances are the head was badly shaken.

Recurring injuries of this type produce substantial long term effects.

I hate to see these falls

Michael
post #15 of 21
Smithski, thank you for posting your in person account. I've yet to find any video of help arriving (last I can see it appears like two people are heading toward him and you're right it looks slow).
post #16 of 21
Just remember anytime you are going onto the course, you need to use extreme caution there may be another racer on course and headed for you!

They may have been in communication with the starter or mid-point by radio to make sure that there was a hold on.

Imagine the disaster if someone came over that jump at 70 mph into a group of responders.

What appears to have been a slow response may have been "by the book".
post #17 of 21
Good point Yuki. Although, I think that in World Cup they don't start another racer until course is clear but not positive.

One of our biggest problems on courses we set for training and races is people cutting through trees that don't realize there is a course on the other side. During races we have enough gatekeepers on course to keep them out but training is definitely a little nerve wracking.
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Just remember anytime you are going onto the course, you need to use extreme caution there may be another racer on course and headed for you!

They may have been in communication with the starter or mid-point by radio to make sure that there was a hold on.
At that point in the race, they were starting at 2-minute intervals (done for TV broadcasting purposes), so there wasn't another racer yet on course. Benni Raich was in the gate, about 20 seconds from his start, when the course hold was placed.

But I'm sure that the two "first responders" were tuned into the race officials' radio, just to be sure that they wouldn't get clocked (and likely killed) by an oncoming racer.
post #19 of 21
Did anyone else see the Bormio downhill? They run it under one of the chairs. I wonder if there's netting or if there's nothing to prevent someone from dropping a glove or a pole onto the course.
post #20 of 21
I'm sure there are certain protocols and procedures which must be adhered to in these situations, but what annoyed us was that when people did go to assist, they did so in a leisurely fashion, i.e. some people on skis sliding down to the scene VERY slowly, and others on foot walking up to the scene, not running, all happening with no apparent sense of urgency at all.

The response team will have known they were at least 2 minutes away from 'being clocked' by the next racer and given the gravity of the situation we felt the response was slow.

Had the next racer started, there was no way the organisers would have allowed him to finish, so in this case common sense would suggest "just get on there and help the guy out".
post #21 of 21
The problem of racer-worker collision is a real one: it killed Regine Cavagnoud a few years ago. Recently, Julia Mancuso came within a few feet of hitting an errant course worker in training.

The 2-minute interval, as mentioned, is for TV purposes. Anyone around a speed course should have all his natural reflexes tuned to the assumption that there's 40 or fewer seconds between racers. Of course, at Kitzbuhel I'm sure there are plenty of flaggers to stop the following racer, but still ....
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