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Breakthrough today!

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I had such an AHA! moment today while skiing. I've been skiing for 5 winters, probably 20 ski days total.

I've gotten pretty good and am comfortable on single blacks, with an occasional double black.

I'm not trained or skilled in moguls.

I've never really used my poles that much. Skiing on mostly groomed terrain I just use a flowing pole plant. I've never used it for stability really.

So today I was on a double black with a lot of crud, natural moguls. I was bouncing around and about to lose my balance when the AHA moment happened!

That was when my inside ski pole just happened to be be dragging on the surface, just as I was about to lose balance. The pole drag kept me UP. I felt totally supported and I stabilized.

I was THRILLED and now I'm much more confident to start mogul skiing. Finally, after 5 years I found out what the poles were for! ahahaah

I guess to sum up, my EUREKA moment was: So THAT'S what these damn poles have been for. I always wondered why I needed them.

ahahahhah

SKI CONDITIONS WERE EXCELLENT TODAY in UPSTATE NEW YORK!
post #2 of 14

Take cover

NYCJim--

Eventually, a ski instructor hearabouts may weigh in that there are actually some other applications for your poles, even more useful in the long run. (Don't ask me. I use 'em in the start of the race course, but I'm still saving up to buy a pole plant/touch that might come into play further down.)

In the meantime, in the not raining on your parade department (1) congratulations--every aha moment deserves many more to follow, and I've certainly had my share of aha moments that were not actually in the center channel of the ski technique river (understatement alert); (2) Joel Chenal, a pretty good French ski racer, uses his inside pole in a very similar way, during World Cup GS ski races--the inside hand drags the pole as a cat's whisker on the snow, as a feel/ balance/confidence aid. Presumably, the improved balance and confidence (and opportunity to use it the way you did, to avoid falling in) pays off enough to justify the additional drag.
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 

thanks!

Thanks for the info!
post #4 of 14
Congratulations, you have found out one use for poles. A reference point of contact for balance.

Here's a little demo about you can try. This can be done almost anywhere. Stand on one foot with your eyes closed. Notice how you might waver a bit. Some people can't do this at all. (Be careful, don't fall.) Now place one finger very lightly on the wall or a piece of furniture. (Just very light contact, no pressure on the finger.) Now close your eyes and stand on one foot. It should be a whole bunch easier. Its that extra point of contact that helps. It gives you a reference point around which to base your position. This helps with balance.

In uneven terrain, a pole plant or touch will do the same thing for you. It gives you a point of reference. Notice how the high end mogul competitors use a hard pole plant on each bump. It gives them a point of reference and can serve as a leverage point if needed.
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 

cool!

Thanks, I just did as you said and it's amazing. Something so seemingly insignificant can mean all the world.

Now I am going to have much, much more confidence in uneven terrain. I'm going to look at it as little moguls and in addition to balance and foot action I now know to use the poles!

I'm very much looking forward to the next time out skiing. I may go right to a mogul run!
post #6 of 14
I lean on mine in lift lines.

Yes, thats about all I use poles for. Not a good thing.
post #7 of 14
in flat light conditons I actually allways drag my poles so I dont get sick or dizzy,
post #8 of 14
Yeah, in flat light I lean on mine when nauseau sets in. Seriously, I like pole plants, especially in bumps, but then I'm old school compared to a lot of you.
post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 

Interesting

My bad, I missed the humor and thought you really got dizzy.
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCJIM View Post
My bad, I missed the humor and thought you really got dizzy.
no humor in a treeless bowl with no visiablity sometimes your not sure which way is down and if your going forwards or backwards or sideways. poles can act like feelers then.
post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the info!
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCJIM View Post

So today I was on a double black with a lot of crud, natural moguls. I was bouncing around and about to lose my balance when the AHA moment happened!

That was when my inside ski pole just happened to be be dragging on the surface, just as I was about to lose balance. The pole drag kept me UP. I felt totally supported and I stabilized.

I was THRILLED and now I'm much more confident to start mogul skiing. Finally, after 5 years I found out what the poles were for! ahahaah
Pole drag .... one of the finer NY technical points of bump skiing.
post #13 of 14
I like my feelers. So much so, I have had the same Scott grips transfer to poles as they have been replaced over the last 5 or 6 years.

Scott grips + hockey-tape around the strap + deerskin gloves = mmmmmmmm...

[on a side note- my Falcon 10 is the first boot of my life that made my feet tickle when walking in new snow. fricking sensitive in a wierd way. I don't quite know if I like it yet.]
post #14 of 14
Me, I've used the same pole baskets for the last 6 years, on three different sets of poles. Lost one (disaster!) catskiing last year. Last run of the trip, so couldn't even look for it. Got home, spent a week looking for one to match, couldn't find one, then spent an hour cutting another one down to match the one I'd lost. Very particular about pole baskets. Not too big, not too small...
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