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Beginners tip bible - share yours - Page 11

post #301 of 330

Cotton v synthetic  I have skied with cotton next to my skin for 40 years with no problems. Synthetics may be better but cotton works fine for me and seems kinder to my skin. Mind you I also ski in rear entry boots. 

 

Passing someone on a flattish traverse,. I do this a fair bit as I am heavy and ski on long skis which I keep waxed. I call out " passing on your left [or right] ". If they are wearing a helmet or ear buds I make it a fair bit louder. People who look like they are beginners or shaky get a bit more clearance. If it is on a narrow traverse I will pass on the outside if possible. If you are a beginner expect to get passed on traverses and don't panic if you hear someone coming, just don't do anything sudden or unpredictable. If you decide to do a panic stop indicate with an outstretched  arm the direction you are turning. 

post #302 of 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by TQA View Post
 

Cotton v synthetic  I have skied with cotton next to my skin for 40 years with no problems. Synthetics may be better but cotton works fine for me and seems kinder to my skin. Mind you I also ski in rear entry boots. 

The issue with cotton vs synthetic clothing is what happens when the material gets damp.  Cotton doesn't dry fast, so the person wearing cotton can end up really cold.  A beginner who is getting into skiing is better off getting base layers that are quick drying.  These days, not that hard to find at second-hand shops if don't want to spend a lot of money.  Doesn't need to be billed as "ski wear."  Any athletic wear will do, assuming wearing warm and relatively waterproof and breathable outerwear (jacket, ski pants).

 

Definitely not a good idea to wear cotton socks.

post #303 of 330
Quote:
 Cotton is comfortable and i often wear it as a base layer...I just like the way it feels next to my skin.

We're trying for the best advice for the greatest number of readers.  Cotton ski wear is not good advice.

post #304 of 330
Indeed regard cotton (or other non-synthetic) vs synthetic, and it goes for not only base layer, but insulation as well.

Once I was skiing trees and missed the boundary mark, and went into a valley. I had to climb up in knee deep powder for a hour to get back to the ski hill. By the time I got back to the lodge I was squeezing water out of my primaloft insulated mid layer. I had no idea it was even wet until then because it kept me warm in -20 temperature, but if I had my down filled vest on, it would've been less than useless. After I squeezed out all the water I went back out and kept skiing, it again kept me warm just fine.

Synthetic fibers retain something like 90% insulation value when wet, down/cotton retains 0%.
post #305 of 330

someone told me this one but I got lazy and forgot. I got a painful reminder last time I was out. 

 

Don't bring your wallet with you. Bring your credit card, driver license, maybe a little a few 20 dollar bills and that's it. I landed hard on an icy mogul run and landed on my wallet - right in the middle of my thigh. It's been a week and I'm still in pain, my leg is many shades of purple, and I'm still awaiting the results of my ultrasound to see how severe my muscle tears are. The ultrasound technician had a good laugh as I described my fall. As I was talking about my wallet she found a huge square shaped spot of damage on my thigh. I asked her if she'd found my wallet and she just nodded. 

post #306 of 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhkc View Post
 

someone told me this one but I got lazy and forgot. I got a painful reminder last time I was out. 

 

Don't bring your wallet with you. Bring your credit card, driver license, maybe a little a few 20 dollar bills and that's it. I landed hard on an icy mogul run and landed on my wallet - right in the middle of my thigh. It's been a week and I'm still in pain, my leg is many shades of purple, and I'm still awaiting the results of my ultrasound to see how severe my muscle tears are. The ultrasound technician had a good laugh as I described my fall. As I was talking about my wallet she found a huge square shaped spot of damage on my thigh. I asked her if she'd found my wallet and she just nodded. 


Or use a mini-wallet from TGT or Crabby.  :)

 

Also useful to carry your medical insurance card.  I've never needed it while skiing, but worth having handy just in case.

post #307 of 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhkc View Post
 

someone told me this one but I got lazy and forgot. I got a painful reminder last time I was out. 

 

Don't bring your wallet with you. Bring your credit card, driver license, maybe a little a few 20 dollar bills and that's it. I landed hard on an icy mogul run and landed on my wallet - right in the middle of my thigh. It's been a week and I'm still in pain, my leg is many shades of purple, and I'm still awaiting the results of my ultrasound to see how severe my muscle tears are. The ultrasound technician had a good laugh as I described my fall. As I was talking about my wallet she found a huge square shaped spot of damage on my thigh. I asked her if she'd found my wallet and she just nodded. 

 

I'd add your insurance card as well.  Seriously, CC, ID, Insurance and some cash.

 

Nevermind- didn't see above post.

post #308 of 330

I haven't made it through the whole thread yet and don't know if this has been mentioned:

 

- No matter how sideways to the hill you think you are, no matter how edge locked you think your skis are, If you are in your skis and remotely on a a steep of any kind, even if you think it is practically flat , DO NOT stand completely vertical and straighten your legs while in your skis. It will send you flying down the hill before you even know what to do or how to correct and control yourself. 

post #309 of 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by scott112 View Post
 

I haven't made it through the whole thread yet and don't know if this has been mentioned:

 

- No matter how sideways to the hill you think you are, no matter how edge locked you think your skis are, If you are in your skis and remotely on a a steep of any kind, even if you think it is practically flat , DO NOT stand completely vertical and straighten your legs while in your skis. It will send you flying down the hill before you even know what to do or how to correct and control yourself. 

 

Let me take a moment to clarify this point. It isn't so much that straightening your legs will cause you to go down the hill, as it is that when straightening your legs, many people have a tendency to flatten their skis. Your ability to remain stationary on a slope has everything to do with your skis being across the fall line, as well as the skis tipped onto their edges enough to resist the pull of gravity down the hill. If an skier can straighten their legs and keep the ski on edge, they will not slide. 

 

However, it is absolutely always a good idea to stay in a well balanced, athletic stance whenever your skis are on your feet. That means knees slightly bent, back straight. In my many years instructing, I've always emphasized this athletic stance as the best starting point, even if you're standing still. Heck, if you take a good look at your ski boots, you'll realize they're designed to lean you forward, which naturally causes you to bend your knees. Standing straight up in ski boots is uncomfortable. This is a case where a little 'slouch' is okay... as long as its only in your legs!

post #310 of 330
Thread Starter 

Lito Tejada-Flores Breakthough on Skis How to get out of the Intermediate Rut is mentioned a lot in this thread.....this was just posted in the tired legs blue terrain thread.

 

It's free as are the other 2 videos.....but you really should own a new copy :)

 

Refer to the other thread for some recent Lito talk.....

 

Solid gold here, just the best ski instruction ever......old school love the mid 90's Descente outfits!

 

web site appears inactive for past year, not clear what Lito is up to these days perhaps someone in the know can chime in....

 

http://www.breakthroughonskis.com/

 

Lito's DVD's are also avail on eBay.

 

Disclaimer I have never met Lito and have no dog in this fight (though skiing with Lito has been a dream of mine for 20 years)

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7U2Xm0niMJo&t=856s

post #311 of 330

Some very good advice given to a novice who asked for suggestions for buying boots and skis to use during the second season.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by checksix68 View Post
 

Welcome to Epic.  I'll start off by agreeing with @sibhusky.  Boots are by far, IMHO the most important piece of equipment you will buy.  It doesn't necessarily mean that you will have to spend a ton of money to find the right boot, but having a custom fit pair of boots is a giant step in the right direction.  I'll embed a video from a boot fitter in my part of the country that helps explain why it's so important.

 

 

As far as the rest of your equipment is concerned, a ski swap may be a good place to start looking for inexpensive used equipment.  Based on the information you provided, and based on ski sizing charts, you should be looking for a ski in the 154-160 cm length.  The "All Mountain" category would probably be a good first choice.  As your skill level progresses, a longer ski may be desired as they tend to offer more stability at higher speeds.  I wouldn't get too hung up on a particular brand.  All ski manufacturers tend to have the same "Gee Whiz" technology built into them referred to by different technological names.  I will say this... ski's will not make you a better skier.  Spending time developing your skill set, through practice and doing drills is what will ultimately develop you into a better, more advanced skier.  I'm far from being an expert skier, btw.

 

Other equipment considerations.  Ski apparel:  cotton is the enemy.  Cotton traps moisture leaving you feeling wet and eventually cold.  Look for man made materials that wick moisture away from your skin.

I tend to use a layering system so I can add or remove layers based on the ambient temperature.  Also, keep in mind ski apparel tends to run a bit small.  So, if you're ever in doubt when using a sizing chart, it may not be a bad idea to go one size up.  

 

Socks:  Buy ones that are specifically made for skiing.  There are several brands and some use material like "Smartwool."  There are 3 different weights.  Thin, mid and heavy.  This just refers to their thickness and one may be more comfortable than the other depending on the temperature.  Although ski socks can be expensive ranging from about $15 to $35 per pair, they are well worth the investment.  As with all things I will mention, there are sales going on at different times of the year, and by shopping online, you could save as much as 50-70 percent off.  I think REI is having a big Labor Day sale to name one retailer, but there are many others.

 

A base layer is a garment worn next to the skin.  This too should be man made material that provides a degree of warmth and wicks moisture away from your skin.  My favorite base layer is made by Patagonia, and contains a technology called Polygenie.  Sweat does not stink.  It's the bacteria that grows in it that causes odor.  Polygenie kills the odor causing bacteria so you don't have to launder your garments as often.

 

Mid layer:  This is a jacket or type of sweatshirt worn under your outer jacket that provides warmth and also wicks moisture away from skin.  Patagonia Nano Puff or Northface Thermoball are a couple examples, although there are several different options you could go with as a mid layer.  The two I mentioned are incredibly light weight and warm.

 

Jacket and ski pants:  There are two types.  Shell and insulated.  A shell is just what it says, essentially a thin jacket.  Insulated jackets are typically thicker and warmer, but not so great when spring skiing rolls around and temperatures are warmer.  Three important qualities to look for when selecting your jacket or ski pants/bibs.  Waterproffness, Windproffness and Breathabily.  Each have their own rating.  A higher number means it has more of the quality.  30k is better than 10k.  Some ski jackets and pants are now designed to offer extra roominess in areas where skiers flex and extend while skiing, making them more comfortable.  As a matter of fact, I just received my new jacket today.  I bought an Atomic Ridgeline 3L jacket, (last year's model).  This is normally a $400 jacket at full retail price.  I picked it up online at Sturtevants Sports for $175.

 

Helmets:  IMO you get what you pay for, but as long as you wear one, that's the important thing.  I happen to have one that is audio compatible.  I bought some "chips" from Outdoor Technology that zip into the ear flaps on my helmet so I can listen to my tunes while skiing and make and receive phone calls all at the touch of a button without having to stop skiing.  Although I always stop when using the phone.  Otherwise it'd be like talking on the phone while driving.  Not a good idea.

 

Goggles:  many different brands.  I use a pair that enables me to swap out lenses for different lighting conditions.  Yellow or clear for night, blue tint for flat light, a dark lens for really sunny days.

 

Gloves or Mits:  Personal preference

 

Poles:  They should fit comfortably in your hand and touch the ground when your arm is bent at the elbow at a 90 degree angle.  There are different materials uses to make poles, some are lighter than others.  There are also different size baskets on the bottom of the pole.  Larger baskets may be more appropriate if you're going to ski in a lot of powder.  Anyone who's ever "eaten it" in pow knows that the size basket you have on the end of your pole could be the difference between easily getting back up or flailing around in the snow while trying to get back up.  I have small baskets on my poles, so when I fell, I stuck my pole into the snow to assist me in getting back to my feet, but the snow was deep enough that the pole just went deeper into the snow and was useless in assisting me.

 

I think that about covers it.  If I missed something, or if there are dissenting opinions, I'm sure someone else will chime in.  Best of luck to you in your endeavors.   

 

Usage tip: The green arrow in the Quote above is a "forward" link.  Hover over it until you get the pointing hand pointer, then click to go to the original post/thread.

post #312 of 330

Not exactly for beginners, but more for those who have just bought their first pair of skis, regardless of how well they ski.

 

Skis need to be "tuned" and "waxed" on a regular basis.  That involves taking care of metal edges and bases.  For bases, "waxing" is needed.  How often depends on the type of snow.  For me, on man-made snow in the southeast I try to wax after every 3-4 ski days (5-6 hours each day).  Might be more often for people in the northeast, probably less for people who ski in the Rockies or out west in general.  Personally, I leave tuning edges to professionals, usually once a year.

 

Here's a video to give an idea of the process for a basic wax.  Even if you pay a ski shop to wax, helps to understand the process.  Not that a "belt wax" at a ski shop is different from a "hand wax" as shown in the video.

 

 

If you have questions, best to ask in the Tuning, Maintenance and Repair sub-forum.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/147774/how-to-wax-skis-basic-waxing

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/147686/how-to-wax-deburr-skis-4-part-video-series

post #313 of 330

Thanks Ghost. I just purchased my first pair of ski's and would not have thought to wipe down the edges.

post #314 of 330

i think its all really just a joke, somthing for people to laugh at but at the same time, tips down and entire binding over the sholder gives you more control on where you are carrying the ski, its more comfortable. apart from that it doesnt really matter

post #315 of 330
Quote:
  Not that a "belt wax" at a ski shop is different from a "hand wax"

Ah...a belt wax from a shop lasts me about 3-4 hours.  A good ironed-in hot wax lasts 3-4 days.  Note that we want the wax in the pores of the base plastic, not on the base.

 

The waxing video does much more than I ever do.  Nothing wrong with it, just many more steps for little extra gain.  I hold a bar of universal wax (I like Hertel Super Hot Sauce) against the sole of the iron and dribble it on to the ski base.  Iron it in until it is totally melted--never stop moving the iron, use as little heat as possible to melt the wax.  With a folded paper towel in one hand and the iron in the other, re-melt the wax and wipe off the excess with the paper towel.  Go skiing.  Yep, they're slow for the first few feet, then they slide just as good as scraped & brushed bottoms.  For 3-4 days.

 

If the iron hangs up on the ski edges, if it seems to scrape the ski edges, that's a sign that the base of the ski is cupped.  It'll ski somewhere between 100% and 10,000% better after a stone grind by a good ski shop.  I like to have the shop grind the ski edges with a 1° bottom edge bevel and a 3° side edge bevel.  For a beginner, maybe a 1° edge bevel is prudent.

post #316 of 330

I agree with the Paper Towel, been doing that for a couple of years,

Iron the wax in low heat for maybe 8 passes then paper tower or napkin.

But I do Brush with a 2 dollar plastic brush from Walmart for a couple of minutes when they cool down.

 

With a folded paper towel in one hand and the iron in the other, re-melt the wax and wipe off the excess with the paper towel.  Go skiing. 

post #317 of 330

If you have a pair of gloves that are not keeping you as warm as you would like, you can alwarys use them in the spring when temperatures are warmer. Pay a little more for good gloves. Nothing can ruin a fun ski day faster than cold hands (and cold feet).

post #318 of 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
 

Obviously a lot of great tips for Beginners.  Let me approach this from a different direction. Forty years of skiing.

 

Advice has been given to take lessons whenever possible etc. but sometimes separate yourself from the mechanics of skiing and constant learning of new techniques.  Go out on your favorite run on your favorite mountain and just be alone with the snow.  Slowly and quietly (midweek recommended) breath in the air and feel where you are.   Look around and learn to appreciate the trees, snow and beauty that is skiing.  Start down the hill and instead of planning each turn try to flow with the contours of the mountain.  Don't turn if you don't want to or have to but feel the hill and the snow under your feet.  Absorb them into you conscious mind and let that feeling be reflected in how you are skiing at that very precise moment. When you start this endeavor your feeling of t he snow may only last a few seconds but with repetition and awareness the time period will keep increasing, hopfully culminating in feeling a new and longer experience.

 

Doing this will be maybe very hard for a new skier, hell  it is very hard for experienced skiers  Some never reach his level.  Your self realization of the above will go a long way in getting you along the path of someday being a  real skier not just a mechanical human.

 

Feeling the precision of a well carved turn to the floating quietness of a powder arc will then become part of your skiing future.

 

Well said Pete!

 

In addition to the excitement and adventure ot skiing, is the beauty...  which you can see and, as you said, you can feel.

post #319 of 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiVibes View Post
 

If you have a pair of gloves that are not keeping you as warm as you would like, you can always use them in the spring when temperatures are warmer. Pay a little more for good gloves. Nothing can ruin a fun ski day faster than cold hands (and cold feet).


Yes, and...the body wants to survive.  It needs a functioning brain and main organs.  It can lose hands & feet.

 

The brain will bring warm blood to keep #1 the brain and #2 the torso warm.  It'll cut off warm blood to the hands and feet if needed.

 

So...Keep your head warm.  Keep your torso warm.  Wear a balaclava or helmet liner under your helmet.  Do not wear a thick knit hat under your helmet--you need the helmet close to your skull for the best concussion prevention.  Wear modern high tech layers on your torso, or down (but not in the wet), whatever keeps you warm and lets you move.

 

I used to have perennially damp & cold hands.  I got to the point of carrying additional, dry gloves to wear after lunch.  The morning gloves always got snow covered, then thawed and got wet during lunch.  The other pair of gloves was the answer.  Thin poly or wool glove liners are a very good idea.  Chemical hand warmers placed in your gloves on the backs of your hands works well--I use them below +10°F.  On the backs of your hands they heat the blood going to your fingers.  Electric heated gloves are a great, but expensive, option.  Mittens are warmer than gloves of the same price.

 

One pair of thin or medium ski socks.  Get neoprene boot covers if you still have cold feet.  Or chemical toe warmers.  Or electric heated insoles.

post #320 of 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

For the first time skier, dealing with the chairlift can be a source of worry.  There are several different types of chair lifts, but the general principles for loading and unloading are the same.  When in doubt, watch for a few minutes before getting in line.  You can also let the lift operator know that you are nervous.  The lift can be slowed if necessary.  Ask at at the bottom how to use a hand signal to let the operator at the top know to slow down.  That's especially useful if you are with a child who is also not that experienced with loading or unloading a chair lift.

 

Here is a video with an introduction to loading and unloading a double chair lift.

 

 

Here is a video with ideas related to unloading safely.  Note that poles should be held in one hand and not used to stab at the snow as you unload.

 

If you are tall, watch your head!

 

My friends explained to me how to get on the lift before we got into line. And, as we worked our way to the front of the line, I watched the other skiers get on the lift. Our turn... did everything right... looking over my outside shoulder, looking at the chair as it swung around and then wham! The metal bar on the top of the chair hit me in the head. I was focusing on the seat of the chair, where I was getting ready to sit and the metal rail where I was going to grab with my hand, not looking up at the bar. This was an older lift so maybe the bar was lower than on newer lifts, I don't know.  Now that I am aware it can happen, especially on the older lifts, I bend at the waist a little more, keep my head tipped down a bit and I make a quick glance up at the bar. For reference I am 6 foot 3 / 190 cm (keep in mind that your boots and skis add at least a couple of inches to what you are used to}.

 

Another good reason to wear a helmet.

post #321 of 330
Still browsing the thread but finding most is downhill... any dedicated xc skiers around to chime in for me? Loved going out as a kid now in my late 30s & we are going to start going as a family
post #322 of 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by familyfun View Post

Still browsing the thread but finding most is downhill... any dedicated xc skiers around to chime in for me? Loved going out as a kid now in my late 30s & we are going to start going as a family


Welcome to EpicSki!  You will find that we are mostly talking about alpine skiing, whether on resort or off.  There is a section for other types of skiing, including cross-country.

 

http://www.epicski.com/f/13/backcountry-telemark-and-cross-country

post #323 of 330

Don't forget to wash the inner soles of your boots at least once a season on a low temperautre wash! Seems common sense but I meet so many people that tell me that they don't see the point to wash them as they only use their boots one week a year. Trust me, your boots do stink even if you don't think so!

post #324 of 330

How to get off a chair lift--

--Point your skis straight ahead.  Tips raised up a bit--push your legs forward to raise the tips.  Let them slide on the snow.

--At the Get Off Here sign stand all the way up.  Do not crouch.  If you crouch, you'll probably fall.  If you stand tall and balanced, you'll probably do great.

--Balance on the balls of your feet and slide to a flat spot or slide away from the crowd and stop as you've been taught.

--If you fall, roll, crawl, scoot out of the way.  Get out of the way of skiers coming up in the next chair.  Yes, the liftie is supposed to stop the chairlift.  Supposed to.

post #325 of 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post

Indeed regard cotton (or other non-synthetic) vs synthetic, and it goes for not only base layer, but insulation as well.

Once I was skiing trees and missed the boundary mark, and went into a valley. I had to climb up in knee deep powder for a hour to get back to the ski hill. By the time I got back to the lodge I was squeezing water out of my primaloft insulated mid layer. I had no idea it was even wet until then because it kept me warm in -20 temperature, but if I had my down filled vest on, it would've been less than useless. After I squeezed out all the water I went back out and kept skiing, it again kept me warm just fine.

Synthetic fibers retain something like 90% insulation value when wet, down/cotton retains 0%.


Be careful when you lump non-synthetic in with cotton. Merino wool, arguably nature's finest wide range temperature and moisture controlling fibre makes fantastic base (and all) layers and is certainly environmentally more sustainable than synthetics. In addition to providing the unique ability to warm when the person is cool/ cold and cool when the person is hot, it wicks moisture away from the skin, it is breathable and it has another desirable attribute is its ability to not take on odour ie not stinking like a fisherman's vest after one day of skiing (like most synthetics do). So if one is travelling and space/ weight is an issue one will get more useful wear out of merino than any other fabric. Icebreaker makes a wide range if you want a global brand. Ibex if you want a fully traceable North American brand. Happy trails.

post #326 of 330
Thread Starter 

I just took a few minutes to read thru the first few pages of this pet project of mine.

 

I'd like to see this thing crank up again as we have many new novices visiting our forum and I'd like to see them find value here.....

 

Again, the OP (me) sees zero value with chiming in "take a lesson" so along with the words "gaper" "jong" and "skitotes" I would like to enforce the rule of no more "take a lesson" posts in this thread. Post that one somewhere else.....

In fact I wish I could go edit out all the "take a lesson" posts here but I can't.

 

"take a lesson " is now forbidden!

 

I would also add strongly that a lot has happened in our sport since this thread started. A huge change is the amount of free training material on YouTube. So much of it is so so good it might actually minimize the "take a Lesson" for many visual athletic learners (tho I do actually recommend 1 lesson at least for every newbie) Youtube is your friend. Use it! Searching is fun!

 

Free is even better!

 

In a sincere effort to get this ball rolling again I will revisit my post no 102 from this thread below......

 

C'mon let's go with the tips!!!

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

 

 

In closing for tonight I would like to speak directly to newbie visitors to this thread.....kinda along the lines of Pete's comment above.....


-Learn early in your ski career to have an open mind.....this thread is a good example. There are many solid tips and tidbits here but please remember, all of it need not work for YOU!  My tips tend to be visual in nature, that is how I learn. Words and ski books talking about skiing, it doesn't work for me. Visual stuff may not work for you. So digest it all, try what looks good to you and throw everything that doesn't out. Our fabulous sport of recreational skiing is about fun!!  Arguments and posturing, we have enough of that in our daily life. Our great sport is truly one of life's greatest pleasures. Trust me, when you can do it at above the intermediate level it is truly like flying. You will be hard pressed to find any activity as exciting and rewarding as recreational alpine skiing.

-So work hard to get better. Read everything you can about skiing. Look at video, click on the links in this thread and ask for and hunt for more. Watch Greg Stump and Warren Miller, Lito Tejada Flores and TGR videos.....devour it all. Learn about ski gear, what different types of skis can do to supercharge your skiing. Demo, demo demo gear and then demo some more.

-Ski forums on the internet....there are many(I think Epic is the best) but others are good too, sign up ask questions and discuss our great sport. If you get flamed put "em on ignore and move on. When you feel like firing back at a sarcastic or mean spirited post....walk away from the keyboard. That will protect you. You can learn a lot about our sport from a place like this.....tread carefully but without fear. It is all for you.

-It is incredible to believe that people argue about skiing......tipping, steering, hopping, rotary blah blah blah ......but know this my beginner friends.....I have never had an argument about skiing on the hill. I taught for 10 years and have ski'd since I was a baby. Not one argument....never. I personally have always considered anyone on the hill with a smile on their face to be an expert regardless of how they ski. If you are smiling you are my friend.

Enjoy and welcome!

Now all the rest of us let's get to work and get those free ski tips coming!!!!

post #327 of 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by hrstrat57 View Post

 

"take a lesson " is now forbidden!........

 

........I do actually recommend 1 lesson at least for every newbie

 

:D

post #328 of 330
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 

 

:D

 

ha ha, I am the all powerful OP!

 

I can break my own rules.......:rules:

 

Anybody else breaks "em watch out!

 

:snowfight:duel:

 

 

 

:popcorn

post #329 of 330

Wow.  I read the whole thread.

 

I'm a complete beginner, but I have a tip:  Bring some snacks.  And drink water, even if you don't feel thirsty, or would rather just get on the lift line.  Getting dehydrated is easy.  Being dehydrated with beginner skills on an unfamiliar trail is horrible.  Trust me on that one.

post #330 of 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by newboots View Post
 

Wow.  I read the whole thread.

 

I'm a complete beginner, but I have a tip:  Bring some snacks.  And drink water, even if you don't feel thirsty, or would rather just get on the lift line.  Getting dehydrated is easy.  Being dehydrated with beginner skills on an unfamiliar trail is horrible.  Trust me on that one.


Good thought!

 

Even more important for a beginner who is a on a ski vacation at higher altitude than where they live.  For example, if someone lives in Washington DC or Boston or Raleigh, then flies to Denver to ski, very important to stay hydrated when sleeping at over 7000 feet.  Everyone adjusts to high altitude a little different, but drinking plenty of fluid (and not alcohol) the first few days is very important.

 

An EpicSki Article by a Colorado physician titled "Altitude Adaptation And Acute Mountain Sickness."

 

http://www.epicski.com/a/altitude-adaptation-and-acute-mountain-sickness

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