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Intense Leg Pain - Falcon 10

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
I've been experiencing pretty intense pain up my legs when I crank my Falcon 10s to the point where they feel tight enough. I took them in to the boot fitter and he told me they are too big and that I'm cranking them so tightly to keep my feet stable. They are not so big as to be sloppy - maybe just a half size above ideal. He put neoprene shims around the ankles as well as bending back the plastic at the top rear of the boot. I still can't get the boot as tight as I'd like without severe pain. An interesting note is that my FEET don't hurt at all - it's my legs, and when I loosen the buckles, the pain in my legs disappears. Is there anything else to be done? Would getting different liners make a difference?
post #2 of 27
KyndKyd...

What is the shape of and size of your calf? (big/small/high/low)
What is the shell fit like?
Respond before we go any further.
post #3 of 27
Thread Starter 
My calf is relatively small but also more low than high. I personally thought it was a calf shape/size issue and was surprised when he said it was a boot size issue. The shell fit (haphazardly measured just now) is probably a bit less than 3/4 inch (in the heel), which I think maybe is a BIT large, but not TOO large...
post #4 of 27
Thread Starter 
I'll add that the real pain does seem to emanate from the calf area. I guess it's possible that the fitter was wrong. He did seem to make the diagnosis pretty fast, but he's a very reputable guy here in town, so I took his word for it...
post #5 of 27
Why did your bootfitter need to bend back the plastic at the top rear of the boot?
post #6 of 27
Thread Starter 
I think that was an attempt to deal with the fact that the Falcon 10 is relatively tall boot and perhaps relieved pressure on the calf. That's at least what I THINK. He doesn't really do a lot of talking. He said, "your boot is too big," then took them to the back and came out, told me that he put in the shims to hold my heel in place and bent the top back but didn't really explain why.
post #7 of 27
What size street shoe do you wear?
What size is the ski boot? Include mm sizing from the side of the shell heel.
What type of terrain do you ski when the calf pain is present.
Are you doing a lot of jumps or bumps?
post #8 of 27
Thread Starter 
Street: 10.5 to 11
Boot: 326 mm 28/28.5
Calf pain usually presents itself toward the end of a steep, athletic run and as soon as I stop it increases dramatically.
I don't ski a LOT of bumps, but I am an aggressive, athletic skier

(thanks SO much for this help! Hopefully this will help others in the same predicament)
post #9 of 27
Thread Starter 
eta: they have been eat-molded by the fitter and I have 20+ days on them...
post #10 of 27
I'm wondering the same thing as your bootfitter...the boot may be too big.

What shape and width is your foot and heel? (wide/narrow with width measurement)

Are you very flexible?
post #11 of 27
Thread Starter 
I think I have a pretty "normal" foot - I've never had any problem with regular shoes. If the boots ARE too big - are they way too big? Could a new liner do anything? What would you recommend I do?
post #12 of 27
Even 1 shell size too big will have a huge impact on your skiing.
If in fact this boot is too big, don't expect an aftermarket liner to be a magic pill. You'd be better off getting the right size boot.
post #13 of 27
Thread Starter 
Well, ****...what would a guy do with a pair of slightly used Falcon 10s?
post #14 of 27
Reading through this thread, I am not convinced the boot size has any correlation to the leg pain? This boot does have a very stiff spoiler and my suspicion is you may be leveraging against the spoiler enough to cause the pain you are experiencing? Would you have any video of your skiing?
post #15 of 27
has the cuff alignment been adjusted to your leg, if it has not been set up you could bbe flexing across the direction in which the boot is bending which can cause the calf to spasm and cause pain, this along with the rear spoiler that Bud mentions sounds more plausible than just a boot too big

good luck
post #16 of 27
Is the pain you refer to a cramp? Does it seem like the muscle @ your calf
tightens and has a pain that is almost unbearable or does it feel like the rear cuff of the boot is pressing too hard against your leg?
post #17 of 27
I'll go along with the subtle assertion of Bud's that you may occassionally be sitting back or that the boot may be too high for you. However in that case bending the spoiler back should have helped a little. Your proper size could be a 27, but don't think one extra size should be giving this much difficulty.

Can you send some images of you standing in both boots, in shorts and taken from the side?

Lou
post #18 of 27
Thread Starter 
a) I probably am sitting back a tad - most likely on the steeps where I experience the most pain
b) the spoiler definitely is high, and I've always wondered if this is partially to blame
c) It's not a cramp I don't THINK - it feels more like maybe something related to circulation, although I'm no physiologist

I'll take the boots back in to the fitter today and see what he has to say. He has not done any alignment whatsoever so maybe there's a problem there as well. It just seems hard to believe that sitting back could cause such a significant problem. It only happens when I crank the buckles to the point where I feel the boot is tight enough...

Lou - I'll try to get those pics soon
post #19 of 27
Thread Starter 
I'm wondering if the problem is that the boot is slightly too large and definitely a bit high for my calf, and the combination of that and occasionally leaning back is where the problem really lies...
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by KyndKyd View Post
I'm wondering if the problem is that the boot is slightly too large and definitely a bit high for my calf, and the combination of that and occasionally leaning back is where the problem really lies...
I think that this seems reasonable to be. I'm still leery about the fact that you have to tighten this boot down so much to feel in control.
post #21 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantman View Post
I think that this seems reasonable to be. I'm still leery about the fact that you have to tighten this boot down so much to feel in control.
That's why you're thinking it's too large?
post #22 of 27
Or, he is buckling down to keep his toes from jamming into the front because of levering off the spoiler, he buckles tightly. Like Lou, I would like to see his fore/aft alignment set up and some dynamic skiing footage or ski with him before going to the expense of a new boot.

KyndKyd, Let's look at what bindings you are using (delta angle), where these bindings are mounted on your skis, ramp angle, dorsiflexion range. You may find by adjusting some of these angles in your equipment that you will be standing in a better position which eliminates the leg pains. That boot has some steeper angles than most others on the market which may or may not be right for you.

My first inclination would be to look at your stance and possibly drop the heel of your zeppa if you have a more hypermobil ankle or lift under the toe lug of the boot or toe piece of the binding to lower the delta angle if you have a normal range of motion or possibly put a heel lift in the boot and gas pedal the boot or binding if you have limited dorsiflexion. It just sounds like you may have fore/aft issues but I could be wrong and without seeing your static and dynamic stance it is pretty difficult to tell.
post #23 of 27
Thread Starter 
Well - I hope to set up an appointment for a real fitting with the fitter today. I'll let you guys know what he says. Thanks again for the continued input!
post #24 of 27
check out your peroneal longus
post #25 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregfits View Post
check out your peroneal longus

Err...ok? What might your point be? Isn't that a muscle that's more toward the front of the leg?
post #26 of 27
I believe this is the muscle that plantar flexes the foot pulling the 1st met head down which is a critical movement when initiating a turn. Finding good pressure on the first met head is important for balance in this phase of the turn. If you are constantly searching for this sensation but not finding it you could be overworking this muscle. At least I think this may be Greg's point? The answer here then would be to play with forefoot varus?
post #27 of 27
Thread Starter 
Finally got to the fitter today, and as most people suspected the boot was too big. They fit me in a pair of Tecnica Diablo Race Pro 110s. While I stood around in them I began to get some calf pain and once the fitter put a heel lift in, the pain went away. I'm now in a pair of 27.5s as opposed to 28.5 falcon 10. The fitter told me these two boots are essentially the same, but I still feel like the spoiler is lower on the Diablo, which means less tweaking on the calf. I'm getting footbeds made next week...
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