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getting into tele

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Just spent a week in Telluride with a bunch of friends, one of which who teles. He's got me thinking this might be the next thing I dive into. I've skied since I was about 10... 11 years now and unfortunately currently reside in the Midwest. I figured it would be something that might bring a bit of fun back to skiing here and would be something awesome I could take out west when I get that chance.

Thing is I really don't know where to start, I doubt I could rent or demo a pair here in the flatlands, so that's my first obstacle. Second anyone know of a hill in the midwest with a tele instructor? I've watched some instructional videos online, and I might be able to just go out with my friend a bunch and pick it up that way.

Next if/when I buy the gear what a recommendation on which skis to look at along with bindings and boots. I want something somewhat light... I hate heavy skis, they suck carrying up when your hiking. Also I really don't care if it doesn't perform worth a crap on our icy snow here, just something that will handle powder while also holding an edge on groomers.
Been looking at the K2 work stinx, seems like they might compromise that ok?
post #2 of 13
Dirty Mountain Hippie. Pretty soon you'll be patching your ski pants with duct tape and not bathing.

For gear: http://www.telemarkski.com/

I've heard good things about the Work Stinx. You also might want to try checking at www.telemarktips.com for info
post #3 of 13
Work Stinx are a good choice. I've never owned a pair, but I demoed some once. I liked them, they have a nice even flex to them and they still hold a pretty good edge even in hard conditions and they're great in pow.

Tele is much easier to learn in fresh snow, so don't make the mistake of jumping back on your alpine gear every time you get fresh snow.
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Que View Post
Dirty Mountain Hippie. Pretty soon you'll be patching your ski pants with duct tape and not bathing.

For gear: http://www.telemarkski.com/

I've heard good things about the Work Stinx. You also might want to try checking at www.telemarktips.com for info
I can only hope so

I already had to patch my gloves while I was out there. Brand new pair 2nd day whole palm of the glove was falling off. Ended up using electrical tape until I could come home and buy a pair reasonably priced.
post #5 of 13
I've never skied the Work Stinx and I've never skied in Illinois, but they are kind of wide if you expect to be primarily on hard packed snow.

Crystal Mountain in Michigan has telemark rentals, so I'm sure they have instructors, too. Most ski areas will have telemark instructors, call ahead. Pierre teaches at Snow Trails in Ohio. I don't know if that's close to you.
post #6 of 13
Can't speak for the Work Stinx, but BD Havocs are fun in a variety of conditions and carve decently and aren't too heavy. Boots are your first priority though.

For alpine skiers to make the transition, it's pretty easy to just go skiing and telepine for a while and gradually try to turn both ways with equal weight on each ski. You can then gradually simultaneously push the outside ski forward and the inside back trying to keep near equal weight with your center of gravity between your feet. Focusing on pressuring the big toe (front) & little toe (rear) while keeping the head up helps me stay centered. The objective is to use both skis to turn as one versus using one for alpine. The objective is NOT to drop the knee.....especially with out it being weighted (aka fake-marking or kneel-emarking), The hardest thing for alpine skiers to get their heads around is to weight the rear foot and ski.

Here's a video clip showing not much rear foot pressure but still turning. A little more rear pressure and better carving & balance. Upper body should be the same as for alpine turns.....quiet and relaxed.

HTH,
Terry
post #7 of 13
Lou Audi runs the Nordic center at Boyne Mountain. He's a PSIA tele/nord examiner and has tele gear among his rental collection. http://www.boyne.com/Winter/SnowSpor...k_Lessons.html
post #8 of 13
check out:

www.telemarktips.com (forum and online instructional videos)

www.telemarknato.com (they run clinics in the east and also produce a helpful video, "the Joy of Telemarking"
post #9 of 13
From another thread discussing used gear on eBay:

Quote:
Originally Posted by nosondre View Post
I've been teleing on the Legend 3800 in a 178 cm. 'Love this ski! Great torsional stiffness. It did my bidding and I pushed it pretty hard. I can't imagine anyone who is mostly skiing en piste not enjoying this ski.
I don't think you need to get too hung up on getting 'tele specific' skis as long as they are softer since you are trying to pressure both skis versus one. So if money is an issue you could get some used or 'lower tier' alpine skis at considerably less cost to at least get started and go from there.
post #10 of 13

my 2 cents on gear

Hi,
Above all, don't go high end on the performance charts,,it will work against you and significantly delay learning.
Softer boots to a degree, narrow mid-fats at the widest on skiis, and fairly neutral clamps to round it out. Remember, poles are somewhat shorter,,,...
Ski length is same or similar to what you use for alp.
That mix should set you up for success, as well as a set-up you can go stomping around the corn fields and local rolling hills.
Later on you are likely to want to keep this combo when you move up to somewhat more aggressive equpt.
Combining Nord DH skills and good Alp skills will make you a much more proficient skiier in the whole picture.
Have fun, enjoy the ride!!!
post #11 of 13
also two excellent books:

Allen & Mike's Really Cool Telemark Tips
http://www.amazon.com/Allen-Mikes-Re...95573&sr= 1-1

Paul Parker, Free-Heel Skiing: Telemark and Parallel Techniques for All Conditions http://www.amazon.com/Allen-Mikes-Re...95573&sr= 1-1
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by snodancer View Post
Hi,
Above all, don't go high end on the performance charts,,it will work against you and significantly delay learning.
Softer boots to a degree, narrow mid-fats at the widest on skiis, and fairly neutral clamps to round it out. Remember, poles are somewhat shorter,,,...
Ski length is same or similar to what you use for alp.
That mix should set you up for success, as well as a set-up you can go stomping around the corn fields and local rolling hills.
Later on you are likely to want to keep this combo when you move up to somewhat more aggressive equpt.
Combining Nord DH skills and good Alp skills will make you a much more proficient skiier in the whole picture.
Have fun, enjoy the ride!!!

Right on the money. Any upper int. alpine ski (that has a flat topsheet, no funky anti vibe or binding mounts) works great for a telemark ski, I ski on Salomon 1080 Foils. As far as bindings go Voile, G3, BD all make quality gear at decent price points. As far as boots go if you are coming from alpine you will probably want a fairly burly boot (ie. 3 buckle or better). Check out the lesson pages on telemarktips.com. I self taught myself almost 10 years ago for many of the same reasons telemark made 600 vertical fun again. I love it, welcome to the club.
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the replies. I'll look into getting some intermediate alpines if it's cheapers. 2 more questions though. Aren't tele specific skis lighter? Money is kinda of an issue, but in general? Also with the boots... I like the idea of a softer boot that doesn't bruise my shin after 7 days in a row. Should I still go with a slightly stiffer boot just to make the learning process easier?

Also I have a really old pair of HEAD carve 15's. There a beginner ski with not all that much shape, mount some bindings on those utill next year when I have more money to get a good tele ski?
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