EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Think you're "CORE"? Check this...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Think you're "CORE"? Check this...

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
This photo was taken from the Sublette Chair at Jackson Hole this morning. The location is right at Flip Point in Laramie Bowl. The pitch here is quite steep. In case you can't read what makes this photo impressive, double click and look at the larger image. You'll be able to read "Blind Skier" on the bib of the skier on the right.



And another shot to help with the perspective:




I'm not worthy.
post #2 of 22
I've skied blindfolded w/ a guide for the L2 Adaptive Cert. Not easy!
post #3 of 22
That dude is a stud!

I got to see a few of the events during the Paralympics after the SLC olympics. Those guys and gals are awesome!

My kids were especially blown away by the guys who race in those chairs with a ski on the bottom. You really have no appreciation for how fast they go until you see them live. Then you have racers with only one leg, can you imagine the burn that guy is feeling?

True athletes.
post #4 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters
And another shot to help with the perspective:
Yes indeed, and not just the visual one.

Thanks for sharing Bob.
post #5 of 22
I have seen blind skiers on our local hill, but not on anything like that.
I have a huge amount of respect for that!
post #6 of 22
Where is his dog?

Looks like he is using two canes...Wuss.

I ski like I'm blind from time to time.
post #7 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
Where is his dog?

Looks like he is using two canes...Wuss.

I ski like I'm blind from time to time.
He's probably got an avalanche dog, a BIG Saint Bernard with a little keg of peppermint schnapps tied to his collar!:
post #8 of 22
Sweeet!

Thanks for confirming what I already knew about myself, Bob... :

post #9 of 22
This guy is amazing. We saw them yesterday on more benign terrain off Casper somewhere. What interested me was that the guide seemed to be relying on voice signals where a lot of the blind adaptive skiers I have seen previously use radio directions. Either way big brass ones I reckon.
post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by gerathlete 1 View Post
This guy is amazing. We saw them yesterday on more benign terrain off Casper somewhere. What interested me was that the guide seemed to be relying on voice signals where a lot of the blind adaptive skiers I have seen previously use radio directions. Either way big brass ones I reckon.
Maybe because he can't actually see where he is, he has no idea how afraid he should actually be?
post #11 of 22
Many times I have skied with very little reference to what the terrain is doing as things white-out or lose all contrast between the snow, fog and featureless sky. I struggle to gain a reference, but get smacked down with vertigo as the visual references disappear into shades of white, blue and gray. In other words, I can't do what he does, and this guy does it every run.

I thank God for the crisp clear vision of a blue bird day with the sun glancing off the rocks and snow against a cobalt sky. I'll keep that and appreciate what it must be to ski in a perpetual whiteout.
post #12 of 22
And I was having trouble with my fogy goggles.
post #13 of 22
I really suck!
The man rocks!
post #14 of 22
That is humbling.
post #15 of 22
Nice pic Bob. Last year on the other side, skiers right of Sublette, in Cheyenne Bowl we skied passed a blind skier buy only barely on the last run of the day. The guy was awesome and he didn't stop either. He just kept skiing all the way to the bottom. Truly impressive.
post #16 of 22
Humbling indeed. Skiing predominantly at WP I see quite a few handicap skiers. I am always amazed at their skills and drive.
post #17 of 22
Skiing visually impaired hones your balance to a fine degree. Try it with a GUIDE on an easy,quiet trail sometime. Voice commands work well. Adaptive skiers are an inspiration to all of us.
post #18 of 22
I saw them from the gondi, they were in some rather tight trees between Sundance and Upper Gros Ventre, the guy was just killing it in some very soft snow.
post #19 of 22
I couldn't do that with any competence with two good eyes and legs and a reward at the end. Much props!
post #20 of 22
Thanks for sharing, Bob. Truly inspiring!

- KK
post #21 of 22
Wow that is impressive, but I've always kind of wondered where the thrill is for blind skiers. A major aspect of skiing for me is visual, seeing terrain flying by me, getting that rush of speed.
I've always said that if I lost my legs or something that I would have to use a sit ski, there is no way I'd give skiing up (plus those things look like morre fun than stand skiing), but I don't know if the same holds true if I lost my sight. I just don't know if it would hold the same appeal.
Although I guess you end up using your other senses more and can still sense motion and get the rush
Is there anyone that can enlighten me about what it is like to ski blind (or even blindfolded)? Do you still get the same speed rush? Or is it more about doing something physically strenuous and challenging (more on par with climbing/hiking or distance running)?

No matter how the rush comes, that guy is bad ass!
post #22 of 22

Skiing JH

Thanks Bob, Inspirational and humbling vicarious image/experience.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Think you're "CORE"? Check this...